Young Guns: Quality Time Together

This is Baret Fawbush, here’s a short clip of him and his son spending some quality time together.
Read the excerpt below on how he juggles training, spatial awareness, gun safety and its purpose into quality time with his child..

“Here’s my son Knox. He’s 4 years old. I REALLY want to get him into guns but the key is not to be forceful, so when he wants to go shooting with daddy, this is typically what we do. He stands behind me and holds on to me or just watches and tells me if I hit my target. You need to understand that my son is NOT scared of GUNS or GUNSHOTS.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SisNrcZsxGY
He’s actually keeping his head down because I TOLD HIM TO do that and see if he could still know where I’m at by feeling me with his hands. The goal was the have a spacial awareness of where I’m at.
That’s what he was focusing on. My job was to focus on my spatial awareness of him while I have a gun in my hand doing work.
After I put the threat down, I want to check him and make sure he’s good and then we exit. I didn’t tell him to grab a hold of my belt before the drill. The drills we did before was him grabbing onto my neck.
So when he was confused, he reverted back to what he knew was easier for him (that’s fine because we got options and we can go with the flow).
Why do I incorporate my 4 year old into these types of live fire drills. First understand that we have done this with sort pistols in the yard and in the house many of times.

Secondly we do this so he understands a serious “GO TIME” attitude when daddy pulls out his gun. Thirdly, he LOVES seeing daddy hit his target. Fourthly is to communicate loudly and efficiently.
He loves spending time with me in this way. So we keep it safe and light hearted. I’m not suggesting that you go out and do things like this with live fire.
I will suggest that you instill in your children obedience and serious drills that you can rep with them and THEN take it to live fire if you feel comfortable and if your spouse feel comfortable with it too. Don’t argue with them about doing stuff like this. If your spouse trusts you to keep your child safe.”

Sources: Barot Fawbush, Parker Fawbush Youtube

Run and Gun Defense

When you’re just plinking at the range, it’s no big deal to just stand and fire away, but in a self-defense situation, the very first thing you should do is move. Moving helps turn the tables on your attacker by forcing them to react to what you’re doing. It also makes you much harder to hit, should they decide to start shooting. You have two goals when making that shot while moving.

First, don’t trip. That might cause you to shoot yourself, or someone else.

Second: You want to keep as stable as possible shooting platform, so you can hit what you’re aiming at. The easiest way to do that is to act like a tank, but be a fast tank.

Another thing to think about is the use of airsoft (not covered in this video) to go head to head against someone. Play it out in scenario based such as street muggings, active shooter response, etc..

What are your thoughts on this type of training and let us know below in the comment section.

Video Transcription
Tom McHale: When you’re just plinking at the range, it’s no big deal to just stand and fire away, but in a self-defense situation, the very first thing you should do is move. Moving helps turn the tables on your attacker by forcing them to react to what you’re doing. It also makes you much harder to hit, should they decide to start shooting. You have two goals when making that shot while moving.

First, don’t trip. That might cause you to shoot yourself, or someone else.

Second: You want to keep as stable as possible shooting platform, so you can hit what you’re aiming at. The easiest way to do that is to act like a tank. Let’s look at how to move laterally, and forward and backward, separately.

The conventional method for lateral movement has you taking a large step to the side, and then moving your other foot partway to that step. This method is safe, deliberate, and stable. And I absolutely hate it. I don’t know about you, but if someone ever starts shooting at me, I can pretty much guarantee you that my brain isn’t going to issue such unnatural commands to my hands and feet. But you’ll have to try it out for yourself, to see if it works for you.

I prefer a more natural, but still controlled movement that I’m far more likely to adopt under stress.

Using a heel-to-toe technique, you can maintain a surprisingly stable platform while moving quickly, and minimizing the risk of tripping. Basically, you’re setting your lower body in motion in the direction you want to go. Your waist has a really nifty design feature: It can rotate. So take advantage of that. While walking heel to toe, just rotate your upper body in the direction you want to shoot.

Notice I’m not crossing my feet over one-another, which might lead to tripping. I’m walking naturally, just turning my torso towards the target, like a tank turret.

To maintain stability, plant your leading heel while your trailing toe is still on the ground. If you need to move forward or backward, the same technique can get you moving quickly without a lot of bouncing up and down. If you have access to a suitable range, try a controlled heel-to-toe walk while aiming at a stationary target. Be sure to practice moving sideways, forward, and backward, since you never know what you’ll need in a real-life situation.

So remember, if you ever have to run-and-gun, move like a tank to make that shot.

