competition Archives - Page 2 of 3 -
October 6th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

On October 2nd, 2016, the Cowboy Fast Draw Association (CFDA) crowned their new World Champions. Approximately 250 competitors from across the U.S., Canada, and Europe traveled to Fallon, Nevada to compete in CFDA’s Signature Event, The Fastest Gun Alive – World Championship of Cowboy Fast Draw.

T.J. Vonfedlt a.k.a. Oregon Ranger, of Portland, OR, age 19, won his third Fastest Gun Alive – Men’s Overall World Championship by being the first repeat men’s champion in the sport’s history. He also made history in 2011 by winning the men’s overall championship at age, 14, which was covered by the Outdoor Channel’s, Shooting U.S.A. T.J. earned the Top Seed in the Magnificent 7 Finals in the regular rounds of the tournament and held off all challengers. He finally defeated last year’s Top Seed, Clay Janes a.k.a. Tin Bender of Caldwell, ID in the best 3 out of 5 final bout, with a time of .335, slightly over 1/3 of a second.

Jennifer Guerra a.k.a. Kiss-N-Tell, of Alta Loma, CA, won her first Fastest Gun Alive – Ladies’ Overall World Championship. She defeated the current Ladies National Champion Jamie Damrel a.k.a. Plain Jane of Vidor, TX in the final round with a .475, or just under ½ second. About 1/3 of CFDA’s members are women.

In the Youth Division, Michael Dobbins a.k.a. Blind Billy, of Powhatan, VA, defeated current National Youth Champion Jayden Eilrich a.k.a. Sheriff Rango of Fernley, NV with a final shot of .532.

In the Sport of Cowboy Fast Draw, authentic reproductions Colt .45 SAA six-guns are used with 1800’s period-correct leather holsters. Special wax bullet ammunition is used where the wax bullets are actually achieving the same velocity as live ammunition, but are stopped dead in their tracks by nothing more than archery netting. Digital electronic timers are used which illuminate LED start signals at the center of each target, from which the shooters react to their start light, draw, fire, and if their wax bullet strikes the target a time is recorded that is accurate to within 1/1000ths of a second. Firearms are never pointed at another person, instead the shooters stand side by side and face the 24 inch round-targets placed 24 feet downrange.

The format of the man vs man elimination tournament is managed by the CFDA Computer Scoring System, which draws the bouts and pairs the one on one match-ups by luck of the draw throughout the regular rounds of the tournament. In each round, the first of the two matched competitors to win 3 shots against their opponent wins that round and the defeated opponent receives an “X”, when a competitor receives 4-X’s they are eliminated from the tournament. Once the tournament is down to the Top 7 men, ladies, and youth on Saturday, they are seeded into a unique double-progressive elimination final format called, The Magnificent 7 Finals which begin at High Noon on Sunday, with hundreds of spectators cheering for their favorites.

Safety is always first! CFDA has a Youth Safety Training Program (begins at age 8) and a CFDA Range Officer Certification Program. One of the organization’s primary goals, “To educate as many people as possible in the safe and proper use of firearms.” CFDA is an NRA Affiliated Organization and has almost 5,000 members joining in the fun and thrill of the competition that is based upon, “The Romance and Legend of the Old West”. Members dress in western-themed clothing and adopt an alias which they compete under in the spirit of the old west. About 80 CFDA Affiliated Clubs exist coast to coast in the U.S. and are speading to Canada, Europe, Australia, and even Japan. CFDA was founded in Deadwood, SD and moved its annual world championship to Fallon, NV in 2008, and is sponsored by the Fallon Tourism & Convention Authority. Also among their major sponsors are Ruger Firearms, Pietta of Italy, Taylor’s & Co., and Mernickle Holsters.

For more information please go to: www.CowboyFastDraw.com or write to Cowboy Fast Draw Association – P.O. Box 5 – Fernley, NV 89408

Posted in Media Releases Tagged with: , , , ,

October 4th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]A[/su_dropcap]pproaching the final matches of 2016, Team Armalite is consistently finding their place on the podiums. Lead by Team Captain Greg Jordan, Team Armalite has found itself on the podium at the FN 3 Gun Championship and NRA World Shooting Championship.

