self defense Archives -
February 26th, 2020 by AmSJ Staff

The Gauntlet for Girls

Story and photographs by Robert Campbell

Women are not a minority in America, gentlemen. There are some 6 million more of them than us – perhaps even a few more since 2010’s census, where that stat comes from. Many female shooters are interested in the shooting sports as well as personal defense. If you are in a gun-related sales field, you would do well to treat them well. If you are a professional trainer, you must be alert to the nuances and differences of the female thought process. To ignore this significant portion of the shooting fraternity/sorority is a disservice to all concerned.

PHOTO 5

Before purchasing a handgun, take a training course first, the author suggests. Women will then have a much better idea of the level of complication and comfort they are willing to adapt to.

I am going to gloss over the psychological differences between men and women, as they are vast and touched on elsewhere this issue. What I will focus on are a few things I have found interesting during my 20-plus years in law enforcement and instructing people from all walks of life. Women make interesting choices. They are often very independent, don’t have ego problems and progress very quickly.

I do not live and breathe gunpowder smoke, but it is certainly something I love. When the opportunity comes to indoctrinate a young shooter in the proper use of a firearm, I am always ready, and a large number of these shooters are females. In the basic NRA Course, most of these students are interested in obtaining a concealed-carry permit, while others simply want to learn how to use a firearm safely; few are interested in filling a gun safe. When it comes to firearm instruction, I highly suggest turning them over to a qualified trainer.
DEAD FOOT ARMS

A father or spouse interested in a female’s shooting progress often diminishes the value of the instruction. I sent my own daughter to driving school, money well spent, in my opinion.

man woman taking aim

With all due respect to the equality of the sexes, women need self-defense training more than men because women are targeted more often as victims of violent attacks, the author argues.

I have been to gun shops where even I have been offended and I can only imagine a female traveling to one of these alone; it can be a disastrous encounter. The good-old boys could sometimes use a Dale Carnegie course. As an example, one of my daughters, who is a very capable shooter, an NRA-certified firearms instructor, and purposely drives a truck because she had been told all her life what type of cars women should drive, went into a gun store and was automatically presented a pink-handled woman’s gun by a gun-store clerk who was very condescending. Now, putting aside the fact that she actually likes pink guns (my other daughter doesn’t care and the clerk couldn’t have known that), these are exactly the problems women are facing.


Men and women alike make the same mistakes. When many purchase their first gun they find out later that it’s too big to carry concealed. Others might purchase one that is too small for personal defense, and still others might choose a low-quality option. Only with good education and a bit of study behind them will they be able to make a choice that is beneficial.

girl aiming pistol

It seems that the most motivated shooters are those who have been a victim of an assault. Confidence in the handgun and a concealed-carry permit as well as a good working understanding of the handgun go a long way toward aiding these women to defend themselves if need be.

As an NRA instructor I teach the basic handgun course. Often I find that females in my class have no one in their family who is a “gun person.” It’s all new to them, and perhaps that is for the best because they are starting out with a clean slate. Oftentimes, a well-meaning person has taught the shooter bad habits, and those are very difficult to shake. The ladies I have seen – from fledging attorneys all the way to 17-year Army reservists – have impressed me at every turn. One thing I have noticed is women do not care to maintain their firearms as diligently as men. Men are more likely to tinker with what isn’t broken.

It also seems that the most motivated shooters are those who have been a victim of an assault. Confidence in the handgun and a concealed-carry permit, as well as a good working understanding of the handgun, go a long way toward aiding these women to defend themselves, if need be. If you are the right kind of trainer, you should never let the female student’s ability to pay decide if you take them on as a student. Many of these good girls are financially distressed for a number of reasons. When I was in law enforcement, I saw a number of young girls and elderly women who were robbed, beaten and assaulted in my city. I wish they had been better able to defend themselves. Sometimes, though, you hear about the occasional assailant who made a poor decision when choosing their victims. The results are gratifying to right-minded people. 

Jesse Duff

Jesse Duff is recognized as one of the most accomplished competitive shooters in the world. She is known as the first female shooter to achieve the rank of Grand Master in the USPSA (United States Practical Shooting Association).

