Are Snipers the Ultimate Cool Soldier?

In a segment from National Geographic Ultimate Soldiers we look at one of snipers attribute, that is “mind control“. A well-trained sniper uses mind over matter to control his own physiology. A situation that many snipers find themselves in the middle east is operating in a hot climate.

In this test to highlight a long range precision shooter ability to shoot between heartbeat. Researchers build a sniper coffin with a gun port, 100 feet away sits a target. Increasing the heat temperature is another simulation to increase the stress on the sniper. Increased heat can raise your heart rate and with longer period exposed can instill dehydration. See how cool this sniper does on this test.

Video Transcription
Doug: Ok, today we’re gonna be doing some Sniper testing, and we have secured the services of a United States Marine Corps Scout Sniper, who is still operational, and he’s gonna be wearing a balaclava, and for that reason, we’re going to introduce him only as Mike.

Narrator: Mike’s missions are so critical, we must obscure his identity for the test.

Mike: One quiet professional, at the right place, at the right time, can end wars before they start. One shot, one kill. Marine Scout Sniper.

Doug: Well what we’ve done here is, we’ve made a sniper coffin. We’ve got over here this plexiglass box, and we’re gonna put you in this box. It’s got a gunport right here, you’ll put your gun through the gunport, and you’ll be shooting at a target 100 feet away. Explain to me this ‘pulling a trigger off between heartbeats’ thing.

Mike: You can feel your heartbeat basically rebounding off the surface that you’re resting on.

Doug: And I guess you’re just timing the shot between the beats that you’re already feeling.

Mike: Yes.

Doug: Now you’ve operated over in the middle-east, right? So you’re used to the heat.

Mike: Correct.

Doug: Ok.

Narrator: To test the sharpshooter’s breaking point under the combat conditions of the Middle East, the Fight Science crew will raise the stakes, and the temperature.

David Sandler: Extreme heat does a lot to the body. Obvious things like dehydration are some of the first things that come to mind, and that of course increases heart rate, breathing rate–”

Doug: Pretty hot in there, David?

David: It’s up at 130 degrees. It’s right up there.

Narrator: Doug Martin assembles the safety team, and reviews the dangers of firing live rounds in the Lab.

Doug: Shooting guns indoors is not exactly a safe endeavour. Eyes and ears. Everybody needs to have eye protection on, if there is a safety violation or if there is an emergency where there’s an injury, I’ll call Ed in, the medic– alright, let’s have a safe shoot.

Narrator: The sniper wears a bio-harness to monitor his heart rate and breathing, so the scientists can measure his performance under extreme combat conditions. He will also be swallowing a pill that measures his core body temperature.

Mike: I was a little worried, swallowing a white pill before they throw me in a box called a Sniper Coffin.

Narrator: High-tech thermal imaging will project the sniper’s core body temperatures onto a monitor, so scientists can track his vitals. If his core temperature rises, so will his heart rate, leaving him less time to shoot between beats.

Doug: You know what’s interesting is, under all this stress your heart rate’s still nice and baseline, nice and mellow.

Narrator: The sniper’s been in the 130 degree heat chamber for 20 minutes. His core temperature has risen by one degree, but he’s not focusing on the heat, he’s focusing on his breathing.

Doug: Ok, this is a live shot!

David: Now we’re gonna see if we can distinguish truth from legend, and see if a sniper can actually shoot between heartbeats.

Doug: Three, two, one, fire.

[Shot]

Doug: Weapon on safe?

Mike: Yeah.

Doug: Whew! Ok, wanna see how you did?

Mike: Yeah.

Doug: Alright, can you run the high-speed please? Phew! Nice. Nicely done!

Narrator: The shot is dead-on. An easy distance for a sniper, but was it between heartbeats?

David: Well you actually did it, and our rhythm shows it smack between heartbeats, like you had it perfectly timed.

Mike: I was able to keep my heart rate under control by relaxing, diaphragmatic breathing, clearing your mind, thinking about nothing but what’s right around you.

