February 17th, 2017 by jhines

[su_heading size=”30″]The Moves are Un-Detectable[/su_heading]

There are many martial arts systems out there that teaches empty hand knife defense skills. Most of the scenario is your basic knife at the stomach, knife at the small of your back or thrusting at the stomach.

But what’s really different about this next one is what if the attacker has the knife at the neck area with the blade touching the skin. And, to make it further interesting for this training/demonstration is to have the attacker cut your neck if he senses that the defender tries to defend with a technique of some sort.

Fred Mastro is a self defense instructor from Germany, he has some great solutions for this type of knife defense. His approach is practical in sense of non economy of motion. In this case its actually about economy of techniques. For example, most self defense system would teach you to quickly go for the hand holding the knife and do a wrist lock to disarm them. So imagine in your mind as soon as the defender intitiate his movement to grab the adversary knife hand, more than likely the defender has been cut and they’re now wrestling over the blade.

Mastro shows you simple strikes at the ribs and the back of the neck to throw your adversary off, these are effective stuns that creates an involuntary reaction from the adversary to move away from the defender. Like when the doctor hits test your reflex by tapping your knees or funny bone. The beauty behind these strikes is that the attacker don’t see it coming.
Body Targets

  • Ribs
  • Back of Neck
  • Side of Thigh (Sciatic Nerve)
  • Inside of Knee

[su_heading size=”30″]Video Transcription[/su_heading]

[Fred Mastro] Ok, if you have a knife… Ok, this position. Not just to work here, because you can cut. At the same time, we need this, to have this little distance to work. Ok. After this, I love this. [Disarm]

[Director] One more time. And explain to us why he can’t stop it. May I? May I try?

[Fred] Yeah.

[Director] So, if you move, I–

[Fred] Yeah. So if I move, you cut, huh?

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred attacks]

[Director] Cut! I cut him!

[Fred] Ok. If I move, you cut.

[Fred attacks]

[Director] Cut!

[Fred] Elbow, cut.

[Director] I cut him.

[Fred] I go back, gun? Cut.

[Director] Easy.

[Fred] Ok. (to Cameraman) Go here. (To Director) I need to make a little distance, and in the same time…

[Fred Punches]

[Director] OH! [pained noises]

[Fred] Just to have a distance.

[Director] One more.

[Fred] Ok.

[Director] I’m gonna cut him.

[Fred] Yeah. Please. Ok. [Punches]

[Director gives pained noises]

[Director] (groaning) I cut him. I think I cut him.

[Fred] Ok. You know why?

[Director] Why?

[Fred] Because first time, you are like this. And second time, you are like this. [Laughter] Yeah. If you are close, yeah, get in close. Not close, this one.

[Director, grunting] Yeah.

[Fred] Very close, it’s incredible, but you have some nerve with your hands. [Fred whacks the Director, who grunts]

[Stick drops as Doug walks off in pain]

[Fred] Can you cut, Doug?

[Doug] Cut me? Ok.

[Director] No.

[Fred] You don’t see what’s happened?

[Director] No.

[Doug] You don’t see it, exactly. You don’t see it. You just– that’s the key.

[Fred] It’s mean, but it’s not these guys behind you.

[Director] You lose all intention. You lose ANY intention. You lose EVERYTHING.

[Fred] You need– for this one, is better, to feel just the end, some very close contact. Is possible [Uninteligable] With a short knife. No problem. But look the hand– [Fred attacks director] Distance. Ok?

[Director] Yeah, I pulled–

[Fred] You need this distance. The same. Here? Ok? The same move. You can see this. [Fred knees Director, Director falls, cursing quietly.] Ah, please sir. Please, please. [mock-cuts Director’s hand, laughs, helps him back up.] This one is good for camera.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] Because, is not large move. Is very close, slow motion, I don’t touch you. No, use your hand, use your hand. This. Where’s this, my body is not this, but this. And I need the distance with the knife. Slow motion.

[Director] Show me the wrong way. If you punch me the wrong way I go this way.

[Fred] Normal. If I hit you normally.

[Director] Yeah, yeah.

[Fred] Elbow is the same. The elbow is the same, if I block and I come in with the elbow, is the same.

[Director] *Bow*, *bow*, right through!

[Fred] Never punch in this situation. I saw some style of this, they come and punch– ok, but!

[Director] I’m cutting him!