Sources: Range365

Making Its Mark On Marksmanship

[su_heading size=”30″]The Civilian Marksmanship Program is currently leading a renaissance in firearms precision and accuracy with a massive new instructional range facility and more than a thousand sanctioned matches each year.[/su_heading]

STORY BY FRANK JARDIM • PHOTOS BY TIM HEADY

[su_dropcap style=”light”]T[/su_dropcap]he acronym CMP stands for Civilian Marksmanship Program, and if it sounds familiar, that’s because it’s been around for 114 years. Once a government-funded program administered by the U.S. Army, it was reformed as a private, self-supporting, nonprofit in 1996. Its core mission is instructing the citizenry, and particularly the nation’s youth, in the principles of safe firearms handing and cultivating the knowledge and skills required for precision shooting.

The Talladega Marksmanship Park is equally impressive from the air. (CMP)
A marker explains why an Army camp is named after a Navy man.

Great shooting requires practice, and the CMP promotes that through their support of 5,000 local affiliated shooting clubs and state organizations that run CMP-sanctioned courses and competitive shooting matches across the country. That amounts to over 1,400 sanctioned matches a year attended by more than 10,000 shooters. The CMP codified the competition rules and trains and certifies the range officers who run the matches. They also train and certify master instructors who teach thousands of new shooters each year using CMP course materials in more than 100 sponsored clinics nationwide.

Through their online Competition Tracker system, they maintain the match scores for every shooter in every CMP competition, as well as a listing of all upcoming matches, making it easy for shooters to find out when and where they can compete, register for those matches, and track their progress up to the national level.

Reflecting its military roots, high-power military service rifle and service pistol competitions have always been a major component of the CMP. However, they are by no means the whole show. To paraphrase the American poet Walt Whitman, “The CMP is large. It contains multitudes.” Today, its 30 instructional and competitive programs also include air and .22 rimfire pistols and rifles.

A closer look at the Kongsberg Target System.

AN EMPHASIS ON PRECISION marksmanship is the common element is all CMP matches. These are not running-and-gunning, action-style, three-gun, speed or steel matches. CMP competitors shoot traditional bull’s-eye targets at specific distances from established positions (prone, sitting, kneeling and standing), usually with iron sights. Sometimes rifle shooters can use a sling.

Not to diminish the challenges of other shooting sports, which often pose a high level of difficulty in other methods and techniques, but the CMP fosters in its competitors
a great deal of personal discipline and technical knowledge.

Competitors prepping their gear before going to the ready line.
A Kentucky Junior Service Rifle competitor competes in a local CMP match.

The CMP high-power rifle competition, for example, with its 200-, 300- and 600-yard stages, allows shooters the chance to develop their understanding of some of the most difficult (and interesting) technical aspects of shooting. To put the bullet in the X ring, the shooter needs to understand trajectory, adjust the sights for the bullet’s drop, evaluate the wind speed and direction to calculate the required amount of windage compensation, and deal with any heat mirage that may blur the view of the distant target.

The view from the rear of the ready line during a USAMU rifle class at Camp Perry.

Akin to the “World Series” of shooting sports, the CMP holds their National Matches every summer at Camp Perry, Ohio. Bordering Lake Erie, the Camp Perry ranges are considered by many to be the largest and best in the county. Among the 6,000 participants from all the CMP disciplines, you will always find America’s finest military and civilian marksmen.

The National Matches, a tradition at Camp Perry since 1907, also include top quality training seminars for novice and advanced shooters. A newcomer to competitive shooting could attend a one- or two-day CMP– USAMU (U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit) Small Arms Firing School for rifle or pistol (or both) and learn the basics of firearms safety and marksmanship on the spot.

I HAD THE CHANCE TO TALK with CMP’s Mark Johnson to get the scoop on what accomplishments he was most excited about this year. Johnson is not the type of chief operating officer to sit behind a desk all day, evidenced by the fact that we talked by phone as he was driving back from a CMP competition in Oklahoma.

A shooter rolling with the recoil of his service rifle.

While he paid respectful homage to the National Matches, which he refers to as the CMP’s “crowning jewel,” it was the growth and success of the Junior Air Rifle Camp that he seemed to find most exhilarating. These weeklong summer camps are held around the country with a goal to teach 9- to 12-year-olds safety and marksmanship lessons of universal value. Participants bring their own equipment and the fee is a nominal $285 per youth and $50 for their adult coach. As of this writing, 14 of the 16 camps are already full.

You might be surprised to learn that the most popular competitive shooting sport among precollege boys and girls is three-position air rifle shooting. Its growth shows no sign of slowing down, so this particular competition is helping to develop our next generation of marksmen.

The U.S. Army Mobile Ordnance Maintenance truck stands by to service military and civilian competitor rifles.