Narrator: So how did Mike shoot between heartbeats? In the 130-degree coffin, Mike’s heart beats 135 times per minute. With each beat, a surge of blood fills the vessels. As the blood reaches the trigger finger, it swells with each pulse. This pulse is enough movement to cause a slight deviation in the sniper’s shot, making the difference between a direct hit, or a missed target. To pull off an accurate shot, Mike must slow down his heart rate. First he decreases his respiratory rate, by taking extended full-diaphragmatic breaths. He gradually reduces his breathing from eighteen breaths per minute to approximately six. within a few minutes, he lowers his heart rate to eighty-four beats per minute. This creates more time to shoot between heartbeats. Timing is everything. Immediately after Mike feels his heartbeat reverberate off the surface he’s resting on, he pulls the trigger. Shooting his weapon between beats, and hitting his target dead-on.

Sources: National Geographic Youtube

RTH Firearms Releases The First of Its Kind Semi-Auto Produce for Performance for Hunting and Competition

RTH Firearms CEO Ralph Hicks explains their amazing semi-auto’s.

 

Like most I have been a firing situation where a quick follow-up shot is needed. The circumstances all vary: It could be because you are having to make multiple shots at differing ranges in a competition, the game animal went from standing to running, or the rapid advancement of enemy combatants. Having the ability to rapidly follow-up is only one element; the other two elements are precision and power. The Anvil series of rifles by RTH Firearms provides the ability at any moment to produce speed, power, and precision. And if you going to own a rifle that performs like a Ferrari it should look like one too.

The New Year bought many blessings to all of us, it is also when RTH Firearms released their first semi-automatic rifle chambered in 6.5x47mm Lapua, 6.5mm Creedmoor and .308 Win. The rifle achieves amazing precision, hitting sub-sub MOA at 100 yards with the ability to reach out to 1,400 yards with little felt recoil. The Anvil rifles feel like you’re shooting a 22 rimfire rifle but yet with the 6.5×47 Lapua round allows to make mile long shots.

 

RTH Firearms hasfive goals in producing their beautiful rilfes: : Precision, speed in follow-up shots, knock-down power, minimal felt recoil and attractive design.

 

There are some fine semi-autos on the market today but they rarely achieve sub-MOA performance, and most cannot feed precision rifle cartridges. We know that precision rifle shooters are very familiar with the Lapua 6.5 x 47mm and 6.5mm Creedmoor cartridges — both have flat trajectories and each cartridge retains a very high rate of kinetic energy downrange, providing both competition rifle shooters and hunters with the range and power they need. And unlike many other 6mm cartridges, these calibers are gentle on the barrel, providing a much longer barrel life. We wanted our rifle to feed both hunting and competition rounds — and we offer your favorite cartridges upon request. Our thinking was that if we could make a 6.5 x 47 Lapua work in a semi-auto, we could make all other cartridges work as well.

 

This means we had to design a unique and precise gas impingement system with low tolerances that aligned perfectly with the bolt carrier group. We had to develop our own barrel approach in order to match the very tight tolerances of the upper receiver and contour the barrel to allow it to flow to the titanium muzzle break. Our triggers are like no other — they really give you that tactical feeling and bring to mind the classic statement, “It feels like I just broke glass.” The reset is also super-fast.

 

I put together a solid team to make this rifle possible. I wanted experts not just from the firearm community but also from the aerospace community who were familiar with a culture that looks beyond the norm. That is why I ended up working with Aaron Cayce of Phoenix Weaponry and his amazing team. They had that aerospace and firearm precision manufacturing experience and barrel development experience. If you work with engineers and manufactures that make instruments that are life saving and build components that are used in space exploration, and who decades of firearms experience you have a team that can outperform anyone in the market. But it was their proprietary trigger that sold me, I have used many triggers in my shooting career and never felt a trigger like the trigger they developed. Together we achieved what others have failed to do. And the beautiful lines of the rifle speaks for itself.