[Fred] You know why? You don’t know the size of the blade. If the blade is this size, is the blade this size? Imagine a big blade, I don’t see, because this is my angle.

[Director] Yeah, oh, here. The blade’s here.

[Fred] I punch you–

[Director] *SCHTCHT* [laughter]

[Fred] Big distance with the blade. You cut the VIP. Sure. The same, here. I love -this- reaction. To have this reaction, you need to work down. Inside the knee [Fred kicks Director, Director grunts and reacts] and you have this reaction.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] Can feel the– You feel the knee.

[Director] But!

[Fred] It’s twenty per-cent. Twenty percent. Twenty percent. Sometimes, -the same- ok. I can use, I like this punch. [Fred punches Director, who grunts and doubles over again] Ok.

[Director] Phone! [laughter]

[Fred] No, you can’t say, no problem. But I break the- [laughter] But the best one is this, and this.

[Director] Yeah.

[Fred] And no problem, I don’t need to catch this, look. Very slow, ten percent, look, this one and this one. Ten percent. See?

[Director] It’s moving.

[Fred] Take a knife, real knife. Real knife. This is muscle. I’m sure. Take the knife. Take! Take the knife, brother. Take the knife.

[Director] [Grunts in pain, drops knife, curses]

[Fred] Twenty-five percent. Just twenty-five percent.

[Cameraman] How ‘ya doin’ there, big guy?

[Director] I was not– ok that wasn’t rehearsed, I was not comfortable with having the real knife out. Uh, not something that we would normally do or normally show, but I guess in this instance, we gotta do it man. Because the videos sometimes don’t do this shit justice, and there’s a lot of– just, just, go man. Go to a course. I dare you. I will personally give you double your money back if you ever go to like a Mastro seminar and you’re like ‘yeah this is Bullshit’. Personally. I’ll put my life on it, man. Forreal. So, uh, the usual stuff: Like, subscribe, comment, come to a class and experience it for yourself. That’s all I gotta say. Now I gotta go… fuckin’…FUCK.

Posted in Training Tagged with: , , ,

January 28th, 2017 by jhines

What happens when you bring a fight to a gun store?

When two men entered the Dixie Gun and Pawn at 11 am to rob the place, it’s hard to tell what they were thinking. Were they aiming for a store next door? Did they really think they had a foolproof plan? Were they just bored and looking to spice up their lives?

They tried to wave guns, and one man even tried to pull a second handgun, but they neglected the thought that maybe, just maybe, the store clerk at the Dixie GUN and pawn might also be carrying a gun.

The man tried to pull a second gun was promptly shot dead by the worker behind the counter, while the other fled and has not been identified yet.

The shooting was excellent, and in this writer’s opinion, justified; But of course, that doesn’t excuse the callous disregard for life that has followed suit.

The comments of the video have ranged from simply insensitive (suggestions that the dead man’s body be photographed and turned into a cardboard standee to ward off other intruders) to outright racist (comments with phrases like “Then again, black guys aren’t known for being smart”).

While the man behind the counter should be praised for his calm under pressure and survival instinct, let’s not forget that even poor life choices don’t stop a person from being human. In this case, this was a life-or-death situation and life-or-death measures were taken, but it is still not acceptable to treat a death as callous humor, and it is never acceptable to make racist comments. This writer is apalled. In 2017, we should all be better than this.

Comments

@Jack_Mehoffer�before the shot, the criminal look at his fellow. Bad decision for him.

@raven11356�You’d think two black guys would avoid tempting fate by not robbing a gun shop named after the Confederate South. Then again, black guys aren’t known for being smart.

@Jack Tors�It’s not a “robbery suspect” that died on the floor – it’s an armed robber.
Lucky they have a camera in the shop…

@ValleyBlacksmith�Well stated. I wouldn’t be surprised if the newsy types used the word ‘allegedly’ somewhere in there description of the event. FFS it’s stone cold proven on video and they’ll give benefit of the doubt. I’m all for ‘innocent until proven guilty’, but I think this one was settled.

@stoma_rider�Less than 2 seconds and that gun store clerk assesed, drew and center massed that clown. That was homey’s last robbery.

@jeffbaustin�He doesn’t move an inch after gravity is finished. Dead as a door nail.