But just because kids love it doesn’t make it a kid’s sport. The 10-meter, three-position (prone, kneeling and standing) competition is also an international sport and an Olympic event. In fact, those Junior Air Rifle camps that Johnson is so proud of boast multiple Olympian alumni, and two medalists, including 2016 Gold Medal winner Ginny Thrasher (see American Shooting Journal, September 2016).

The CMP actually sanctions two classes of air rifle competitions for juniors that differ only in the equipment needed. Sporting Air Rifle competition uses basic target rifles that cost $105 to $525 and requires no specialized shooting clothing. Precision Air Rifle uses Olympicgrade guns that cost $850 to $1,275 and require the full complement of target shooting clothes and accessories. By the way, those prices are from the CMP online store and represent a discounted cost only available for qualified club members.

Apparently, kids are having some success convincing their parents to let them give the less costly Sporting Air Rifle a try (or perhaps it’s the other way around), as it has become a major entry point into competitive shooting for them. Three-Position Air Rifle can be a life-long hobby and college students can compete in NCAA matches or via Junior ROTC programs as well.

Many competitors continue to use the rifle designed by the namesake of the Talladega Marksmanship Park range, John Garand

Another thing Johnson was really proud of was the CMP’s new Talladega Marksmanship Park in Talladega, Alabama. This is the third, and by far the largest, modern instructional range facility they have constructed, and it is the most technologically advanced in the world. The two others are 80-port indoor air rifle ranges at their Camp Perry, Ohio, and Anniston, Alabama, locations, where they also operate retail stores.

THE NEW MARKSMANSHIP PARK is huge, covering 500 acres, with rifle, pistol and shotgun ranges. At maximum capacity it could accommodate 3,000 shooters at once, and transportation around the ranges is provided.

The facility includes a 13,000-square-foot clubhouse with classrooms, lounge, and a Creedmoor Sports Pro Shop. Inside, visitors can follow the progress of competitors on monitors if the Alabama heat or humidity gets to be too much for them.

The park has an amazing combination 200-, 300- and 600yard rifle ranges, a 100-yard multipurpose range and a 50-yard pistol range, all equipped with state of the art Kongsberg Target System (KTS) electronic targets and scoring monitors which detect, record and display every round the shooter fires. This means you can maximize your shooting practice time because you don’t ever have to leave the firing line to change targets. You don’t even need a spotting scope. And, for fans of shotgun sports, there are trap, sporting clays and five-stand courses.

The facility plays host to the whole gamut of CMP Games and matches, including the popular GSM (Garand, Springfield, Vintage Military) matches where shooters use as-issued historic rifles. The CMP knows there’s more to shooting than just the black bull’s-eyes, so you’ll also find a wide variety of popular action shooting sports like 3-Gun, Steel Challenge and IDPA. Even better, Marksmanship Park is open to the public and charges only $20 to shoot all day.

Over the years, the CMP had often made surplus military rifles and ammunition available to qualified club members at reasonable prices. In fact, if you have ever heard that you could get a surplus M1 Garand rifle directly from the government, that’s part of the CMP program. At this point, however, virtually all of those M1 rifles and carbines, M1903 Springfield and M1917 Enfield rifles are sold out.

The good news is the profits from the sale of those historic rifles funded an endowment that will keep the CMP in operation, training new generations of marksman, for the foreseeable future.

In light of the recent shift in political control since the last election, I asked Johnson if there might be some possibility of more M1 rifles turning up. He told me that had I asked that question six months ago, the answer would be no. But since then, one of the last great stockpiles of M1s, currently held by the Philippine government, just might be making its way home from the islands.

So keep your fingers crossed, and get yourself involved with the CMPaffiliated club in your area. Only qualified club members will be able to buy these rifles should they become available. “How do I qualify,” you ask? It’s very simple. Just join a CMPaffiliated club and shot in a CMPsanctioned match.

There are plenty of targets at the Civilian Marksmanship Program’s new Marksmanship Park in Talladega, Alabama, and each shooting bay is equipped with state-of-the-art Kongsberg Target System (KTS) electronic targets and scoring monitors which detect, record and display every round the shooter fires. (CMP)

You can find vast amounts of additional information about the CMP and its great programs when you visit TheCMP.org. ASJ

Live Fire Training

This live-fire exercise may use lethal ammo or just ‘simunition’ rounds. Now ask yourself if you’d be willing to stand in the line of fire.

In this amazing look at what many tactical training exercise groups do to simulate performing under the incredible strain of live fire and worse, possible human shields, you’ll get to see not only some great shooting, but alternately some brave men acting as warm bodies in “harms way.”