 

After three years of prototyping and hundreds of thousands of dollars in capital, I took it out on my private range where I literally hit dimes several times over with little effort at 100 yards. I also traveled to a nearby desert area and had little difficulty in reaching torso-size targets at 1,400 yards in windy conditions.

 

We package the rifle in a beautiful tactical hard case that includes a matching custom-made paracord sling Foxden. If you want optics, we like to work with Nightforce. When we deliverer the package, it comes pre-zeroed, tested and ready to deploy.

 

To be able to release the rifle this year feels is an honor more than an achievement. I am so proud of our team and my family for having the staying power to make this happen. I feel that each of our individually crafted firearms provides the opportunity to maximize targeting success without compromise. And that’s the goal I wanted to reach.

 

The price point of the rifle is high-end. It comes with a hard case match to suit the rifles. I want to give the readers of the American Shooting Journal  a very special opportunity to own these rifles to celebrate or achievements. Simply send Ralph an email and he will provide you with a very special discount only offered to our readers. To have this opportunity please send a note to Ralph@RTHfirearms.com and he will take care of you.   

 

For additional information about RTH Firearms see rthfirearms.com

The Ins And Outs Of Precision

[su_heading size=”30″ margin=”0″]Exclusive Interview: Frank Green Of  Bartlein Barrels[/su_heading]

INTERVIEW BY STEVE JOSEPH • PHOTOGRAPHS BY FRANK GREEN

If you have ever thought of getting involved in precision shooting, or are already immersed in the Precision Rifle Series competition, Bartlein Barrels is an industry name to know. Frank Green, Tracy Bartlein and Andy Kihn, who all previously worked for Kreiger Barrels, founded Bartlein Barrels and built it into what many are familiar with today – and for good reason.
Green sat down and gave us the ins and outs (pun intended) of their process and concepts of what makes them one of the  best in the industry.

American Shooting Journal Who are the people behind Bartlein Barrels?

Frank Green We are experienced shooters, reloaders and hunters who have been working in the firearms industry collectively for over 30 years.

ASJ What is your title and tell us more about your background?

FG My title depends on which hat I’m wearing at the time. For the most part, I would say sales and technical service manager. I also do research and development for gun manufacturers, and rifle testing.

The process of single-point cut rifling is the most stress-free way to rifle a barrel. The twist is exact.
The process of single point cut rifling is the most stress-free way to rifle a barrel. The twist is exact.

ASJ How did Bartlein get involved in the PRS?

FG Well, GA Precision-built rifles are used in the PRS more than any other builder, and GAP is one of our top customers. Also, other customers like Wade Stuteville at Stuteville Precision, who used to be one of the lead guys at Surgeon Rifles, Surgeon Rifles, Accuracy International, Dave Tooley, Marc Soulie at Spartan Rifles, Mark Gordon at Short Action Customs and several other makers use our barrels, and not just in PRS. You can find our barrels in short- and long-range benchrest, F-Class and Palma matches, high-power rifle matches and many others. A lot of people say that we are the go-to barrel maker. Becoming involved in the PRS just happened naturally.

ASJ Why would someone choose your barrels over another maker in the industry?

FG The uniformity in our barrels and bore finishes are second to none. Our rifling machines are so accurate that we can carry the twist rate to the fourth decimal point (example: 11.3642). The process of single-point cut rifling is the most stress-free way to rifle a barrel. The twist is exact. Other forms of rifling can have variances due to the process they use. Also, the bore and groove dimensions are more uniform.
We pre-lap (a smoothing process) our barrels before rifling and finish-lap the barrel after rifling. There is no need to fire-lap or conduct any other sort of bore polishing to the barrel. Contrary to what others say, a lapped barrel will not wear out earlier versus an unlapped one. In our experience, our barrels will typically last longer than a button barrel. Our desire is to make the best and be the best.

Wade Stuteville of Stuteville Precision competes in the Precision Rifle Series and only uses Bartlein barrels.

ASJ What types of barrels do you offer?

FG We offer chrome-moly steel (CM 4140) and stainless steel (SS 416R).

