Hog Hunting with a .50 Cal

Ever wondered what it would be like to go hog hunting with a Barrett .50-caliber rifle? This guy in Texas actually did.
If you thought hog hunting with elephant guns was impressive, check out these guys in Texas (Youtube dbtexhunts1) who decided to bring this up a notch and go hog hunting with a Barrett .50 cal rifle.

In a battle between a 100-150 pound hog and a .50 cal bullet with about 14,000 foot pounds of energy, the hog is going down every time.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NX8_4b3ldhg
I don’t think debating if this is ethical hunting or not.
Ask any ranchers or farmers that have these feral hogs running wild and tearing up their plantations. They’ll tell you this is one of the option to control that.

Unfortunately, shooting a hog with a Barrett .50 cal probably destroy a lot of meat, which is one of the tasty side benefits to shooting a hog this size.
Guess you can use a less caliber rifle, if you’re concern of less meat.
However, one thing is certain: it sure looks like loads of fun!

Brian Kemp’s Cringy Gun Related Political Ad

This guy is running for Georgia state governor:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ABRz_epvic&w=560&h=315]

The only thing I find more cringy than politics and the main people involved, are low effort but try hard promo videos… worse yet when they are gun related.

What are the chances Brian has at least one gun with a bible inscription on it, a punisher skull, or MoLoN LaBe?

I didn’t scroll the YouTube comments, but I wouldn’t be surprised if piehitters (who don’t even live in Georgia) were like “Brain, I’m GoNa VoTe 4 You.  IMpoRTnt Queshtun Tho diD u ShOoT yUr YETI cOoLerz Yet?”

The “I have guns, so treat my daughter well” joke is so played out.  I don’t know when it was first uttered, but I’m sure it was shortly after the invention of black powder.  I think it’s safe to say the joke has run its course.

Thoughts?

Real Life Is 360 Degrees BrAh You Better Train Like You Fight

Rich Graham at it again.  Beard, bullets, and two of his buddies:

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T1fit3vzKaE&w=560&h=315]

This “drill” looks about as useful as it is interesting.  Nothing much really happens in the video, but since the internet exists and is used by many as a place to stroke their ego we see Rich Graham convinced two of his buddies to stand ahead of where he’s shooting so he shoots past them at the “threat”.   Some of us gasp at how unnecessary having two live human being stand in front of the line of fire for something like this is… others will comment or say to themselves “Hell yea brother”, because somehow this slight risk speaks to them… Rich Graham doesn’t conform  This is all done in a very slow and controlled manner thankfully, but that also makes it less interesting.

I miss Tactical Jostle Rich Graham.

Thoughts?

Stop Sticks Gone Wrong

FUNNY COP STORIES

Stop Sticks Gone Wrong

[su_heading]Story by retired St. Lucie County Detective Scott Young[/su_heading]

[su_dropcap style=”light” size=”5″]W[/su_dropcap]orking as a deputy sheriff in south Florida during the late 1990s, my agency had just been issued stop-sticks. These sticks were about 3 feet long and had large spikes protruding all the way around. They were meant to be used as a stop-gap measure when a suspect was fleeing in a vehicle.
If an officer could get into position, the sticks were to be thrown in front of the tires as the car passed by. The weight of the car would bear down on the spikes, deflating the tires and ideally ending the chase safely. If I said everyone was eager to deploy them, that would be an understatement.

stinger3
Stinger stop sticks are similar to large hypodermic needles (hollow on the inside) which allows the tire to quickly deflate.

While working a series of burglaries in the most southern portion of our county, I heard dispatch state over the radio that the special investigations unit (SIU) was in pursuit of suspects who had fled during a drug raid. Although I was some distance away, there was a possibility the suspects would flee in my direction, so I kept my ears open. A short time later, dispatch advised that SIU was still in pursuit and heading my way. I responded to let them know my location and that I had stop-sticks. As the information unfolded over the radio and I listened intently, my excitement increased when the suspects chose an escape route with only one possible avenue: right past my location. I repositioned my marked patrol car to a more hidden location and stood near the roadside and waited.

I watched other traffic pass my location and soon heard the loud siren of the pursuing patrol car and the roar of the suspect’s engine as they neared. I saw a dark van careening around the corner with the marked patrol car right on its tail. I waited for the vehicle to get close, then threw the stop-sticks just before they passed. The sticks hit their mark, and not only the front tires, but the back as well. Excited, I ran to my patrol car, got in and advised dispatch that I hit the suspect’s vehicle. I activated my lights and siren and headed south. As the road wound to the right I saw the pursuing patrol car parked behind the suspect’s van, which was tilted rigidly to the right and on the side of the road. That is when I observed several individuals dressed in black with the letters DEA on their backs. “OMG!!” I had stop-sticked the DEA van.

Stop sticksDispatch had communicated the description of the suspect’s vehicle on the SIU channel, but not my main channel. I stopped my patrol car about 100 feet way and turned off my lights and siren. To say they were upset would, again, be an understatement. They all were yelling something and with arms flailing wildly while motioning for me to come closer. I shook my head left and right to say no way! At that moment my sergeant’s voice came through over the radio and asked, “Well, did you get ’em?” Oh, I got them. My only reply was, “Sarge, I think you need to get down here right away.”

Several years later, as a task force officer assigned to the DEA, the driver of the van that day was assigned as my training officer. He trusted me with his life, but not the stop-sticks. ASJ