The choice in handguns for females comes up a lot, and often the choice is made before the owner takes a class, which is a shame. The .38-caliber snub-nose revolver remains an excellent all-around choice for most female shooters, but perhaps the worst performance I have seen from them is when they are armed with some type of .40-caliber subcompact purchased by a well-meaning parent or spouse.

These guns are just too much; the same goes for the snub-nose .357 Magnum. Even tough men have problems with these handguns. In my opinion, a shooter’s first handgun should be a good quality .22 caliber. The Ruger Standard Model is close to perfect, but even the aforementioned .38 is difficult to argue against for many reasons. A smaller caliber, such as the .380 ACP, has merit when used as a nasal inhaler for the bad guy, but is lacking the requisite balance of penetration and expansion. If you cannot control a 9mm automatic or a snub-nose .38, I would skip the rest and go straight to the .22 Magnum. A revolver may create a bulge on a woman’s hip like a boa that has swallowed a possum, but the nice thing about it is you can place it against an attacker’s chest and pull the trigger repeatably. It will not jam in the worst-case scenario. Think hard about the choices.

There are commercials that depict criminals breaking into homes, and when the alarms sounds, the criminal runs away. This may be true of the intruder who is only motivated by profit or startled by the sound, but a criminal who is abusive or violent will not be deterred by an alarm. Even in the best situation, police response is about 5 minutes, and a lot of damage can occur in that time.

When many of us began shooting, we were hopeless. But if the student has the will to learn, male or female, they will. AmSJ

Posted in Women and guns Tagged with: , , , , ,

December 10th, 2019 by AmSJ Staff

The Trend Data shows that Women feel Responsible for their own Protection

Story and Photographs by Tatiana Whitlock

Every day, women become less of a minority amongst American gun owners. The trend data shows that women feel responsible for their own protection and are taking the necessary steps to ensure it.

Even more interesting is the quietly growing number of females who are participating in self-defense firearms courses that go beyond the basics. What these courses offer are aspects of shooting that relate directly to real life. Spatial and situational awareness as well as firearm manipulation techniques are just a few of those concepts.

The combination of these skill sets begins to introduce a new shooter to thinking outside of the gun. They learn what the gun’s role needs to be depending on the wide variety of potential situations, and there are a number of ways to incorporate this into your home and range practice. By combining real-to-you environments, distances and manipulation techniques you become better prepared for the world outside of the range. After all, the reason so many women carry and have home-defense firearms is to be prepared if they must use them. Aim to transform your plinking time to reality-inspired training by designing a training plan that builds mental and physical proficiency in your daily life.

Training in Context
To obtain a concealed-carry permit, people must pass proficiency shooting requirements. Those vary from state to state, but most have a minimum standard of 3 to 10 yards. Much of this comes from the self-defense magic number of 7 yards, or 21 feet. Though it does establish a baseline, 7 yards is rather limiting and often becomes a comfort zone that many shooters fail to train beyond. Rarely are the circumstances such that a deadly force encounter occurs at a nice, neat 7 yards, and more importantly, there are other distances that more accurately relate to your unique living situation and are worth considering when building your training regimen.

CC-TLW-FEMALE-6-min

The distance from your pillow to the bedroom door could be as little as 4 feet. A stairwell comprised of 16 steps measures roughly 13 feet from the first step to the landing.

CC-TLW-FEMALE-4-min

Transferring each to the gun range gives you real, scenario-based distances that are applicable to your home.

Grab a measuring tape and reintroduce yourself to your home. What is the shortest, average and longest distance from which an intruder could attack you? For example: The average American bedroom measures 120 square feet and is required by building code R304 to have no less than 7 linear feet in any direction. Translation: The distance from your pillow to the bedroom door could be as little as 4 feet. A stairwell comprised of 16 steps measures roughly 13 feet from the first step to the landing. For some, the longest distance in your home may exceed the 21-foot distance where so many of us are comfortable shooting.

No one knows your home like you do. Commit to memory a mental snapshot of your view from each engagement area. These measurements now translate to real environments filled with furniture, fixtures, lighting and sounds. The values may be uncomfortably close and personal or surprisingly farther than you expected. Transferring each to the gun range gives you real, scenario-based distances that are applicable to your home.