@PHILBAWDY�Ya a .45 packs one hell of a punch. Old man even held steady on the recoil. This is how it should be. Government wants to take guns away from these people so they can get robbed all the time and possibly killed. The government can shove it up their ass

You know he’s been waiting for years for that to happen.
Who robs a gun/pawn shop? That’s the worst target to choose.

by Sam Morstan

Sources: LiveLeak

Posted in Self Defense Tagged with:

December 31st, 2016 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]The Ruger 3-inch LCRx remains an excellent choice for a lightweight trail gun or for home defense.[/su_heading]

STORY AND PHOTOS BY ROB REED

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]R[/su_dropcap]ecently, the Ruger LCRx with a 3-inch barrel transformed the popular lightweight revolver design from a snub-nose carry gun into a handy general-purpose revolver.

The Ruger LCRx in .38 Special.

The Ruger LCRx in .38 Special.

The innovative LCR design has been a hit with shooters since the original Ruger LCR .38 Special +P was released in 2009. That design was optimized for concealed carry with a five-round cylinder, 1.875-inch barrel and hammerless, double-action-only trigger. Since that time Ruger (ruger.com) has expanded the line by chambering the gun in new calibers and adding new features. The LCRx model added single-action capability by introducing an exposed hammer to the available options but retained the short barrel length.

The author tested the LCRx with .38 Special loads from Hornady.

The author tested the LCRx with .38 Special loads from Hornady.

In late 2014 Ruger released the LCRx with a 3-inch barrel. This variant is again chambered in .38 Special +P with an exposed hammer that allows both double-action and single-action activation. The 3-inch tube has a full-length rib and fulllength underlug. The black rear sight is adjustable for both elevation and windage. The serrated front sight features a white square to aid in sight acquisition. The sight is pinned to the barrel and can be easily removed and replaced with one of the other front sight options available from Ruger. The package is completed with the installation of a full-size Hogue Tamer grip in place of the shorter grips on the previous models.

The rest of the gun follows the general LCR pattern: The two main structural components are the aerospace-grade aluminum frame mated to a polymer fire control housing. The lock work includes a patented friction-reducing cam that eliminates stacking and reduces the perceived trigger weight. The stainless-steel cylinder is heavily fluted for weight savings with a durable black Ionbond Diamondblack finish. The push-button cylinder release is in the normal Ruger location on the left side of the frame behind the cylinder.

1701-ruger-lcr-03THE BARREL UTILIZES a stainless-steel liner and aluminum shroud with a polished muzzle. The ejector rod is the same length as on the 2-inch barreled models. The one-piece grip fits onto a shorter grip peg molded as part of the fire control housing. The grip can be removed and replaced by unscrewing a single screw in the butt.

The first thing I noticed about my review model was the size. While the LCR heritage is evident, this is no pocket gun. The extra inch of barrel, full-length rib, and larger sized Hogue grip add enough to the physical envelope to push it into the small side of the medium-frame revolver category.

The 3-inch barrel increased the overall length to 7.5 inches, while the full-length rib and larger Hogue grip make it taller at 5.8 inches. The LCRx 3-inch weighs 15.7 ounces. For comparison, the standard 2-inch-barreled .38 Special LCR is 6.5 inches long, 4.5 inches high, and weighs 13.5 ounces.

I had my gunsmith measure the trigger pull with a Lyman digital gauge when I picked up the revolver. This revealed a pull weight of 11.5 pounds for double-action and 7.0 pounds for single-action.

I tested the gun with a variety of .38 Special loads provided by Hornady Ammunition. This included their Critical Defense Lite 90-grain FTX load, their Critical Defense 110-grain FTX standard and +P loads, their 125-grain XTP load, and their 158-grain XTP load.

I warmed up by shooting a few rounds at a plate rack at 15 yards to give me a general feel for the double-action and single-action trigger pulls. I then fired for groups at 25 yards while seated at a table with my hands resting on the LCR’s zipper bag for padding. All firing here was single-action.

The best group, measured from the furthest distances of the holes, was almost exactly 2½ inches.

Interestingly, it was almost exactly the same when measured from the top- to bottom-most holes as when measured from the furthest left to the furthest right. This was the standard-pressure 158-grain FTX load.

The second best group was from the Critical Defense 110-grain standard-pressure load that printed at just over 3 inches, from furthest edge to furthest edge, with pronounced left-to-right stringing.

1701-ruger-lcr-04

The revolver is a great choice for shooters of smaller stature.