(Greg Jordan)

(Greg Jordan)

For the third time in four years, Greg Jordan took home the win at the FN 3 Gun Championship. Known as one of the only matches in the season that incorporates fast technical bay stages with longer rugged, natural terrain type stages, Jordan is somewhat of an expert of this event. “This year was no different than any other in my strategy – the fast bays require shooters to strategize to save every available second while the natural terrain stages required finding the perfect spot to engage the targets” said Jordan. After a grueling 10 stages with the Army’s Daniel Horner hot on his tail, Jordan managed to keep his head in the game and his Armalite M15 Competition Rifle with Nexus Ammunition on target, walking away with a first place finish.

The NRA World Shooting Championship is known for featuring a wide variety of disciplines with firearms provided by top manufacturers for each stage. This year’s event included an Armalite 3 Gun Stage and Surgeon Rifles PRS Long Range Challenge, both products and events that Jordan is familiar with. “Every year I look forward to competing in the NRA World Championship. You sign up, show up to the range with your eyes and ears – with your fingers crossed! It is one of the best ways to test a competitors raw shooting ability using unfamiliar weapons in several different shooting disciplines” explains Jordan. After two days of shooting the 12 event stages, Jordan walked away with a 2nd place overall finish, and 1st place in Stock Pro.

(John Mouret)

(John Mouret)

Team Armalite’s John Mouret competed in the Southern Utah Practical Shooting Range’s LEO 3 Gun National Championships over the weekend. The event features Law Enforcement from all over the United States. Mouret shot his stock Armalite M15TAC16 and Nexus Ammunition a total of 12 individual and 6 team stages, resulting in a team win in Patrol Division, 3 rd place individual patrol division, and a 4th place overall finish.

About Armalite: Armalite is the originator of the legendary AR-10 rifle. For 60 years, Armalite’s commitment to excellence has made our firearms the choice of military, law enforcement and sport shooters worldwide. Armalite has one of the broadest product lines in the firearms industry. They manufacture semi-automatic rifles in 5.56mm and 7.62mm calibers, as well as long range bolt action rifles in .308 Winchester, 300 Winchester Magnum, .338 Lapua, and 50 BMG. Armalite is a subsidiary of Strategic Armory Corps. For more information on the company and products, visit: www.armalite.com.

About Nexus Ammo: Nexus Ammo provides discerning shooters high impact solutions through unparalleled, patent-pending automation processes. The “Nexus Method” meticulously produces ammunition to exact tolerances equal to the attention of hand loading. Our unique machinery and automation allows us to build ammunition to exact specifications, starting with the raw materials. This method is proven to provide a consistency in weight in every cartridge, delivering the quality and ballistic performance you can rely upon.

You can depend on Nexus Ammo to deliver a full ballistic spectrum of ammunition performance for your tactical, defense, or hunting needs. When you require consistency, accuracy, and repeatability… Nexus is your solution. For more information on the company and products, visit: www.nexusammo.com.

(Greg Jordan)

(Greg Jordan)

About Strategic Armory Corps: Strategic Armory Corps was formed with the goal of acquiring and combining market-leading companies within the firearms industry. Each company that is brought into the SAC family fulfills a consumer need with their brand of niche products. To date, four highly respected manufacturing companies have been acquired with a fifth in the start-up phase. These companies strategically fit together to form a strong base of products and services that are designed to meet the expectations of military, law enforcement, commercial groups, and individual users around the world.

 

Posted in Media Releases Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

July 24th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″]An Interview with Tim Norris, Volquartsen Firearms Pro Shooter[/su_heading]

INTERVIEW BY RAYLEE MELTON PHOTOGRAPHS BY TERRY DALTON, FAST FIVE PHOTOGRAPHY

[su_dropcap style=”light” size=”5″]T[/su_dropcap]he popularity of shooting competitions can be dated back hundreds of years. There is just something about the thrill of competition and improving your shot under pressure. With the 2016 season well underway we wanted to catch up with pro shooter Tim Norris to find out how to get started, found a sponsor and ideas on what equipment to use.
American Shooting Journal Tell us about some of your competition success.