ASJ Which steel do you think is better?

FG Neither, from what we can see. If we had to pick one, we would lean towards the chrome-moly, possibly because it lasts longer, but how long a barrel lasts is subject to many variables: type of powder being used; how it is being shot and cleaned; types of bullets being shot, etc.

ASJ People often ask what “T-style” rifling is. Can you explain that?

FG We call it transitional rifling, but some refer to it as either gain twist, progressive twist or incremental twist. We can cut virtually any twist into a barrel, subject to tooling, of course, and we can start the twist at 1 in 14 and end up at 1 in 7, and have it uniformly increase from the breech to muzzle. We can also increase it very slowly, say, from 1 in 7.5 at the breech to a 1 in 7 at the muzzle.

“A cut barrel, even with a straight twist, is more uniform and consistent than a button barrel”

ASJ What are the benefits of the transition-style rifling?

FG I’ll quote a great bygone-era barrel maker named Pope:
“The advantages of the gain twist are three: A) A lower twist rate at the breech gives less friction to the bullet, causing it to start easier and quicker, giving the powder less time to burn in front of the chamber, therefore less fouling than in a barrel with a uniform twist at the same muzzle pitch; B) The slight change in rifling angle, in connection with choke bore, effectively shuts off any gas escaping and prevents gas cutting, which is another cause of imperfect delivery; C) It holds a muzzle-loaded bullet in position much better than a uniform twist.
I will add some more to this. First, I feel this applies more to a lead-bullet shooter than a jacketed-bullet shooter, but some of the why and why-nots do overlap. With a transition-style barrel the bullet cannot go to sleep. The rifling is always putting a fresh bite on the bullet as it goes down the bore of the barrel. This is why I always go back to a cut barrel being better than a button barrel.
A cut barrel, even with a straight twist, is more uniform and consistent than a button barrel. With button rifling, the button can hit a hard or soft spot in the steel, and it will slow the button down. The button could speed back up and complete its twist, but either way you end up with a non-uniform twist. This and a twist that keeps getting slower towards the muzzle are accuracy killers and consistently lead to problems such as fliers. Even a slight gain in twist will help accuracy and not hurt a jacketed bullet. What has been conveyed to us – and this goes back to Pope’s first point – is that shooters have noticed  that they can run a slightly heavier powder charge versus a shooter with a straight twist barrel.

“More damage is done from cleaning than physically shooting the gun”

ASJ There are a lot of different schools of thought on cleaners, and what types to use. What do you recommend?

FG We do not recommend things like Iosso bore paste. The paste cleaners get imbedded into the bore, so the next rounds fired through the barrel will damage the bore. There is no way to be sure you have removed it completely from the barrel after cleaning, and some shooters have claimed that their barrel starts fouling right after use. We feel so strongly about this that we will not warranty any barrel cleaned with it. If you want to use a paste-type cleaner, we recommend Remington bore cleaner or JB.

Meet the Bartlein team: (back row) Louie, Ray, Kyle, Jim, John, Todd and Donny; (center row) Joe, Andrew, Kim, Scotty, Ron, Brad, Jeff and Steve; (front row) Justin, Frank Green (founder), Bill, Tracy (founder) and Andy (founder). Other team members include Brian, DJ, Tony, Mike, Tom, Mark, Jesse and Dave, who were hiding around the bundles of steel in the background.
Meet the Bartlein team: (back row) Louie, Ray, Kyle, Jim, John, Todd and Donny; (center row) Joe, Andrew, Kim, Scotty, Ron, Brad, Jeff and Steve; (front row) Justin, Frank Green (founder), Bill, Tracy (founder) and Andy (founder). Other team members include Brian, DJ, Tony, Mike, Tom, Mark, Jesse and Dave, who were hiding around the bundles of steel in the background.

ASJ What about cleaning brushes, do you recommend using them?