Simunition, or non-lethal training ammunition, has its place in military, law enforcement, and even civilian training, but which is it?

Watch and tell us what you think:
https://www.facebook.com/glockfantasy/videos/1002791403185331/
First of all hand it to these amazing and highly skilled pros for doing what they do best and sharing it with the rest of us.

While it’s not so easy to tell if they’re using simunition or lethal rounds, what is easy to tell is how hard they train to get that darn good!

The only way you want too meet these guys is if they’re coming to rescue you, and if they have to shove you around some to do it, by God let them.

Here’s what they’re saying about this type of training, what’s your take on this?






Sources: Glock Facebook, Craig Raleigh

Fight your Way to your Gun

In a close quarters battle reaching for your gun may not be the best choice. Remember, the root word of gunfight is fight, not gun. From contact distance to about 3 feet, you can strike your adversary, hard, and use those blows to create distance and decide if you need to reach for your gun.

Using a Kubaton, marker, flashlight or other impact weapon to increase the power of your strike will provide maximum benefit to your aggressive actions. Remember, never just throw one strike. Attack in combination and keep moving to gain distance. The downside to this is that you will need to work on getting your non-dominant arm competent enough to fight.


Video Transcription
Hi I’m Kevin Michalowski, editor of Concealed Carry magazine. And you may not even get to access your firearm in an extremely close-quarters battle.

We don’t get the luxury of making sure that people stay 21 feet away from us at all times. In some cases, we end up very close together in a face-to-face confrontation. And at that point, the most interesting thing at the USCCA expo in Fort Worth, Tim Kennedy told me that at contact distance, if I tried to draw a gun, he would just beat me to death. And that got me to thinking.

At this distance, you may not be able to get to your firearm; in fact, it’s probably better if you don’t. You have to use combative techniques. That’s handfighting, or maybe an alternate weapon. This is a Sharkie. Yes, a sharkie. It’s an actual working marker made by the ColdSteel company, but it’s a glass-filled nylon tube that offers some extra strength, and really works basically as a kubaton. A short little baton to give you some added power in your strikes.

In a position like this, we don’t ever want to be directly head-on one-on-one face to face with a person. I wanna be moving off, at about a one-thirty position, or even further to the side, especially getting away from that right hand. If you think this guy’s going to punch you with a big overhand right, which is what most people who aren’t trained as fighters will do, that big roundhouse they’re going to swing at you.

In that case, at this distance, I’m not going to be reaching for my gun, that opens up my head to get punched in the side of the face. I want to deflect that incoming punch, get your hand up, block the punch, hold it up there long enough to make sure you’re not going to get hit in the head hard -you may get hit in the head, but not hard- and then drive your kubaton -your Sharkie- right down into the shoulder. Right between the collarbone right here. There’s a big pack of nerves right here in the shoulder. Drive that down in, and at the same time strike to the head. Immediately strike to the head. We don’t ever, when we’re in a combative situation, want to just use one blow and then wait and see what happens. We want a combination of blows.

So we drive it down into the collarbone, and then follow up with a strike to the face, and then you can step back and decide whether or not we want to use our firearm. Grabbing this sharkie or pen or kubaton or anything else out of your pocket is very unobtrusive. And if this person is approaching you and getting close, clearly can tell by voice inflection or something else that this is probably gonna be a bad situation, it might be time to prepare yourself for action. Pulling out a pen usually doesn’t mean anything. Now one of those tactical pens with the really sharp point on it might impale and stick into this person. In a deadly force situation that’s okay, but in what reasonable people might see as ‘just a regular fight’, you’ll want to use something that you’re really not going to stab this person with, it’s just adding an extra level to your strike. It focuses all your energy on this point, and you drive it into that band of nerves, just to get their attention. To stop their hostile activity. You may get what we call an immediate cessation of hostile activity instantly when you drive this pen down into that collarbone area. But still, follow up with that strike, and then step back. Remember, the goal of self-defense is to create enough dysfunction in your attacker to allow you to escape. In a close-quarters battle situation, you may not have to go to your firearm, you may only use comabative moves to get some distance and get away.

I’m Kevin Michalowski, Editor of Concealed Carry Magazine. If you like these videos, please share them with all your friends and subscribe to our page. I’ll give you more great information every week.

Sources: USCCA Youtube, Kevin Michalowski

How to Shoot the Barricade Drill

Check out how the younger generation make this barricade drill look so easy to do. Here’s up and coming 3 Gun competitive shooter 13 year old Jalise Williams showing us the basics of barricade shooting. She covers basic footwork, maintaining stable platform and sighting in. All of this done within seconds, yes really fast! Have a look.

https://www.facebook.com/guntalkmedia/videos/10154774150866598/
Video Transcription
[Beep] [Gunshots]

Hi I’m Jalise Williams, and today I’m gonna be teaching you how to shoot the barricade drill.