Tim Norris I was in the top five for the Ruger and NSSF Rimfire Challenge World Championships from 2008 to 2014. I was also the 2013 Briley West Coast Steel Championship rifle champion.

ASJ How did you get started in shooting?

TN I was 8 years old the first time I pulled a trigger. I was on a family camping trip in the mountains just outside of Phoenix, Ariz. My father put a 1911 in my hands, helped me support it and bang! It was the greatest thrill of my life up to that point, and I was forever hooked.

ASJ So, your parents clearly encouraged you?

TN Yes. My parents saw how much I enjoyed it and knew how important it was for me to learn firearm safety and discipline. They enrolled me in a hunter-safety course. Then it got good. My Christmas gifts between the ages of 9 and 10 were firearms: a .410 shotgun, .22 rifle and .22 pistol. I still have those guns today, and every time I handle them they bring back fond memories.

ASJ What made you want to continue?

Tim Norris 2

Tim Norris is a professional competition shooter for Volquartsen Firearms, and is adept in numerous shooting disciplines. Here he takes aim with a Volquartsen Ultralight rifle and 4½-inch Scorpion pistol.

TN When I was 18, I joined the US Navy and spent six years on active duty. The Navy is where I was introduced to a new world of really fun firearms, from the M14 to the M2 Browning and everything in between.

ASJ Thank you for your service, Tim! When did you decide you wanted to compete?

TN In 1988 I joined a local club that ran a combat-pistol match every month. Combat shooting, as it was referred to in less politically correct times, was still a fairly new sport and as such was still evolving rapidly. Back then there were few veteran shooters, let alone pros around to draw experience from, so I just had to jump in with both feet and hope for the best.

ASJ What was your first competition like for you?

TN My first tournament-level competition was the 1991 World Speed Shooting Championships, and it was intimidating. Back then you would pick up the leading shooting magazines and read about the pros and world championship events, and it looked like a lot of fun. The problem was that I didn’t have a clue what it took to compete, so again as before, I jumped in head first and hoped that the water was deep enough, but not too deep.

ASJ What did you learn from your first event?

TN At the first Steel Challenge, there were 30 pros and the other 250 competitors were just like me. Most of us who shoot competitively started just like this, and we continue to compete for the love of the sport. It has become less daunting after a few trips to the shooter’s box. Even though we were novices we had a reliable support network.

ASJ What type of events have you competed in over the years?

TN Over the years, I have shot many different kinds of competition, but I am most active in NSSF Rimfire Challenge, United States Practical Shooting Association – pistol and rifle – and 3-Gun. I love to compete because it pushes me to improve, and I get to hang out with some of the greatest people around.

ASJ When did you get sponsored?

TN In 2009 I realized a lifelong goal of becoming a sponsored shooter and have been on the Volquartsen Firearms team ever since. One of the best side effects of being sponsored is the ability to teach clinics for novice shooters to help them enter the world of competitive shooting.

Tim Norris

ASJ It’s great that you take the time to help others. I know you said you are very involved with the NSSF Rimfire Challenge. I have heard wonderful things about those events. It is a .22 rifle and pistol program created to introduce new people to the shooting sports and provide a pathway to competition. Everyone will want to know what types of firearms you shoot with and why.

TN I use a 4½-inch Volquartsen Scorpion pistol with a custom Volquartsen compensator, a C-MORE Systems railway dot sight with an 8-minute dot. The sight is attached to a Bearcave Manufacturing 90-degree mount. The pistol has Hogue 1911 stocks that are modified to fit, and the magazines have a VC spring-loaded magazine ejector. My rifle is a Volquartsen Ultralight with a Boyd SS Evolution stock, C-MORE Systems RTS red-dot sight with a 3-minute dot. The sight is mounted scout-rifle style on the front end of a VC Picatinny scope mount and has an Alchin Gun Parts rimfire rifle compensator. I shoot Fiocchi 22FHVCRN high-velocity ammo.

ASJ Thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us today, Tim. Keep us in the loop on your progress – we will be watching.