For those carrying concealed, it is worth repeating this exercise for other places and spaces you frequent. A long aisle at the grocery store could measure 46 feet or more. What is the distance from the parking garage floor entrance to your regular parking space? Translate these distances into your personal training plan. Set your targets at distances meaningful to your everyday life and bring an element of reality into the artificial training environment of the square range. While it is our hope that we are never faced with a situation requiring us to take that long shot, it is our responsibility to be proficient at all relative distances.

Training in Character
Set your target at your closest, middle and longest distance and practice each one. Working your longest distance first will force you to slow down and focus. Close your eyes and visualize the environment, the sounds of your home, what it feels like to be in that space. Now get into character and imagine: There is an intruder brandishing a weapon and making threats to your life as they menacingly advance towards you. Choose to be confident, calm, focused and in control. Open your eyes and maintain this mental image and mindset as you draw, acquire your sight picture and alignment, press the trigger and follow through.

Complete the sequence of fire with a visual scan and assess as you visualize, searching the area around the downed intruder to confirm they are no longer a threat to you and that they didn’t bring friends. Look around and behind you, maintaining muzzle awareness at all times, and keep your firearm pointed down range at your imagined threat. Where are your kids? Where is the dog? Just because rounds are fired doesn’t mean your job is done. Breathe. For the sake of practice, re-holster, reset your mind, your gear and your target distance for another round.

CC-TLW-FEMALE-5-min

Look around and behind you, maintaining muzzle awareness at all times, and keep your firearm pointed down range at your imagined threat. Where are your kids? Where is the dog? Just because rounds are fired doesn’t mean your job is done.

Top athletes use this mental rehearsal technique to connect the psychological and physical components of a performance or event for optimal results under stress. The more vivid imagery you choose, the greater confidence and control you will have under stress. Those training with personal protection in mind fully expect that critical life-saving moment will be an extreme and stressful experience. Build in the necessary survival mindset into every dry-fire and live-fire training session.

Breaking away from training at comfortable distances and areas where you already excel can result in less than ideal-looking targets, initially. Become less focused on making targets worthy of bragging rights and more concerned with spending your time and ammunition working on perfecting the tough stuff. With a little planning, you can make your next trip to the range a more meaningful one by working on the scenarios, real-world distances and life-saving mindset to hone your shooting skills even further.

You just may find that a measuring tape could be the next accessory you add to your range bag! AmSJ

Posted in Women and guns Tagged with: , , , , ,

February 17th, 2017 by jhines

[su_heading size=”30″]The Moves are Un-Detectable[/su_heading]

There are many martial arts systems out there that teaches empty hand knife defense skills. Most of the scenario is your basic knife at the stomach, knife at the small of your back or thrusting at the stomach.

But what’s really different about this next one is what if the attacker has the knife at the neck area with the blade touching the skin. And, to make it further interesting for this training/demonstration is to have the attacker cut your neck if he senses that the defender tries to defend with a technique of some sort.

Fred Mastro is a self defense instructor from Germany, he has some great solutions for this type of knife defense. His approach is practical in sense of non economy of motion. In this case its actually about economy of techniques. For example, most self defense system would teach you to quickly go for the hand holding the knife and do a wrist lock to disarm them. So imagine in your mind as soon as the defender intitiate his movement to grab the adversary knife hand, more than likely the defender has been cut and they’re now wrestling over the blade.

Mastro shows you simple strikes at the ribs and the back of the neck to throw your adversary off, these are effective stuns that creates an involuntary reaction from the adversary to move away from the defender. Like when the doctor hits test your reflex by tapping your knees or funny bone. The beauty behind these strikes is that the attacker don’t see it coming.
Body Targets

  • Ribs
  • Back of Neck
  • Side of Thigh (Sciatic Nerve)
  • Inside of Knee

[su_heading size=”30″]Video Transcription[/su_heading]

[Fred Mastro] Ok, if you have a knife… Ok, this position. Not just to work here, because you can cut. At the same time, we need this, to have this little distance to work. Ok. After this, I love this. [Disarm]

[Director] One more time. And explain to us why he can’t stop it. May I? May I try?

[Fred] Yeah.