When you’re shooting a stage in a match, you will be having fault lines. You cannot step outside the fault lines while you are shooting. So that makes us, when there is a wall in front of us, makes us have to lean around it to shoot our targets. The real action in this drill is with your knees. So when you’re coming out over to shoot a target, you want your knee to be pointing out a little bit, and then you just want to bend it as much as possible so that you can see your target.

Sometimes you might need a bigger stance, sometimes you need a smaller stance, but in this drill, I’m just going to use a small stance because that is the most stable position. Let me show you how this works a little bit slower so that way you will understand better. I’m going to do this dry. So I’m going to draw, I’m going to come over, and I’m going to make sure I’ve got a stable platform, small shooting stance, and I’m going to make sure my knee is leaning out.

And then I’m going to come up onto my target, I’m going to fire two shots. Then, after I fire my two shots, I’m going to come over, and I’m going to do the same thing. I’m going to put my foot where I need it, come into a stable shooting stance, lean my knee out, acquire my sights, and fire two shots again.

[gunshots]

And that’s how you do the barricade drill.

Sources: Gun Talk Media, Springfield Armory, Jalise Williams

Here’s a Shooting Drill that you have never Tried

This is one tactical shooting drill that you probably have never seen, but it certainly brings up an interesting topic on realism in training and the engagement of moving targets.

Rob Pincus came up with this shooting drill called “Dynamic Deviation Control“. Dynamic Deviation Control is a pistol shooting drill that is designed to inculcate a shooter to engage a moving target. This is just fancy talk for saying shooting while your gun is in motion.

Keeping you gun perfectly still during precision drills on the range is one thing, but do it while in motion will be a common occurrence during a defensive event. This may be a missing key element in your shooting regimen for personal defense.

This type of drill takes your paper target shooting up to the next level.

When you consider the bulk of tactical pistol training occurs on non-moving paper targets this drill makes a lot sense. Certainly worth trying out next time you are at the range, just be careful not to drop the basic principles such as grip, stance and sight alignment when you add movement to your gun.

Sources: Rob Pincus, Rob Leatham, Andy Van Loan

Foundations of Fast Shooting

Leatham & Pincus discuss the foundation and the first steps in learning how to shoot rapidly. That first step is keeping your arms and upper body rigid while shooting rapidly. According to Leatham & Pincus the foundation of fast shooting has nothing to do with the slow easy trigger pull commonly taught by many gun schools.

But it has everything to do with pulling the trigger quickly and controlling that recoil. We do this by maintaining that strong structure when holding the pistol. There is no need to be meticulous with the trigger pull and looking concentrating on the front sights.

Theres a time and place for everything that you learn in marksmanship. The slow trigger squeeze to be accurate and the quick trigger pull when you’re under real life threatening situation. Practice both.

Video Transcription
[Shooting]

Pincus: Wow that looks really good. Every time I teach somebody how to shoot quickly, you already know how to do this, but they don’t, I wanna show them what the fundamental starting point is- what I call the foundation- for being able to shoot fast. Go ahead and unload, I need you empty. Most people’s dry-fire drill is a ball-and-dummy drill (clear) is a ball and- (stay striker-back though) So aim at the target, Rob, what i always teach ’em to do is listen, you have to hold the gun in a manner that I don’t move you. So this is pretty good right there. Any time I wanna move the gun, I want their body to move, not wrist. Wrist and joints, that’s bad, shouldn’t bend. Now the next part of it is, we teach people, ‘focus on the front sights, squeeze the trigger’, but in a real shooting environment, you realize you don’t have time to play that game. So you have to learn to pull that trigger. I can look at the target and tell you Rob can do this right. Finger on the trigger, when I say ‘now’, dryfire. Standby, ready, now! [Click] Standby, ready, now! [Click] Standby, ready, Now [Click] Ready, now [Click] So what you’ll notice on someone when they’re learning is that almost always we have that stupid jerk that controls recoil, right? So if people would quit trying to control recoil, and learn how to pull the trigger quickly, then the recoil wouldn’t become a factor. Let me explain why.

So you’re aimed in on the target, you’re ready to go. You’ve decided to shoot -remember, all the work’s done now.

Rob: Right.

Pincus: At this point, I don’t even care where your focal distance is, target, sights, as long as you see a good enough representation. Finger on the trigger, ready to fire, pull the trigger. Now! [Click] So the trick is to be able to pull the trigger rapidly. Now at any point did you see the sight move off the target?