TN Will do. Thank you.
Editor’s note: If you have questions for Tim Norris, please send them directly to raylee@volquartsen.com.

Posted in Competitions Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

June 28th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″]Youth Pistol Competitor Emily Robinson Steps Into The Next Arena[/su_heading]

STORY BY EMILY ROBINSON * PHOTOGRAPHS BY RODNEY ROBINSON

[su_dropcap style=”light” size=”5″]I[/su_dropcap] have always been a pistol shooter. Even the first time I was out on the range, I loved everything about shooting, from the smell of the gunpowder to the sound the steel makes when it is hit by a bullet. I think that’s what got me hooked on competitive shooting. I was 9 years old when I attended and watched my first Glock Sport Shooting Foundation (GSSF) match in Columbia, S.C., and my whole family attended to see what it was all about.

The second match I attended was the GSSF annual shoot in Conyers, Ga., and although I did not shoot in that match, I was allowed to borrow a Glock with a .22 conversion and shoot the plate rack. Right after this event, my parents bought my brother and me a Glock 17 and I actually competed in my first match two months later. I loved how everyone was so friendly, supportive and helpful. Since I was so small, people gave me advice on how to hold the gun, my stance and other tips. Some of the people who helped me that day have become longtime friends and are now like a second family. After several years of shooting GSSF matches all over the Southeast, it was a natural progression to move to United States Practical Shooting Association (USPSA).

Shooting an shotgun

During her first 3-Gun challenge, the pistol portion was second nature to Robinson. It was the rifle and shotgun segments where she felt she had a learning curve to conquer.

MY FIRST USPSA MATCH was the North Carolina Sectional in 2012. I had never even been to a USPSA match, nor had I ever practiced for anything like it. It was all new, and I was even a little intimidated. It was so much fun watching everyone on my squad shoot during their round, but when it was my time to shoot, I felt like a deer in the headlights. After I completed the first stage, I was a little surprised at how well I had done. I was really slow, but the accuracy was there and that was most important to me at that time. Just as I had been taught in GSSF, accuracy was first on the priority and speed would eventually come, and that’s exactly what happened. To date, I have won three state-level titles in USPSA.

posing with AR

If you ever have an opportunity to meet this tall young lady with the most charming country accent you have ever heard as we have, don’t be fooled by it! She is a powerful competitor and is taking the competition circuit by storm – all of them.

After three and a half years of USPSA and even longer in GSSF, I got the itch to try 3-Gun. I had met so many people who shot 3-Gun that I really wanted to give it a try. Since I had not worked with shotguns or rifles very much, there was definitely a learning curve. When it was time to get started, I had to gather equipment and get it ready. For Christmas I received a Mossberg JM930, which can be used for 3-Gun right out of the box, so that was a great surprise. Then I had the amazing experience of attending the SHOT Show for the first time in 2016. I set up appointments with several potential sponsors, one of which was NightForce, which turned out to be huge for me. Coincidentally, my interviewer had been a range officer and fellow production shooter at the Georgia State USPSA Championship, so he had heard of me. He gave me a chance and supplied me with an awesome NightForce NXS 1-4×24 optic and mount even though I hadn’t yet shot a 3-Gun match.

Similar to my first USPSA match, I had never attended a 3-Gun match. The closest I had come to seeing one was on TV, and I was really excited but nervous. I had enough time to shoot about 100 rounds through my shotgun and get my rifle zeroed from the 100-yard line with my new NightForce optic. I was dead-on within 10 rounds. Awesome optic! I also shot a few rounds on the move to try to get comfortable. My Glock 34 would round out my 3-Gun trio. Items such as shotgun-shell carriers and rifle-magazine pouches were borrowed from friends, but I felt just about ready.

During initial course walk-through at her first 3-Gun event, Robinson’s nervousness began to subside as she realized the many similarities with USPSA, with which she was much more familiar.

During initial course walk-through at her first 3-Gun event, Robinson’s nervousness began to subside as she realized the many similarities with USPSA, with which she was much more familiar.