[Director] So, if you move, I–

[Fred] Yeah. So if I move, you cut, huh?

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred attacks]

[Director] Cut! I cut him!

[Fred] Ok. If I move, you cut.

[Fred attacks]

[Director] Cut!

[Fred] Elbow, cut.

[Director] I cut him.

[Fred] I go back, gun? Cut.

[Director] Easy.

[Fred] Ok. (to Cameraman) Go here. (To Director) I need to make a little distance, and in the same time…

[Fred Punches]

[Director] OH! [pained noises]

[Fred] Just to have a distance.

[Director] One more.

[Fred] Ok.

[Director] I’m gonna cut him.

[Fred] Yeah. Please. Ok. [Punches]

[Director gives pained noises]

[Director] (groaning) I cut him. I think I cut him.

[Fred] Ok. You know why?

[Director] Why?

[Fred] Because first time, you are like this. And second time, you are like this. [Laughter] Yeah. If you are close, yeah, get in close. Not close, this one.

[Director, grunting] Yeah.

[Fred] Very close, it’s incredible, but you have some nerve with your hands. [Fred whacks the Director, who grunts]

[Stick drops as Doug walks off in pain]

[Fred] Can you cut, Doug?

[Doug] Cut me? Ok.

[Director] No.

[Fred] You don’t see what’s happened?

[Director] No.

[Doug] You don’t see it, exactly. You don’t see it. You just– that’s the key.

[Fred] It’s mean, but it’s not these guys behind you.

[Director] You lose all intention. You lose ANY intention. You lose EVERYTHING.

[Fred] You need– for this one, is better, to feel just the end, some very close contact. Is possible [Uninteligable] With a short knife. No problem. But look the hand– [Fred attacks director] Distance. Ok?

[Director] Yeah, I pulled–

[Fred] You need this distance. The same. Here? Ok? The same move. You can see this. [Fred knees Director, Director falls, cursing quietly.] Ah, please sir. Please, please. [mock-cuts Director’s hand, laughs, helps him back up.] This one is good for camera.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] Because, is not large move. Is very close, slow motion, I don’t touch you. No, use your hand, use your hand. This. Where’s this, my body is not this, but this. And I need the distance with the knife. Slow motion.

[Director] Show me the wrong way. If you punch me the wrong way I go this way.

[Fred] Normal. If I hit you normally.

[Director] Yeah, yeah.

[Fred] Elbow is the same. The elbow is the same, if I block and I come in with the elbow, is the same.

[Director] *Bow*, *bow*, right through!

[Fred] Never punch in this situation. I saw some style of this, they come and punch– ok, but!

[Director] I’m cutting him!

[Fred] You know why? You don’t know the size of the blade. If the blade is this size, is the blade this size? Imagine a big blade, I don’t see, because this is my angle.

[Director] Yeah, oh, here. The blade’s here.

[Fred] I punch you–

[Director] *SCHTCHT* [laughter]

[Fred] Big distance with the blade. You cut the VIP. Sure. The same, here. I love -this- reaction. To have this reaction, you need to work down. Inside the knee [Fred kicks Director, Director grunts and reacts] and you have this reaction.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] Can feel the– You feel the knee.

[Director] But!

[Fred] It’s twenty per-cent. Twenty percent. Twenty percent. Sometimes, -the same- ok. I can use, I like this punch. [Fred punches Director, who grunts and doubles over again] Ok.

[Director] Phone! [laughter]

[Fred] No, you can’t say, no problem. But I break the- [laughter] But the best one is this, and this.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] And no problem, I don’t need to catch this, look. Very slow, ten percent, look, this one and this one. Ten percent. See?

[Director] It’s moving.

[Fred] Take a knife, real knife. Real knife. This is muscle. I’m sure. Take the knife. Take! Take the knife, brother. Take the knife.

[Director] [Grunts in pain, drops knife, curses]

[Fred] Twenty-five percent. Just twenty-five percent.

[Cameraman] How ‘ya doin’ there, big guy?