Rob: Yes.

Pincus: Now! [click] Did it ever move off of the part?

Rob: No.

Pincus: So we don’t need any better trigger pull than that. But we think we need this fine-tuned- ‘touch the trigger, we need you to squeeeze it real careful-like, like this. [click]’ -Look how long that takes! It takes me three seconds -put your finger on- if I told you to just ‘squeeze the trigger’ I’ll start now. [Click] That’s a second! Do you know what happens in a second?!

Rob: Absolutely.

Pincus: In the competition world, I lose the match. That one second cost me the whole match. In a real environment? Something way worse happens in a second. You realize even a big guy like me, what’s the distance, I can move seven yards in a second?

Rob: Absolutely. Yeah, you know, this to me is so important, right? Now I know my fundamentals could stand to improve dramatically-

Pincus: Naw your fundamentals are good.

Rob: You’re one of the best coaches in the world, that’s what you do, I know you do it really well, but I think it’s important that people hear that the best coach in the world, when it comes to competition shooting, if he’s telling you to do that three-second trigger press in the environment of defensive shooting, probably something’s wrong.

Pincus: It can’t work! It can’t work. The whole thing- you know what’s gonna happen in three seconds? You’re not gonna be involved in the game. It’s gonna be all over and you’re gonna be a loser.

Rob: So, good enough, not perfect.

Pincus: Correct.

Rob: That’s the foundation of fast shooting.

Pincus: That’s it.

Insane Live Blade Demo

[su_heading size=”30″]The Moves are Un-Detectable[/su_heading]

There are many martial arts systems out there that teaches empty hand knife defense skills. Most of the scenario is your basic knife at the stomach, knife at the small of your back or thrusting at the stomach.

But what’s really different about this next one is what if the attacker has the knife at the neck area with the blade touching the skin. And, to make it further interesting for this training/demonstration is to have the attacker cut your neck if he senses that the defender tries to defend with a technique of some sort.

Fred Mastro is a self defense instructor from Germany, he has some great solutions for this type of knife defense. His approach is practical in sense of non economy of motion. In this case its actually about economy of techniques. For example, most self defense system would teach you to quickly go for the hand holding the knife and do a wrist lock to disarm them. So imagine in your mind as soon as the defender intitiate his movement to grab the adversary knife hand, more than likely the defender has been cut and they’re now wrestling over the blade.

Mastro shows you simple strikes at the ribs and the back of the neck to throw your adversary off, these are effective stuns that creates an involuntary reaction from the adversary to move away from the defender. Like when the doctor hits test your reflex by tapping your knees or funny bone. The beauty behind these strikes is that the attacker don’t see it coming.
Body Targets

  • Ribs
  • Back of Neck
  • Side of Thigh (Sciatic Nerve)
  • Inside of Knee

[su_heading size=”30″]Video Transcription[/su_heading]

[Fred Mastro] Ok, if you have a knife… Ok, this position. Not just to work here, because you can cut. At the same time, we need this, to have this little distance to work. Ok. After this, I love this. [Disarm]

[Director] One more time. And explain to us why he can’t stop it. May I? May I try?

[Fred] Yeah.

[Director] So, if you move, I–

[Fred] Yeah. So if I move, you cut, huh?

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred attacks]

[Director] Cut! I cut him!

[Fred] Ok. If I move, you cut.

[Fred attacks]

[Director] Cut!

[Fred] Elbow, cut.

[Director] I cut him.

[Fred] I go back, gun? Cut.

[Director] Easy.

[Fred] Ok. (to Cameraman) Go here. (To Director) I need to make a little distance, and in the same time…

[Fred Punches]

[Director] OH! [pained noises]

[Fred] Just to have a distance.

[Director] One more.

[Fred] Ok.

[Director] I’m gonna cut him.

[Fred] Yeah. Please. Ok. [Punches]

[Director gives pained noises]

[Director] (groaning) I cut him. I think I cut him.

[Fred] Ok. You know why?

[Director] Why?

[Fred] Because first time, you are like this. And second time, you are like this. [Laughter] Yeah. If you are close, yeah, get in close. Not close, this one.

[Director, grunting] Yeah.

[Fred] Very close, it’s incredible, but you have some nerve with your hands. [Fred whacks the Director, who grunts]

[Stick drops as Doug walks off in pain]

[Fred] Can you cut, Doug?

[Doug] Cut me? Ok.

[Director] No.

[Fred] You don’t see what’s happened?

[Director] No.

[Doug] You don’t see it, exactly. You don’t see it. You just– that’s the key.