THE DAY HAD ARRIVED and it was time for my first 3-Gun match. I arrived at the range and everything was new. I’d never been to this facility, didn’t know very many people there and the stages looked longer and more complicated than pistol stages. My nervousness subsided as I watched a few people walk the stages. I realized that the stage prep is pretty much the same as in pistol matches. You have to understand the layout of the stage and the stage brief, then develop a plan that works for you. I talked to a few people about their stage plans, and once I broke the stages down between the three weapons, everything seemed to fall into place. I wasn’t worried about the pistol stages, and I knew I would just have to slow down a little on the rifle and shotgun.

I knew the rifle and shotgun were going to be obstacles due to my lack of trigger time. The match started off a little rocky. My shotgun magazine spring created a problem that stopped my rounds from feeding into the chamber. One of the match directors had an extra spring that I borrowed and fixed the problem – another example of how great people are in the shooting sports! By the second stage I started to feel more comfortable, and overall felt that I did pretty well.

During her third 3-Gun round, which included four long-range rifle targets set at 55, 110, 160 and 210 yards, Robinson hit each target on the first try, except for the 210-yarder. After her first miss, she remembered to compensate for the distance and nailed it on the second try.

The last stage was probably my best. It started with three pepper poppers that threw clays into the air. These are reactive steel targets that fall to the ground when you shoot them, and as soon as they hit the ground they throw a clay pigeon into the air as a secondary moving target. I’d never shot clays like that before, but I hit them all. I even had to do a pick-up shot on one of them and still got it in the air! The next string was a pistol stage, which I shot on the move to make up some time. After that, there were four long-range rifle targets at 55, 110, 160 and 210 yards. It was time to really test that rifle zero. I set up for the shots, took a long breath and exhaled and fired the first shot. Hit! The next two shots were both hits. My confidence was pretty high. I fired at the 210-yard target and missed. I remembered to adjust for distance using my optic and fired again. Hit! I was so proud of myself. I was pretty happy with how I did on that stage especially. There were several things I had never encountered but I worked through them. In the end, I had no misses and no penalties. My time wasn’t the greatest because I wanted to make sure I was safe and my hits were all good, but I was pretty happy with my results.

Holding 2 AR's

After her first 3-Gun competition, Robinson came away feeling great about the experience and knew where she had made mistakes. She says that in the future, she will pay more attention to how other shooters set up for their rounds.

IF I COULD HAVE CHANGED anything about my first match, I would have paid more attention to other competitor’s stage plans and applied what I observed to my own. It was a lot different than I had expected, but overall I expected to make mistakes since this was my first 3-Gun. I got a little aggravated with myself over simple mistakes, but I will learn from them!

One of the similarities between 3-Gun, USPSA and GSSF are the people. These are some of the friendliest, supportive and helpful people you will find anywhere. The people on my squad offered help throughout the entire day, and I really appreciated that.

MY ADVICE for anyone looking into 3-Gun or any shooting sport is to be confident when you go out there. If you need help or equipment, just ask. Ninety-nine percent of the time someone will be there to help, whether you know them or not. Even if it’s your first match, match directors and range officers will walk you through it to get you started. One thing I’ve learned about the shooting world is that someone will always be there to lend a helping hand.

Everyone is new at some point and no one started out as a pro. All you have to do is apply hard work and dedication, and have fun. You can learn something from everyone on the range, whether it’s your first match or you’ve been doing it for 20 years. It’s all in the way you look at things. ASJ

Emily Robinson is an avid youth shooter who first started competing in Glock Sport Shooting Foundation matches, worked her way to United States Practical Shooting Association matches and is now tackling 3-Gun competitions.

Emily Robinson is an avid youth shooter who first started competing in Glock Sport Shooting Foundation matches, worked her way to United States Practical Shooting Association matches and is now tackling 3-Gun competitions.

 

Posted in Women and guns Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

April 6th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″]Colt Competition Rifle With Modern Flair[/su_heading]

 

There are competition rifles, there are pretty rifles and then there’s the Colt CRP-18 GunGoddess rifle, a perfect blend of both performance and elegance!colt crp 18 full handguard
This eye-catching rifle offers all the features of the standard CRP-18, with a feminine touch – an exclusive, custom-designed, filigree handguard and a choice of eight Cerakote colors.