[Director] I was not– ok that wasn’t rehearsed, I was not comfortable with having the real knife out. Uh, not something that we would normally do or normally show, but I guess in this instance, we gotta do it man. Because the videos sometimes don’t do this shit justice, and there’s a lot of– just, just, go man. Go to a course. I dare you. I will personally give you double your money back if you ever go to like a Mastro seminar and you’re like ‘yeah this is Bullshit’. Personally. I’ll put my life on it, man. Forreal. So, uh, the usual stuff: Like, subscribe, comment, come to a class and experience it for yourself. That’s all I gotta say. Now I gotta go… fuckin’…FUCK.

Posted in Training Tagged with: , , ,

January 28th, 2017 by jhines

What happens when you bring a fight to a gun store?

When two men entered the Dixie Gun and Pawn at 11 am to rob the place, it’s hard to tell what they were thinking. Were they aiming for a store next door? Did they really think they had a foolproof plan? Were they just bored and looking to spice up their lives?

They tried to wave guns, and one man even tried to pull a second handgun, but they neglected the thought that maybe, just maybe, the store clerk at the Dixie GUN and pawn might also be carrying a gun.

The man tried to pull a second gun was promptly shot dead by the worker behind the counter, while the other fled and has not been identified yet.

The shooting was excellent, and in this writer’s opinion, justified; But of course, that doesn’t excuse the callous disregard for life that has followed suit.

The comments of the video have ranged from simply insensitive (suggestions that the dead man’s body be photographed and turned into a cardboard standee to ward off other intruders) to outright racist (comments with phrases like “Then again, black guys aren’t known for being smart”).

While the man behind the counter should be praised for his calm under pressure and survival instinct, let’s not forget that even poor life choices don’t stop a person from being human. In this case, this was a life-or-death situation and life-or-death measures were taken, but it is still not acceptable to treat a death as callous humor, and it is never acceptable to make racist comments. This writer is apalled. In 2017, we should all be better than this.

Comments

@Jack_Mehoffer�before the shot, the criminal look at his fellow. Bad decision for him.

@raven11356�You’d think two black guys would avoid tempting fate by not robbing a gun shop named after the Confederate South. Then again, black guys aren’t known for being smart.

@Jack Tors�It’s not a “robbery suspect” that died on the floor – it’s an armed robber.
Lucky they have a camera in the shop…

@ValleyBlacksmith�Well stated. I wouldn’t be surprised if the newsy types used the word ‘allegedly’ somewhere in there description of the event. FFS it’s stone cold proven on video and they’ll give benefit of the doubt. I’m all for ‘innocent until proven guilty’, but I think this one was settled.

@stoma_rider�Less than 2 seconds and that gun store clerk assesed, drew and center massed that clown. That was homey’s last robbery.

@jeffbaustin�He doesn’t move an inch after gravity is finished. Dead as a door nail.

@PHILBAWDY�Ya a .45 packs one hell of a punch. Old man even held steady on the recoil. This is how it should be. Government wants to take guns away from these people so they can get robbed all the time and possibly killed. The government can shove it up their ass

You know he’s been waiting for years for that to happen.
Who robs a gun/pawn shop? That’s the worst target to choose.

by Sam Morstan

Sources: LiveLeak

Posted in Self Defense Tagged with:

December 31st, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″]The Ruger 3-inch LCRx remains an excellent choice for a lightweight trail gun or for home defense.[/su_heading]

STORY AND PHOTOS BY ROB REED

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]R[/su_dropcap]ecently, the Ruger LCRx with a 3-inch barrel transformed the popular lightweight revolver design from a snub-nose carry gun into a handy general-purpose revolver.

The Ruger LCRx in .38 Special.

The Ruger LCRx in .38 Special.

The innovative LCR design has been a hit with shooters since the original Ruger LCR .38 Special +P was released in 2009. That design was optimized for concealed carry with a five-round cylinder, 1.875-inch barrel and hammerless, double-action-only trigger. Since that time Ruger (ruger.com) has expanded the line by chambering the gun in new calibers and adding new features. The LCRx model added single-action capability by introducing an exposed hammer to the available options but retained the short barrel length.

The author tested the LCRx with .38 Special loads from Hornady.

The author tested the LCRx with .38 Special loads from Hornady.