Unfortunately, the deliberate single-action, slow-fire shooting revealed a mechanical problem that I hadn’t noticed during the more casual firing at the plate rack. The hammer was noticeably more difficult to cock on one of the chambers than the others. I later consulted with a gunsmith friend who said the likely cause was due to out-of-spec machining on the lobe of the star corresponding to that chamber. (I later cleaned the revolver and the problem was still there during dry fire with the clean gun.) The one bad hammer pull made the precision testing more difficult. I only got the best two groups later in the test after I identified and compensated for the issue. At first the heavier and grittier pull on that chamber both threw off my concentration and also caused me to break my grip. This also made it impossible to determine if any particular load was more accurate in the gun. A typical “bad” group was 5 inches or so, often with one flyer that messed up an otherwise good group.

1701-ruger-lcr-05

The author achieved good results shooting at 25 yards while seated.

IN EXCHANGE FOR THE LARGER size and weight over the flagship LCR, you get a revolver that is easier and more fun to shoot. The grip is large and comfortable, the hammer is easily accessible for single-action cocking, and the longer sight radius and more visible sights help practical accuracy. The extra weight over the standard .38 Special version helps make the gun more pleasant to shoot as well. While the +P rounds had some noticeable sting, they weren’t bad, and the polymer trigger housing and generous grip soaked up the recoil of the standard-pressure rounds nicely.

The only disappointment in the design was that the gun retained the short 2-inch ejector rod of the parent models. While it’s understandable that Ruger wouldn’t want to spend the money on a dedicated 3-inch ejector rod for this model, having that full ejector rod stroke would have been a nice touch. Note that I didn’t have any problems with the shorter ejection stroke; I just prefer the longer ejector rod when possible.

The Ruger LCRx 3-inch would make an excellent choice for a lightweight trail gun, as a concealed carry gun in a belt holster, or as a home defense gun. As with most revolvers, the limited ammo capacity is an issue, but if you want a lightweight revolver that shots like a medium-frame gun, this is one to get. ASJ

Posted in Handguns Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

October 19th, 2016 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]Tac Star’s Slimline Shotshell Carrier increases the readiness factor of every smoothbore.[/su_heading]

STORY AND PHOTOS BY DAVE WORKMAN

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]R[/su_dropcap]ecent tragic events have forced a growing number of armed citizens to the realization that while it is still a remote possibility, the potential for finding one’s self in the middle of a terrorist action or a riot has gone up, as has the need for a defensive weapon.

After San Bernardino and Orlando, our comfort zones have shrunk, and for the first time many of us can remember, some in law enforcement have changed their tune from “call 911 and wait” to “run, hide or fight.”

The author’s Mossberg 50 pump shotgun and Tac Star’s handy Side Saddle Slimline accessory prior to easy assembly.

The author’s Mossberg 50 pump shotgun and Tac Star’s handy Side Saddle Slimline accessory prior to easy assembly.

Unfortunately, San Bernardino taught us that we may not be able to run fast enough, and Orlando showed us that hiding and waiting to be saved might not be a survivable option. That leaves the third alternative.

According to a recent report by the Crime Prevention Research Center, the notion of carrying a handgun for personal protection has inspired somewhere north of 14 million citizens to arm up, and the number is rising steadily.

To attach the shell holder, start by using the appropriate punch to tap out the rear retaining pin through the trigger assembly, being careful not to let the trigger move.

To attach the shell holder, start by using the appropriate punch to tap out the rear retaining pin through the trigger assembly, being careful not to let the trigger move.

I PREFER A DEFENSIVE HANDGUN because it can always be with me. But it’s just one tool in the box. If it should ever come to pass that something major happens, I’ll use that sidearm to get me to something with a little more horsepower: my Mossberg 500 pump shotgun.

Many of us have good pump guns in the closet for bird hunting or maybe home defense. Mine was purchased some 25 years ago, as a package deal. It has a 20-inch upland bird barrel with a vent rib, and a second 18-inch barrel with an open choke. I ordered it with a “Speed Feed” synthetic stock designed to hold four extra shells, two on each side, in spring-loaded slots. With the plug out, that gave me five shells in the tubular magazine and one in the chamber, plus four spares.

Recently I added something new, thanks to Tac Star’s latest entry in the Side Saddle lineup, the “Slimline” version. Made from a tough rubber compound with a metal backing plate, this worthwhile add-on allows the user to have six extra shells at hand on the left side of the receiver in the event one has to grab and run. What previously gave me 10 rounds now offers as many as 16 shots, provided I start off fully loaded.