“As more women become gun owners and as they participate in the shooting sports in growing numbers, manufacturers will be challenged to meet their needs with functional, high-quality products,” says Athena Means, president of GunGoddess.com.
“While aesthetics matter, it’s not just about making it pretty. It’s about providing a product that performs.”colt crp 18 full

The CRP-18 is competition ready right out of the box, with features including a match-grade, stainless-steel barrel, a Geissele two-stage trigger and a patent-pending finger-adjustable gas block. Colt guarantees accuracy, and tests each rifle to ensure a 3-shot group of 1 inch or less at 100 yards.

The GunGoddess CRP-18 is available exclusively at GunGoddess.com, both to consumers and dealers. Orders can be placed by phone at (866)957-1117 or online here!

 

Posted in Media Releases Tagged with: , , , , , ,

April 6th, 2016 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”30″ margin=”0″]From Hobby To Hotseat[/su_heading]

Northwest Action Works is a newcomer to the precision firearms custom rig creation world, but that doesn’t mean they don’t have their targets dotted and  their hairs crossed. Their humble roots but high quality standards have given them the tools they need to create some truly impressive rifles for considerably less than most other custom shops. Why do they do this? We asked NAW founder Mason Watters how he got started, and what he is doing to shake up the industry as a newcomer.

 

American Shooting Journal How did Northwest Action Works LLC get started and what inspired you?

NAW is just starting to get its feet wet with the Precision Rifle Series, and with three shot groups like this from a .308 Win Rough Rider Custom Rifle Package at 100 yards using 168-grain Federal Gold Medal Match, they will soon be swimming.

NAW is just starting to get its feet wet with the Precision Rifle Series, and with three shot groups like this from a .308 Win Rough Rider Custom Rifle Package at 100 yards using 168-grain Federal Gold Medal Match, they will soon be swimming.

Mason Watters We started this company on accident. We weren’t able to afford the often high prices associated with custom rifles, so we started building our own. Over time and after several builds for friends and ourselves, we started to get pretty good. When we first became an official business, we thought it would only be a side job. We primarily just sold components. The next thing we knew we had custom-barreled actions and complete rifle orders coming in. We quickly had to adapt and it turned into a fulltime operation. We decided that in order to focus solely on the company, we had to maintained a goal of bringing only a line of high-quality products to the market at prices we felt were fair to us and our customers.

ASJ What would you say is your best product or strength?

MW All of our rifles and barreled actions come with a ½ minute of angle accuracy or better – guaranteed! With high-quality loads and steady hands, these actions are capable of much better, and it is not uncommon to see ragged or even single-hole groups at 100 yards, or bullet impacts stacking on top of each other at longer range steel gongs. Many of our customers are outstanding shooters and report some incredible feats of marksmanship.

NAW has a standing ½ minute of angle or better guarantee. Here is a 7mm Rem Mag Ramrod Hunter three-shot group from 100 yards with 180-grain Berger VLD.

NAW has a standing ½ minute of angle or better guarantee. Here is a 7mm Rem Mag Ramrod Hunter three-shot group from 100 yards with 180-grain Berger VLD.

ASJ How are you involved with the nation’s fastest growing shooting sport, the Precision Rifle Series?

MW We are actually just getting our feet wet with PRS. We have put together several rigs for people getting into practical competitions, and recently expanded our lineup to include a wider range of tactical-style, custom-rifle packages, each of which have a number of features and options that can be configured into an ideal competition rig.

ASJ Have you released anything new, or do you have anything in the works?

MW Yes! We have a new rifle package called the PMR Tactical, and we’re very excited about it. While this is our most entry-level package in price, it features performance traits that make it anything but entry level. It comes with our ½ MOA or better guarantee, as well as several upgrade options that make it a truly customized first rig without breaking the bank.

ASJ It’s been great talking to you. We support your efforts and look forward to seeing what you come up with next.

MW Thank you. ASJ

Editor’s note: For more information on Mason Watters or Northwest Action Works, visit nwactionworks.com.