FG We only recommend using cleaning patches and solvent. If a shooter insists on using a brush, then we recommend one caliber smaller or an old worn-out one. Wrap a patch around the brush and push it breech to muzzle, unscrew the brush before pulling the cleaning rod back through the bore or over the crown. More damage is done from cleaning than physically shooting the gun.

ASJ Many shooters don’t even clean their rifles, and swear by this. What do you think?

FG I shoot them, I clean them, and the biggest reason is carbon fouling. The carbon fouling will keep building up and can cause pressure issues. Also, as the barrel wears over time, it won’t hold accuracy as long between strings of firing. So you have to clean the barrel. I do not recommend not cleaning at all.

ASJ Frank, thank you for taking the time to talk to us today. Your knowledge and expertise are greatly appreciated.

FG My pleasure. Thank you. ASJ

INTERVIEW: Liberty Arms And The Precision Rifle Series

[su_heading size=”30″ margin=”0″]Gunsmith In ‘Right Sport, Right Time’ for PRS Growth[/su_heading]

Interview by Steve Joseph • Photographs courtesy of Liberty Arms

[su_dropcap style=”light” size=”5″]T[/su_dropcap]he Precision Rifle Series is exploding, and along with it are the shooters and industry professionals who provide only the best in products and services. The PRS has extremely low tolerances for anything outside of perfect.

imagejpeg_1Meet Bob Goettel, owner and founder of Liberty Arms LLC, a full-service gunsmith capable of repairs on all makes and models of firearms. However, their specialty lies in custom-built precision rifles. Take a look at what inspired Goettel to get involved in the PRS, and what keeps his company growing.

American Shooting Journal How did Liberty Arms get its start?

Bob Goettel It started with a family friend who was a custom smith and machinist. The old story of sweeping the floors when I was 9 years old got me into their shop, and they helped me build my first .22 magnum. From that point on it was an addiction. I started building all of my own rifles for match shooting, and that started things in motion. Soon, friends would ask me to build rifles for them, and interest in my work kept building. Eventually the demand pushed me to start the business.

Liberty Arms
Liberty Arms is a strong supporter of the Precision Rifle Series, and is known for creating some of this competition’s best long-range systems. This custom .308 tactical rifle – built on a Stiller action with a Bartlein spiral-fluted barrel, McMillan A3 stock with Liberty Arms cheek rests, custom multicam cerakote finish, Magpul FDE barreled action, US Optics 3.2-17 scope and a Armament Systems arbiter suppressor – just might be your next favorite gun.

ASJ What services do you offer?

BG We offer all of the common gun-related gunsmithing services. However, we focus mainly on custom-rifle builds. We are set up for gunsmithing, cerakote and blueing services,and offer a full line of custom 1911s. Due to the growing popularity of long-range shooting and the growth of the PRS competition, 85 percent of our work has been focused on that portion of the industry. We also do lot of work for the local police department.

LIberty Arms
Bob Goettel’s personal competition rifle – 6.5x47L with  Stiller TAC 30 short action, Bartlein 1-in-8 twist 26-inch barrel, McMillan A3 stock with Liberty Arms cheek rest, PTG bottom metal, US Optics 5.5-25 optic and a SAS TOMB brake suppressor.

 

Liberty Arms
An executive cased 1911, completely hand fit with Caspian slide/frame, case color, and bluing by Doug Turnbull. The ostrich-clad case and African Burlwood grips were designed and created by Liberty Arms. 

ASJ You mentioned having a line of 1911s. What other firearms do you offer?

BG We also have our Trident AR-15 and -10, as well as bolt rifles, which are built using our lines and customer specs. The great thing for shooters today is the abundance of parts and accessories that are available. Just about anything is possible.

 

ASJ How did you get involved with the PRS?

BG The PRS and long-range shooting in general has exploded in the past few years. From that explosion most shooters have found me. Just being into the right sport at the right time has helped set things in motion, and the PRS is a great event that keeps the rifle population alive. It’s great to be a small part of it.

 

ASJ Thank you for talking to us, Bob.