Unscrew the small slide screw inside the receiver, through the open ejection port.

Unscrew the small slide screw inside the receiver, through the open ejection port.

INSTALLING THIS ACCESSORY is a snap. First, make sure your shotgun is completely unloaded. Then, using the proper diameter punch, push out the pin on the lower rear of the receiver that holds the trigger assembly in place, being careful to keep the trigger housing where it belongs.

These shell slots are made of a tough rubber compound.

These shell slots are made of a tough rubber compound.

Tac Star provides a two-piece screw that inserts from both ends. One end features a beveled head that fits into the corresponding slot on the Side Saddle Slimline. Two small hex wrenches are also included to tighten this screw from both sides simultaneously.

However, don’t tighten the first screw all the way. Leave enough slack for the mount to rotate so that it can be fastened up front. Remove the interior slide screw with a screwdriver inserted in the open ejection port. Insert the replacement screw that goes through a corresponding hole up front on the Side Saddle and tighten it down. Then finish tightening the rear screw.

It’s also a good idea to use a drop of blue Loctite to keep both screws in place.

Workman recently dressed up his Mossberg 50 for defensive duty with the Side Saddle shotshell carrier. A pistoleer always has a backup plan.

Workman recently dressed up his Mossberg 50 for defensive duty with the Side Saddle shotshell carrier. A pistoleer always has a backup plan.

You can pray to all the Gods in the heavens to keep you safe and out of harm’s way, or you can follow the age-old advice of the Boy Scouts and “always be prepared.” Personally, I’d rather prepare than simply pray, except to pray that all of my preparations never have to be used. ASJ


Posted in Gear Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

October 14th, 2016 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]Tactical Walls thinks ‘outside the big, steel box’ with its innovative gun safe designs.[/su_heading]

STORY BY CRAIG HODGKINS • PHOTOS BY TACTICAL WALLS 

This recessed In-Wall Home-Defense Mirror from Tactical Walls comes in black (shown), early American, Dutch walnut, cherry, white and “raw.”

This recessed In-Wall Home-Defense Mirror from Tactical Walls comes in black (shown), early American, Dutch walnut, cherry, white and “raw.”

[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]F[/su_dropcap]or decades, gun owners were forced to make difficult choices or to compromise when it came to firearms storage. On one hand, owners needed firearms to be stored securely to protect them from theft and to ensure the safety of younger family members. At the same time, protecting those same loved ones often required that the firearms be quickly and easily available for access in case of an intruder or other emergency.

There have been excellent gun safes on the market for decades, and many do their intended job very well. But until recently, gun safes were all about security and safety, not easy access.

That all began to change a few years ago, when technological advancements such as radio frequency identification (RFID) enabled companies to think outside the big, steel box and develop products that could provide both security and access. One of these, Tactical Walls, has done an excellent job creating firearms storage products that “hide in plain sight.”

The mirror opens with one swipe of an RFID key card.

The mirror opens with one swipe of an RFID key card.

One of the things I like about these products is that every security item they produce is disguised as a functional piece of furniture or home décor. And once you’ve seen their product line in person, you’ll never be able to look at a bedroom mirror, decorative shelf or wall clock the same way again.

Several recent releases in the Tactical Walls line offer RFID locking mechanisms as an optional alternative to the existing magnetic lock. According to company literature, opening up a hidden compartment is as easy as swiping the preset RFID card in front of the locking mechanism. Each RFID unit comes standard with two key cards and one programming card used to match the key to the proper unit, and owners can order additional RFID cards if needed. If desired, a single card can also be set to open multiple units, granting access to each firearm staged throughout the home.

Tactical Walls shelves are designed for use with standard 2x4 stud framing, and hang like any regular wall shelf.

Tactical Walls shelves are designed for use with standard 2×4 stud framing, and hang like any regular wall shelf.

Each shelf comes preassembled, and is supplied with a set of two bookend-style shelf brackets for added support, one foam insert, plus anchors and fasteners.

Each shelf comes preassembled, and is supplied with a set of two bookend-style shelf brackets for added support, one foam insert, plus anchors and fasteners.

The new RFID-locking models also offer a programmable “tattletale” function that (when activated) will begin beeping when the unit has been left open for a designated period of time. This helps firearms owners keep guns from unwanted users by reminding them when the compartment is left open.