In late 2014 Ruger released the LCRx with a 3-inch barrel. This variant is again chambered in .38 Special +P with an exposed hammer that allows both double-action and single-action activation. The 3-inch tube has a full-length rib and fulllength underlug. The black rear sight is adjustable for both elevation and windage. The serrated front sight features a white square to aid in sight acquisition. The sight is pinned to the barrel and can be easily removed and replaced with one of the other front sight options available from Ruger. The package is completed with the installation of a full-size Hogue Tamer grip in place of the shorter grips on the previous models.

The rest of the gun follows the general LCR pattern: The two main structural components are the aerospace-grade aluminum frame mated to a polymer fire control housing. The lock work includes a patented friction-reducing cam that eliminates stacking and reduces the perceived trigger weight. The stainless-steel cylinder is heavily fluted for weight savings with a durable black Ionbond Diamondblack finish. The push-button cylinder release is in the normal Ruger location on the left side of the frame behind the cylinder.

1701-ruger-lcr-03THE BARREL UTILIZES a stainless-steel liner and aluminum shroud with a polished muzzle. The ejector rod is the same length as on the 2-inch barreled models. The one-piece grip fits onto a shorter grip peg molded as part of the fire control housing. The grip can be removed and replaced by unscrewing a single screw in the butt.

The first thing I noticed about my review model was the size. While the LCR heritage is evident, this is no pocket gun. The extra inch of barrel, full-length rib, and larger sized Hogue grip add enough to the physical envelope to push it into the small side of the medium-frame revolver category.

The 3-inch barrel increased the overall length to 7.5 inches, while the full-length rib and larger Hogue grip make it taller at 5.8 inches. The LCRx 3-inch weighs 15.7 ounces. For comparison, the standard 2-inch-barreled .38 Special LCR is 6.5 inches long, 4.5 inches high, and weighs 13.5 ounces.

I had my gunsmith measure the trigger pull with a Lyman digital gauge when I picked up the revolver. This revealed a pull weight of 11.5 pounds for double-action and 7.0 pounds for single-action.

I tested the gun with a variety of .38 Special loads provided by Hornady Ammunition. This included their Critical Defense Lite 90-grain FTX load, their Critical Defense 110-grain FTX standard and +P loads, their 125-grain XTP load, and their 158-grain XTP load.

I warmed up by shooting a few rounds at a plate rack at 15 yards to give me a general feel for the double-action and single-action trigger pulls. I then fired for groups at 25 yards while seated at a table with my hands resting on the LCR’s zipper bag for padding. All firing here was single-action.

The best group, measured from the furthest distances of the holes, was almost exactly 2½ inches.

Interestingly, it was almost exactly the same when measured from the top- to bottom-most holes as when measured from the furthest left to the furthest right. This was the standard-pressure 158-grain FTX load.

The second best group was from the Critical Defense 110-grain standard-pressure load that printed at just over 3 inches, from furthest edge to furthest edge, with pronounced left-to-right stringing.

1701-ruger-lcr-04

The revolver is a great choice for shooters of smaller stature.

Unfortunately, the deliberate single-action, slow-fire shooting revealed a mechanical problem that I hadn’t noticed during the more casual firing at the plate rack. The hammer was noticeably more difficult to cock on one of the chambers than the others. I later consulted with a gunsmith friend who said the likely cause was due to out-of-spec machining on the lobe of the star corresponding to that chamber. (I later cleaned the revolver and the problem was still there during dry fire with the clean gun.) The one bad hammer pull made the precision testing more difficult. I only got the best two groups later in the test after I identified and compensated for the issue. At first the heavier and grittier pull on that chamber both threw off my concentration and also caused me to break my grip. This also made it impossible to determine if any particular load was more accurate in the gun. A typical “bad” group was 5 inches or so, often with one flyer that messed up an otherwise good group.

1701-ruger-lcr-05

The author achieved good results shooting at 25 yards while seated.

IN EXCHANGE FOR THE LARGER size and weight over the flagship LCR, you get a revolver that is easier and more fun to shoot. The grip is large and comfortable, the hammer is easily accessible for single-action cocking, and the longer sight radius and more visible sights help practical accuracy. The extra weight over the standard .38 Special version helps make the gun more pleasant to shoot as well. While the +P rounds had some noticeable sting, they weren’t bad, and the polymer trigger housing and generous grip soaked up the recoil of the standard-pressure rounds nicely.