BG Thank you ASJ

Liberty Arms
This Remington 700 chambered in .300 H&H Magnum with an engraved action, Douglas barrel, Libery Arms custom three-panel checked bolt knob, Bastogne walnut stock, Obendorf bottom metal and three-position safety with Swarovski optics is almost too sweet to shoot.
Liberty Arms
This .308 tactical/marksman rifle features a Remington 700 action, Kreiger fluted barrel, AICS AX chassis, S&B optics with a laser rangefinder and a Surefire suppressor.

Who’s Who For Surgeon Rifles 2016

[su_heading size=”26” margin=”0″]Surgeon Rifles Announces New Pro Shooters For 2016 [/su_heading]

 

(Phoenix, AZ – Oct 26, 2015) As the 2016 Precision Rifle Series (PRS) season approaches, Team Surgeon took early notice by signing some of the best available shooters to their Pro Team. Just recently, Surgeon Rifles announced team sponsorships for 3 new members.

Relatively new to the circuit, 2015 PRS Champion shooter David Preston, from Pennsylvania, has competed in the PRS for only two seasons but has been in contention for the top trophy at nearly every match he has entered. David’s passion for accuracy and long range precision shooting led him to compete, and there has been no stopping him since. David has honed his talents as a precision shooter and is capable of cleaning a stage with amazing efficiency and accuracy.  To follow David on the competition field follow him here https://www.facebook.com/DavidPrestonPRS.

Bannon-Elridge
Bannon Elridge

Based out of Texas, Matthew Brousseau, who finished 7th overall at the PRS Season Championship match, is also a welcome addition of new fire to Team Surgeon. A former Sergeant in the USMC and now overseas contractor, Borusseau has found a new passion in rifles and loves the competitive environment. Brosseau states, “Near the end of 2013 I started hearing about this Precision Rifle Series and it piqued my interest. In the spring of 2014 I purchased my first precision rifle and headed to a match to see what it was all about. I didn’t finish very well but I was instantly hooked and was determined to learn my way to the top. 2015 has been a great 2nd year for me.

Also residing in Texas, Bannon Eldridge, makes up the 3rd new member and sleeper pick for Team Surgeon. Eldridge has been competing since 2009, but on a limited basis. In 2014 he qualified for the PRS Championship with two top 15% performances, and has been busy off of the range as well. He has been staying sharp by winning a few Texas club matches against a strong field of PRS shooters. Rich Emmons from Team Surgeon says, “Bannon has put it all together and is shooting better than ever. He will definitely make a big splash for Team Surgeon in 2016.”

Returning for 2016, Iowa resident Jim See, led last year’s Team Surgeon performance with two PRS wins and 6 other top 15% place finishes. See is a dominant competitor who finished 6th overall last season in the Series and is pressing hard to take the Golden Bullet Award next season. Texas based shooters Rich Emmons and Kevin Elpers, also returning for another season with Team Surgeon, look to improve over last year’s season with a new spark from training with new teammates. Over the years, both shooters have proven they can compete with excellence and are excited to rise to the challenge.

Jim-See-min
Jim See

In addition to new members, Team Surgeon Rifles will also be introducing a new partner this season, its sister company NEXUS Ammunition. Nexus is emerging as a top contender in the custom match ammunition scene, and the team has already worked to develop a 6.5×47 load that is sure to be seen in the winner’s circle. Nexus aims to deliver match grade factory ammunition with equivalent quality and precision of hand loading without the hassle. Current ammunition available from Nexus includes .223 Rem, .308 Win, .260 Rem, and .338 Lapua. Visit nexusammo.com for more information.

Along with Nexus ammo, Team Surgeon uses and relies on Hawk Hill Barrels, Vortex Optics, and Short Action Precision gear.

KevinElpers-RichEmmons-min
(LEFT) Kevin Elpers and (RIGHT) Rich Emmons

About Surgeon Rifles: Surgeon Rifles is a 10-year-old manufacturer of high-end precision bolt-action rifles, actions, and other accessories. Shooters who are highly ranked in industry competitive contests consistently utilize surgeon rifles and actions to be successful in such events. An indication of the quality and accuracy of the Surgeon rifle is demonstrated by the results of the Precision Rifle Series.