A foam insert securely holds everything in place in this undershelf design, and optional LED lights help illuminate your hidden cache.

A foam insert securely holds everything in place in this undershelf design, and optional LED lights help illuminate your hidden cache.

Finally, in addition to being excellent firearm storage devices, Tactical Walls products stand out because they are built to last. For example, their new rifle-length shelves are handcrafted in the U.S. using real hardwood, and are available in six different finishes.

A close-up view of the sturdy RFID locking mechanism.

A close-up view of the sturdy RFID locking mechanism.

MSRPs for Tactical Walls products are based on several factors, including lock type, shelf length and choice of finish, so contact the company or a dealer near you for more information.

Tactical Walls is based in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley, and is a family-owned and -operated business. To learn more, visit tacticalwalls.com. ASJ


Posted in Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

July 8th, 2016 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]Facility Teaches Full-spectrum Defensive, Protective Training [/su_heading]

[su_dropcap style=”light” size=”5″]W[/su_dropcap]hen training for self defense, it is not uncommon to find yourself in a karate or jujitsu class, or at a gun range shooting paper targets. If you are lucky at the range, you will have reactionary or moving targets to make your supposed threat a bit more realistic. The value of training cannot be understated; however, if you are looking to train at truly top levels, where the full theater of the environment, critical thinking, weapons and hand-to-hand combat comes together – just like they will in a real emergency – you might just want to shake hands with Brian Winchester of Reality Based Tactical Training  in Tennessee.

Ground control is among the many self-defense disciplines that Reality Based Tactical Training offers at their 80,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility near Knoxville, in eastern Tennessee.

Ground control is among the many self-defense disciplines that Reality Based Tactical Training offers at their 80,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art facility near Knoxville, in eastern Tennessee.

Winchester is practically a living legend, although his humble demeanor would never give that away. In short, not only is he a passionate instructor who covers everything from hand-to-hand martial arts to firearms and edged-weapons handling, subjects such as critical management, threat assessment and ground control are among the plethora of other subjects he and his team cover.

Among many of Winchester’s talents and achievements, he was inducted into the World Martial Arts Hall of Fame for outstanding contributions to the martial arts – now, how is that for an impressive background? – but he is the first to say that Reality Based Training wouldn’t be as diverse and impressive without the team of instructors who are equally as passionate about self-defense and bring a wealth of knowledge from all facets of the industry.

Winchester sat down with American Shooting Journal and gave us some insight into what it takes to be the best in the industry, and why defense professionals from as far away as Europe and Israel reach out to him.

Many of the instructors at RBTT are highly accomplished martial arts experts who are capable of applying and teaching techniques anyone can use.

Many of the instructors at RBTT are highly accomplished martial arts experts who are capable of applying and teaching techniques anyone can use.

American Shooting Journal Hello, Brian, and thank you so much for your time. Can you tell us a little bit about Reality Based Training and what you offer?

Brian Winchester We are a one-stop shop. This means that if you want to learn how to use a firearm, we can do that. If you want to learn hand-to-hand defensive tactics and martial arts, we can do that. We also cover threat assessment and intervention, medical and crisis management. What I feel sets us apart is that we can conduct the totality of training by pulling together mental and physical threats. We can do it all right here.

ASJ Why do you feel it is important to offer so many options?

BW True self-preservation has much more to do with mental conditioning than what the general population understands. The physical aspect of training is great, but because reaction is slower than action, without training the mind to have a battle mindset, you will most likely be trying to play catchup with an adversary. It’s important to expose the clients to the different aspects of personal protection, not just punching, kicking and rolling on the ground. Every action should be launched from a foundation of intelligence and knowledge, with meaning behind every movement.

ASJ What about your background. How long have you been training?

BW I’ve been training since the age of five. I started with self-defense and then moved my way through multiple disciplines, including mixed martial arts, private security, firearm and carry-permit instructor, range-safety officer, executive protection, medical training such as medic first aid, CPR, AED, etc. In total, I have about 25 years of training and experience and have trained with military, law enforcement and private security operators.

ASJ We noticed that you have an impressive team of instructors who work with you. Can you share a little bit about their background and why they are so valuable to your regime?