[Fred] It’s mean, but it’s not these guys behind you.

[Director] You lose all intention. You lose ANY intention. You lose EVERYTHING.

[Fred] You need– for this one, is better, to feel just the end, some very close contact. Is possible [Uninteligable] With a short knife. No problem. But look the hand– [Fred attacks director] Distance. Ok?

[Director] Yeah, I pulled–

[Fred] You need this distance. The same. Here? Ok? The same move. You can see this. [Fred knees Director, Director falls, cursing quietly.] Ah, please sir. Please, please. [mock-cuts Director’s hand, laughs, helps him back up.] This one is good for camera.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] Because, is not large move. Is very close, slow motion, I don’t touch you. No, use your hand, use your hand. This. Where’s this, my body is not this, but this. And I need the distance with the knife. Slow motion.

[Director] Show me the wrong way. If you punch me the wrong way I go this way.

[Fred] Normal. If I hit you normally.

[Director] Yeah, yeah.

[Fred] Elbow is the same. The elbow is the same, if I block and I come in with the elbow, is the same.

[Director] *Bow*, *bow*, right through!

[Fred] Never punch in this situation. I saw some style of this, they come and punch– ok, but!

[Director] I’m cutting him!

[Fred] You know why? You don’t know the size of the blade. If the blade is this size, is the blade this size? Imagine a big blade, I don’t see, because this is my angle.

[Director] Yeah, oh, here. The blade’s here.

[Fred] I punch you–

[Director] *SCHTCHT* [laughter]

[Fred] Big distance with the blade. You cut the VIP. Sure. The same, here. I love -this- reaction. To have this reaction, you need to work down. Inside the knee [Fred kicks Director, Director grunts and reacts] and you have this reaction.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] Can feel the– You feel the knee.

[Director] But!

[Fred] It’s twenty per-cent. Twenty percent. Twenty percent. Sometimes, -the same- ok. I can use, I like this punch. [Fred punches Director, who grunts and doubles over again] Ok.

[Director] Phone! [laughter]

[Fred] No, you can’t say, no problem. But I break the- [laughter] But the best one is this, and this.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] And no problem, I don’t need to catch this, look. Very slow, ten percent, look, this one and this one. Ten percent. See?

[Director] It’s moving.

[Fred] Take a knife, real knife. Real knife. This is muscle. I’m sure. Take the knife. Take! Take the knife, brother. Take the knife.

[Director] [Grunts in pain, drops knife, curses]

[Fred] Twenty-five percent. Just twenty-five percent.

[Cameraman] How ‘ya doin’ there, big guy?

[Director] I was not– ok that wasn’t rehearsed, I was not comfortable with having the real knife out. Uh, not something that we would normally do or normally show, but I guess in this instance, we gotta do it man. Because the videos sometimes don’t do this shit justice, and there’s a lot of– just, just, go man. Go to a course. I dare you. I will personally give you double your money back if you ever go to like a Mastro seminar and you’re like ‘yeah this is Bullshit’. Personally. I’ll put my life on it, man. Forreal. So, uh, the usual stuff: Like, subscribe, comment, come to a class and experience it for yourself. That’s all I gotta say. Now I gotta go… fuckin’…FUCK.

Each One, Teach One

[su_heading size=”30″]There’s never been a better time to train new shooters.[/su_heading]

STORY BY ROB REED • PHOTOS BY NATIONAL SHOOTING SPORTS FOUNDATION

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]A[/su_dropcap]s a shooter, there will likely be a time when someone asks, “Can you teach me to shoot?” If you aren’t used to working with new shooters, you might not know the best way to introduce them to the sport. With that in mind, here are some tips on how to provide newbies with a safe, fun and educational range trip.

Once you’ve scheduled the trip, let the new shooter know what to expect. Discuss how to dress for the range, and why they should avoid low-cut tops and open-toed shoes. The “hot brass dance” is never amusing to the one getting burned, and trying to clear trapped brass with a firearm in hand can be dangerous.

Review the standard safety rules ahead of time so they can process them in a calm, quiet environment. You’ll reinforce the rules later at the range. I prefer the NRA’s “Three Rules of Gun Safety” but “Cooper’s Four Rules” also work.

New shooters will model your behavior, so always set a good example.
New shooters will model your behavior, so always set a good example.

Explain the importance of using eye and ear protection at the range, and make sure you have enough of both on hand for everyone. Have the new shooters “double up” hearing protection by wearing foam earplugs underneath ear muffs. This will reduce anxiety caused by the noise of shooting.