In 2011, Strategic Armory Corps acquired Surgeon Rifles. The Phoenix based parent company also owns Armalite, AWC Suppressors, McMillan Firearms, and NEXUS Ammo. All of the manufacturing of Surgeon Rifles parts still takes place in Prague, OK, with many of the original employees and equipment. SAC continues to work to ensure that the Surgeon Rifles legacy of precision, quality, and durability grows even stronger. www.surgeonrifles.com

About Nexus Ammo: Nexus Ammunition provides discerning shooters high impact solutions through unparalleled, patented automation processes. The “Nexus Method” meticulously produces ammunition to exacting tolerances equal to the attention of hand loading. Our unique machinery and automation allows us to build ammunition to exact specifications, starting with the raw materials. This method is proven to provide a consistency in weight in every cartridge, delivering the quality and ballistic performance you can rely upon.

You can depend on Nexus Ammo to deliver a full ballistic spectrum of ammunition performance for your tactical, defense, or hunting needs. When you require consistency, accuracy, and repeatability… Nexus is your solution.

About Strategic Armory Corps: Strategic Armory Corps was formed with the goal of acquiring and combining market-leading companies within the firearms industry. Each company that is brought into the SAC family fulfills a consumer need with their brand of niche products. To date, four highly respected manufacturing companies have been acquired with a fifth in the start-up phase. These companies strategically fit together to form a strong base of products and services that are designed to meet the expectations of military, law enforcement, commercial groups, and individual users around the world.

Matthew-Brousseau-min
Matthew Brousseau

The Evolution of the Sniper Rifle

This is a quick down and dirty of the main sniper rifles that was significant from past to present and had made huge contribution in the U.S. war campaigns. We will update with more current modern rifles in the future.

Evolution of the Sniper Rifle

Embed this Evolution Sniper Rifle Infograph onto your site by copying and pasting the codes below.

Extreme Long Range Pellet Rifle

125ydshotThese long-range air rifle shots will make you think more highly of pellet guns. For many of us, our first experiences with shooting included BB guns and pellet guns. These air pellet rifles are like nothing we’ve used before!

You can score some amazing quick kill shots at incredible distances with an Edgun Matador .22 PCP Air Rifle and a range finder. The video features some awesome impacts on invasive species, including pigeons, English sparrows, and European starlings. It proves air rifles have come a long way in the past decade.
Grab one of these rifles and say goodbye to small pests for good!

by Eric Nestor

.338 Lapua Ringing the Bell From More Than a Mile Out

338lapua
The .338 Lapua has become a renowned round for those aiming to stretch marksmanship to its limits. It has certainly done that since its development in 1980s, becoming a favorite of police and military snipers worldwide.

In fact, the .338 Lapua was the instrument used in the longest confirmed sniper kill to date. British Corporal of Horse Craig Harrison in 2009 came up with 2,707-yard kill shot in Afghanistan with his .338 Lapua. It’s a shot that is hard to imagine – until you watch the video.

The video poster gives the best setup of what can only be considered an incredible piece of shooting:

A few days ago I took out the .338 Lapua [Savage Arms 110 BA] and attempted the 2500 yard shot. So I placed the target at 2530 yards or 1.43 miles away, at that distance the bullet flight time is almost 4.5 seconds! …

I went out early in the morning to beat the mirage, luckly there was very little wind around 3-4 mph coming from the left, I dialed 2.6 mils Left. I had to dialed the maximum elevation my scope (Nightforce NXS 5.5-22×56 MIL/MIL) had at 27.4 mils then held over 2.5 mils on the reticle to get me to 29.9 mils.

Given the price of the rifle’s ammunition – around $5 per round – this guy certainly made every shot count. Be sure to watch the entire video, at the end the shooter shows off the recovered slugs and boy does the rifle do a job on them.

by Elwood Shelton