BW Absolutely! Samson Ferrell comes from a military and private-security background. He is a combat medic and is adept at close-quarter combat, as well as thermal and mechanical breaching. Joe Reese is also former military, second-degree black belt in hapkido and is a kali instructor. Stephen Nuchols (pronounced knuckles) has over 24 years of martial arts experience and is a fourth-degree black belt (yondan) in isshin-ryu karate, second-degree black belt (nidan) in daito-ryu aiki-jujutsu and instructs Deprisa kali. Bobby Parker is our expert in all things Marine Corps weapons systems. He was an instructor at the military operations in urban terrain (MOUT) facility, overseeing thousands of Marines, and has an extensive background with firearms and military applications.
ASJ What skill level would someone need to have to train with you?

BW We teach everyone from age 14 to 90. It doesn’t matter if you have no experience at all or are a well-seasoned veteran. We have programs just for you.

ASJ So, you teach civilians?

BW Oh, yes! We teach the science of being a warrior. That’s what it is, after all, a science. Each individual has their own capabilities and limitations, and as educators, it is our job to help each person find their perfect equation for survival and to help them combat the universal human phobia: another human being trying to harm or kill them. It’s our mission to help the community be a safer place by educating people to be ready to protect themselves and help their fellow neighbor when the opportunity arises.

ASJ What about the facility where you train?

One of the many things that sets RBTT apart from other operations is their ability to cover the entire spectrum of training, from firearms to hand-to-hand combat and crisis management to intervention. A company spokesman maintains it is a “one-stop shop” for all things self-defense.

One of the many things that sets RBTT apart from other operations is their ability to cover the entire spectrum of training, from firearms to hand-to-hand combat and crisis management to intervention. A company spokesman maintains it is a “one-stop shop” for all things self-defense.

BW Our 80,000-square-foot, state-of-the-art training facility is filled with buildings, obstacles and vehicles to give the student a realistic setting. As students make their way through dynamic scenarios, we add sound effects so more of their senses are engaged. We have classrooms, a lounge and a state-certified shooting range where we conduct move-and-shoot drills with all sorts of awkward obstacles to navigate.

ASJ What are some examples of courses you offer?

BW Well, a few basic examples would be elite fighting arts, firearm and edged weapon handling, medic first-aid training, risk and crisis management, bomb incident management, ground control, the psychological aspects of combat, victimology – the list goes on.

ASJ What is your motto or mission statement?

BW Our mission is to provide some of the best and realistic personal protection training out there. When seconds count and help is minutes away, rely on your reality-based tactical training and always look left, look right and stay tight!

ASJ From what we understand, Brian, you do just that. Thank you for taking the time to talk to us today.

BW My pleasure. Thank you. 

When training for the real world, shouldn’t you train in the real world?

When training for the real world, shouldn’t you train in the real world?

Editor’s note: For more on RBTT, see realitybasedtactical.com.

Posted in Training Tagged with: , , , , , ,

November 1st, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

[su_heading size=”30″]TOP 10 Blades Of 2015[/su_heading]

TOP 10 Blades 2015

BLADE CATEGORIES

 

Hunting / SurvivalCold Steel

 Warcraft Tanto

Cold Steel Warcraft Tanto

[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥ Wield this thing once and you may never let go. The weight and balance alone immediately lets the user know they are handling a profound tool. A true blade of blades.
Style Tanto
Overall Length 12 3/4 inches
Blade length 7.5 inches
Blade material Steel U.S. CPM 3-V High Carbon
Blade thickness 5 mm
Blade width 1.5 inches
Handle material G10 Glass epoxy
Overall weight 13 ounces
Features Diamond like coating – Highly rust and scratch resistant
Comes with Secure-Ex sheath. Extremely well balanced as a survival blade
All business
MSRP $329.99

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Hatchet / Axespyderco-logoo

H01 SzaboHawk Tactical Tomahawk


Spyderco Axe
[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]

♥ It’s not just a tool, it’s a close-combat weapon, and offers a curved handle that places the center of balance midway along its length. That makes this axe faster!
Style Tomahawk
Overall Length 11.88 inches
Blade Length 4.89 inches
Blade material D2 Tool Steel, TiCN Coated
Blade thickness 0.30 inches
Handle material G10
Overall weight 24.7 ounces
MSRP $349.95

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Editor’s PickTops-color-logo

Baja 4.5

 

TOPS Baja 4.5
[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]