Northwest Action Works has just released their entry-level precision package, the PMR Tactical 6.5 Creedmoor. (NORTHWEST ACTION WORKS)Northwest Action Works has just released their entry-level precision package, the PMR Tactical 6.5 Creedmoor. (NORTHWEST ACTION WORKS)

Posted in Industry Tagged with: , , , , , ,

July 7th, 2015 by AmSJ Staff

Interview With Mark Gordon

Owner of Short Action Customs

Precision Rifle Series

 Interview by Steve Joseph

Short Action Customs (2)

Bartlein 30 cal, 1 to 10-inch twist, M40 contour barrel, chambered in .308WIN, cut down to 24 inches and threaded 5/8 x 24 with SAC’s custom thread protector.

The American Shooting Journal spoke with Mark Gordon, owner and founder of Short Action Customs. They build precision rifles specifically designed for the ultimate in discerning and elite shooters. Gordon is also the lead sponsor for today’s top Precision Rifle Series shooter David Preston. Here is what Gordon had to say:

American Shooting Journal How did you first get involved with the Precision Rifle Series?

Mark Gordon I got started with PRS as a precision-rifle builder to see what our rifles would have to go through. Most importantly, it was to see what the shooters demanded out of their rifles and what they needed to be successful. The bottom line is these rifles have to work every time without fail, be extremely accurate and practical to use in the field.

Short Action Customs (3)

Manners T5A right-hand stock with a signature SAC rifle-pillar bedding, and finished with desert-digital camo from Custom Gun Coatings.

ASJ What is it that is creating such explosive growth with competition precision shooting?

Short Action Customs (1)

An MMI Tru-Tec Melonite action and bolt, which prevents any galling of the metal and increases lubricity.

MG I believe it’s because these shooters have a desire to be proficient with their equipment and they want to know their limits. With a mixture of classic prone shooting and demanding positional shooting, the competitors are exposed to a large spectrum of disciplines at these matches. Lastly, the best place to do that is under strict time limits and lots of stress while other competitors watch. With many more club and national-level matches popping up all over the country, you can expect the sport to grow exponentially.

 

ASJ You currently sponsor the number one shooter in PRS. Tell us more about how that happened.

MG We started our first rifle build for David Preston in early 2014 after developing a relationship with him from previous PRS matches. At that time, Preston was familiar with our rifles and what they were capable of. Luckily for me he wasn’t shooting for a team at the time. We spoke on a few occasions, and I offered him a position on our team. After many rounds fired, rifles rebarreled and matches shot, Preston really started shooting to his potential. We do our very best to keep reliable and accurate rifles in the hands of PRS shooters so they can do their job.

Short Action Customs (6)

Short Action Customs Alpha 11 action with an integral 20 MOA scope base, an integral recoil lug and an M16 extractor. The magazine well is cut for Accuracy International AW magazines.

ASJ Your company, Short Action Customs, builds a lot of custom rifles. What is your favorite build?

MG There are two types of rifle builds that we love doing the most. The first is when a customer tells us to just do what we think is best. This allows us to take all of the leading-edge technology and components that we would use on our own builds and build the rifle we would want. It is great to have that kind of trust and confidence with our customers.

The second type of rifle build that we enjoy is when customers have us build rifles using components from manufacturers that we have not been exposed to. The parts industry is growing so fast, and as with any rifle build, it’s only going to be as good as the foundation it’s built on. So we really enjoy working with new components and learning about all the latest products.

Short Action Customs (4)

Timney 520 Calvin Elite trigger with an Accu-Shot BT17 bipod rail and a their model BT10LW17 quick-detach bipod.

My personal favorite rifle build is configured to be agile, medium weight and run smoothly. We run Defiance Machine integral scope base and recoil lug actions called the Alpha 11, Manners Composite Stocks T6A 100 percent carbon-fiber stocks and Remington Varmint-contoured barrels from Bartlein Barrels. We typically finish these rifles with custom paint from Custom Gun Coatings. ASJ

Editor’s note: You can visit Short Action Customs at shortactioncustoms.com.


 

Posted in Long Guns Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,