22 Magnum Pistol – for Self-Defense, would you?

For concealed carrier having a reliable pistol that you’re comfortable with is ideal. If you’re a newbie and think that you want to start with a reliable pistol.
Why not look into a getting a Ruger LCR-22, compact light handgun weighs 16-ounce, affordable and easy to shoot.
It incorporates several novel features such as a polymer grip and trigger housing, monolithic receiver, and constant force trigger.
Operates in double-action only (DAO) as the hammer is concealed within the frame handle’s fire control housing of the gun and cannot be cocked prior to firing, shoots .22 Winchester Rimfire caliber.

Some may argue that the .22 WMR is too small for personal defense. Those that think this way are looking at it from a hunter mindset, that is one shot one kill.
However, for self-defense purpose the primary objective is stop the bad guy from doing bad things.
There are three ways to stop a threat with a pistol:

  • Causing enough pain that the bad guy submits or voluntarily decides to stop
  • Incapacitation, which is an involuntary reaction on the part of the bad guy in response to being shot, this can be instant or it can take some time.
  • Using Fear as a psychological deterrent, no one wants to get shot at when there is gun pointed at them.

Let’s move onto the cartridge itself, yes, its not a .357.
The .22 WMR does not have the stopping power of a .357, it does have velocity. Back to this later, many gun experts will test out these cartridges against gel.
Its simply a ballistic test medium which is thought to offer the same resistance to a bullet as would muscle tissue.
However, it does not replicate skin, ribs, cartilage or fat and, in fact, very often the way a bullet performs in living tissue is quite different than how it performs in gelatin.
Ok, you’re still stuck on the different calibers and how a .22 compares.
Penetration
Well, there were comparisons acquired where they place a .22 WRM, 9mm and a .45 ACP. The penetration from the heavier slugs was deeper at 13 inches. The .22 WRM was going in at a little over 12 inches. Not much differences.
Velocity
The average 9mm Luger velocity ran about 1,175 fps.
The average .45 ACP ran at 1000 fps.
The .22 WMR fps came in at 1,050 fps.
Again not much differences
Terminal Performances
When looking at terminal performances its about expansion.
Expansion is important because if you have two holes that are the same depth, the hole that has the largest diameter will also be the one that is likely to do the most tissue damage.
The average frontal diameter of the .22 WMR bullets is about 0.27 inches.
The 9mm Luger was at 0.55 inches.
The .45 ACP came at 0.61 inches.
The damage is translated into cubic inches of tissue.
9mm Luger = 3 cubic inches
.45 ACP = 3.79 inches
.22 WMR = 1 inch
If you’re a statistical person and just going by terminal performances, obviously you wouldn’t pick the .22 WMR as a choice to carry.
What’s misleading in the world of self-defense is that people seem to think the one shot that incapacitates normally doesn’t happen. True that the .22 WMR does not bring instant incapacitation.
But for deterrent and quick shooting a .22 WMR can still be effective to put some pain on a bad guy and to get them to stop.

Sources: Featured image & Video by Lucky Gunner

January 15th, 2018 by