The only disappointment in the design was that the gun retained the short 2-inch ejector rod of the parent models. While it’s understandable that Ruger wouldn’t want to spend the money on a dedicated 3-inch ejector rod for this model, having that full ejector rod stroke would have been a nice touch. Note that I didn’t have any problems with the shorter ejection stroke; I just prefer the longer ejector rod when possible.

The Ruger LCRx 3-inch would make an excellent choice for a lightweight trail gun, as a concealed carry gun in a belt holster, or as a home defense gun. As with most revolvers, the limited ammo capacity is an issue, but if you want a lightweight revolver that shots like a medium-frame gun, this is one to get. ASJ

Posted in Handguns Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

October 19th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″]Tac Star’s Slimline Shotshell Carrier increases the readiness factor of every smoothbore.[/su_heading]

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAVE WORKMAN

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]R[/su_dropcap]ecent tragic events have forced a growing number of armed citizens to the realization that while it is still a remote possibility, the potential for finding one’s self in the middle of a terrorist action or a riot has gone up, as has the need for a defensive weapon.

After San Bernardino and Orlando, our comfort zones have shrunk, and for the first time many of us can remember, some in law enforcement have changed their tune from “call 911 and wait” to “run, hide or fight.”

The author’s Mossberg 50 pump shotgun and Tac Star’s handy Side Saddle Slimline accessory prior to easy assembly.

The author’s Mossberg 50 pump shotgun and Tac Star’s handy Side Saddle Slimline accessory prior to easy assembly.

Unfortunately, San Bernardino taught us that we may not be able to run fast enough, and Orlando showed us that hiding and waiting to be saved might not be a survivable option. That leaves the third alternative.

According to a recent report by the Crime Prevention Research Center, the notion of carrying a handgun for personal protection has inspired somewhere north of 14 million citizens to arm up, and the number is rising steadily.

To attach the shell holder, start by using the appropriate punch to tap out the rear retaining pin through the trigger assembly, being careful not to let the trigger move.

To attach the shell holder, start by using the appropriate punch to tap out the rear retaining pin through the trigger assembly, being careful not to let the trigger move.

I PREFER A DEFENSIVE HANDGUN because it can always be with me. But it’s just one tool in the box. If it should ever come to pass that something major happens, I’ll use that sidearm to get me to something with a little more horsepower: my Mossberg 500 pump shotgun.

Many of us have good pump guns in the closet for bird hunting or maybe home defense. Mine was purchased some 25 years ago, as a package deal. It has a 20-inch upland bird barrel with a vent rib, and a second 18-inch barrel with an open choke. I ordered it with a “Speed Feed” synthetic stock designed to hold four extra shells, two on each side, in spring-loaded slots. With the plug out, that gave me five shells in the tubular magazine and one in the chamber, plus four spares.

Recently I added something new, thanks to Tac Star’s latest entry in the Side Saddle lineup, the “Slimline” version. Made from a tough rubber compound with a metal backing plate, this worthwhile add-on allows the user to have six extra shells at hand on the left side of the receiver in the event one has to grab and run. What previously gave me 10 rounds now offers as many as 16 shots, provided I start off fully loaded.

Unscrew the small slide screw inside the receiver, through the open ejection port.

Unscrew the small slide screw inside the receiver, through the open ejection port.

INSTALLING THIS ACCESSORY is a snap. First, make sure your shotgun is completely unloaded. Then, using the proper diameter punch, push out the pin on the lower rear of the receiver that holds the trigger assembly in place, being careful to keep the trigger housing where it belongs.

These shell slots are made of a tough rubber compound.

These shell slots are made of a tough rubber compound.

Tac Star provides a two-piece screw that inserts from both ends. One end features a beveled head that fits into the corresponding slot on the Side Saddle Slimline. Two small hex wrenches are also included to tighten this screw from both sides simultaneously.

However, don’t tighten the first screw all the way. Leave enough slack for the mount to rotate so that it can be fastened up front. Remove the interior slide screw with a screwdriver inserted in the open ejection port. Insert the replacement screw that goes through a corresponding hole up front on the Side Saddle and tighten it down. Then finish tightening the rear screw.