It’s not enough to recite the rules. You have to go over how they work in context by explaining what a “safe direction” is at the range, how keeping the finger off the trigger helps prevent accidental discharges, when the gun should be loaded or unloaded on the line, and why these rules still apply even to “unloaded” guns.

You should also explain that “Cease fire” means “Stop shooting now!” and review other range commands if you’re using a supervised range.

Remember that the students will model their behavior off of the example you set, so make sure to follow the best safety practices yourself.

WHILE SHOOTING CAN BE a fun social activity, it’s easy to be overwhelmed if you are overseeing too many new shooters. If you are teaching by yourself, try to limit the trip to one or two newbies, if possible. Even then, work with them one-on-one and have the person not shooting observe so they can be better prepared for their turn.

If you have a friend assisting, you should be able to handle additional new shooters if you split them between you. Remember you are there for them, not for your own shooting practice, so focus on giving them the best possible range experience.

Also, whenever possible, split up relationship-paired couples among different mentors so each half of the couple focuses on what they are doing instead of trying to “help” the other.

A first trip to the range isn’t the same as a full NRA Basic Pistol class. Keep your instruction focused specifically on what they need to know to safely handle and shoot the firearm and hit the target. Leave the more technical stuff for later. Draw them a diagram of a sight picture and make sure they understand how the drawing corresponds to the front and rear sights on the firearm.

Any session at the range should begin and end with a focus on safety.
Any session at the range should begin and end with a focus on safety.

HAVE THEM PRACTICE HOLDING and dry firing the unloaded gun, and correct any problems with their grip or stance. Enforce the “trigger off the finger until the sights are on target” rule with dryfire so they’ll get in the habit. Avoid using the term “trigger squeeze” as it can cause new shooters to tighten their entire grip as they fire. Instead, explain that their grip should be firm and consistent the whole time, and that the trigger should be pulled
straight to the rear in a deliberate, smooth motion.

Since you’ll likely need to recock the firearm to reset the trigger during dry-fire, make sure they understand that once the gun is loaded it will automatically reload and recock itself when they shoot for real. (This is obviously not the case for manually operated firearms such as bolt- or lever-action rifles).

11263014The best firearm for new shooters is a .22LR, bar none. Whether it’s a rifle or pistol, the low recoil and relatively quiet report of the rimfire make it ideal as a first-time gun. If you don’t have a .22LR available, go for the lowest recoiling firearm you do have. For handguns, a full-size gun firing standard-pressure 9mm or .38 Special loads should be easy enough to manage. For rifles, a pistolcaliber carbine or a .223 AR are good choices. This goes double for ARs with adjustable stocks that can be resized for smaller statured shooters.

For aerial shotgun shooting use loads appropriate for the sport. If you are shooting stationary targets, use light loads or reduced recoil “tactical” loads. Whatever you do,
avoid the temptation to have a laugh at someone’s expense by giving them “too much gun.” It’s not fair to the new shooter, can turn them off the sport, and is actually unsafe.

The best targets are those that react to the hits. Nothing is more fun for new shooters than watching their targets explode, fall down, or spin around. Plate racks or portable swinging or spinning targets are good choices. Just make sure to keep to minimum safe distances when shooting steel.

You can also improvise with cans, plastic cups filled with water, clay birds set up down range, or anything else that is safe and doesn’t violate range rules. Even if you are limited to paper targets, many ranges will still allow you to tape small balloons to the targets or use the brightly colored Shoot-N-C targets.

Ensure that firearms are suitable to the new shooter’s size and age.
Ensure that firearms are suitable to the new shooter’s size and age.
Teaching kids to shoot provides challenges and rewards.
Teaching kids to shoot provides challenges and rewards.

TEACHING KIDS TO SHOOT has its own challenges and rewards. Some kids learn best from their parents, while others pay better attention to unrelated adults. If nothing else, a parent should always be present whenever a child is shooting. Make sure the firearms are suitable for the physical size of the child. I prefer using bolt-action or lever-action rifles over semiautos when working with kids so the shooter has to manually work the action to load the next round. Pay particular attention to their energy level, as their attention and safety consciousness can start to slip as they get tired. While it’s important to stay positive with any new shooter, that goes double for kids. Start and end critiques with positive statements and focus on the fun.

Now that you’ve learned some tips on taking new shooters to the range there is no better time to do so than right now. The NRA Mentor Program offers additional resources to help you promote the shooting sports by taking new shooters to the program. Whether you are a NRA member or not, you can help grow our sport by mentoring a new shooter.

For more information about the program, visit nrapublications.org/mentor. ASJ

A shooter’s first trip to the range should be safe, fun and educational.
A shooter’s first trip to the range should be safe, fun and educational.