It’s also a good idea to use a drop of blue Loctite to keep both screws in place.

Workman recently dressed up his Mossberg 50 for defensive duty with the Side Saddle shotshell carrier. A pistoleer always has a backup plan.

Workman recently dressed up his Mossberg 50 for defensive duty with the Side Saddle shotshell carrier. A pistoleer always has a backup plan.

You can pray to all the Gods in the heavens to keep you safe and out of harm’s way, or you can follow the age-old advice of the Boy Scouts and “always be prepared.” Personally, I’d rather prepare than simply pray, except to pray that all of my preparations never have to be used. ASJ


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October 14th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″]Tactical Walls thinks ‘outside the big, steel box’ with its innovative gun safe designs.[/su_heading]

STORY BY CRAIG HODGKINS • PHOTOS BY TACTICAL WALLS 

This recessed In-Wall Home-Defense Mirror from Tactical Walls comes in black (shown), early American, Dutch walnut, cherry, white and “raw.”

This recessed In-Wall Home-Defense Mirror from Tactical Walls comes in black (shown), early American, Dutch walnut, cherry, white and “raw.”

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]F[/su_dropcap]or decades, gun owners were forced to make difficult choices or to compromise when it came to firearms storage. On one hand, owners needed firearms to be stored securely to protect them from theft and to ensure the safety of younger family members. At the same time, protecting those same loved ones often required that the firearms be quickly and easily available for access in case of an intruder or other emergency.

There have been excellent gun safes on the market for decades, and many do their intended job very well. But until recently, gun safes were all about security and safety, not easy access.

That all began to change a few years ago, when technological advancements such as radio frequency identification (RFID) enabled companies to think outside the big, steel box and develop products that could provide both security and access. One of these, Tactical Walls, has done an excellent job creating firearms storage products that “hide in plain sight.”

The mirror opens with one swipe of an RFID key card.

The mirror opens with one swipe of an RFID key card.

One of the things I like about these products is that every security item they produce is disguised as a functional piece of furniture or home décor. And once you’ve seen their product line in person, you’ll never be able to look at a bedroom mirror, decorative shelf or wall clock the same way again.

Several recent releases in the Tactical Walls line offer RFID locking mechanisms as an optional alternative to the existing magnetic lock. According to company literature, opening up a hidden compartment is as easy as swiping the preset RFID card in front of the locking mechanism. Each RFID unit comes standard with two key cards and one programming card used to match the key to the proper unit, and owners can order additional RFID cards if needed. If desired, a single card can also be set to open multiple units, granting access to each firearm staged throughout the home.

Tactical Walls shelves are designed for use with standard 2x4 stud framing, and hang like any regular wall shelf.

Tactical Walls shelves are designed for use with standard 2×4 stud framing, and hang like any regular wall shelf.

Each shelf comes preassembled, and is supplied with a set of two bookend-style shelf brackets for added support, one foam insert, plus anchors and fasteners.

Each shelf comes preassembled, and is supplied with a set of two bookend-style shelf brackets for added support, one foam insert, plus anchors and fasteners.

The new RFID-locking models also offer a programmable “tattletale” function that (when activated) will begin beeping when the unit has been left open for a designated period of time. This helps firearms owners keep guns from unwanted users by reminding them when the compartment is left open.

A foam insert securely holds everything in place in this undershelf design, and optional LED lights help illuminate your hidden cache.

A foam insert securely holds everything in place in this undershelf design, and optional LED lights help illuminate your hidden cache.

Finally, in addition to being excellent firearm storage devices, Tactical Walls products stand out because they are built to last. For example, their new rifle-length shelves are handcrafted in the U.S. using real hardwood, and are available in six different finishes.

A close-up view of the sturdy RFID locking mechanism.

A close-up view of the sturdy RFID locking mechanism.

MSRPs for Tactical Walls products are based on several factors, including lock type, shelf length and choice of finish, so contact the company or a dealer near you for more information.

Tactical Walls is based in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, and is a family-owned and -operated business. To learn more, visit tacticalwalls.com. ASJ


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