♥ It comes with a fire-starter flint because yes, this is for those types. A rugged blade with a handle meant for gripping in the wettest and messiest of outdoor survival situations. Makes us want to go outside bearing it in our teeth and growl a lot.
Style Spear point
Overall Length 9.25 inches
Blade length 4.88 inches
Blade material 1095 RC 56-58
Blade thickness 0.160 inches
Blade width 1.25 inches
Handle material Green canvas micarta
Overall weight 6.2 ounces
MSRP: $160

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Folding / PocketOntario-Knife-Company-Logo

Joe Pardue Folding Knife

ONTARIO KNIVES Ontario knife utilitac 1-a
[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥ Designed by Joe Pardue. Clean, simple, ease of use. Not over the top. Only five moving parts on this Tactical-assisted opening mechanism
Style Drop point
Overall length 8 inches
Blade length 3.2 inches
Blade material AUS-8 steel
Blade thickness .12 inches
Blade width 1 inch
Handle material Zytel
Overall weight 4.5 ounces
MSRP: $76.25

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FixedHOGUE

EX-F02 point blade 4.5

Hogue
[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥ It’s all about the grip. The overmolded rubber give the perfect grip and spongy effect while still maintaining a hard solid frame. Just so we are clear, it’s the grip of the knife we are talking about here.
Style Spear point
Overall length 9 inches
Blade length 4.50 inches
Blade material 154CM
Blade thickness 0.16 inches
Handle material Polymer and overmolded rubber
Overall weight 4.77 ounces
MSRP $149.95

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InnovativeSOG

Switch Plier 2.0 Quick release Multi-tool

SOG Plier open[su_frame]Why we love this blade,…um, contraption[/su_frame]
♥ It has a spring-assist opening, allowing the user to access and open it single handedly. That’s ridiculously brilliant!
Style Multiple
One handed use
Twelve tools which include:
Blade steel type 420
Three-sided file
Awl
Bolt grip channel
Bottle opener
Can opener
Medium flat screwdriver
Multi-angle needle nose pliers
Needle Nose Pliers
Philips screwdriver
Ruler
MSRP $64

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Best ValueCRKT

KISS (Keep It Super Simple) Pocket knife

CRKT Kiss open
[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥ With it’ simplistic design, this little knife is the perfect companion and at a great price, plus it looks super techy.
Style Tanto
Overall length 5.75 inches
Blade length 2.25 inches
Blade material 3CR13 steel
Blade thickness 0.12 inches
Blade width Unknown
Handle material 3CR13 steel
Overall weight 2.3 ounces
MSRP: $39.99

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Concealedbenchmade-logo

Adamas Backup Dagger 175BKSN

 

[#Beginning of Shooting Data Section] Nikon D800 2015/06/22 20:19:25.40 Time Zone and Date: UTC-8, DST:ON RAW (14-bit) Image Size: L (7360 x 4912), FX Lens: VR 105mm f/2.8G Artist: Adam Michaud                         Copyright: New World Industries                                   Focal Length: 105mm Exposure Mode: Manual Metering: Matrix Shutter Speed: 1/100s Aperture: f/18 Exposure Comp.: 0EV Exposure Tuning: ISO Sensitivity: ISO 100 Optimize Image: White Balance: Flash, 0, 0 Focus Mode: AF-S AF-Area Mode: Wide Area AF Fine Tune: -- VR: OFF Long Exposure NR: OFF High ISO NR: ON (Normal) Color Mode: Color Space: Adobe RGB Tone Comp.: Hue Adjustment: Saturation: Sharpening: Active D-Lighting: OFF Vignette Control: High Auto Distortion Control: OFF Picture Control: [NL] NEUTRAL Base: [NL] NEUTRAL Quick Adjust: - Sharpening: 2 Contrast: 0 Brightness: 0 Saturation: 0 Hue: 0 Filter Effects: Toning: Map Datum: Dust Removal: 2015/04/14 05:34:25 Image Comment: New World Industries                 [#End of Shooting Data Section]
[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥ Sweet hidden little dagger for all those special moments
Style Double edge spear point
Overall length 5.47 inches
Blade length 2.50 inches
Blade material 440C steel
Blade thickness 0.125 inches
Blade width 1 inch
Handle material Vinyl coated tang
Overall weight 2.32ounces
MSRP: $105

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TacticalAttelboro Knives

The Attleboro Knife

 

The Attelboro Knife

[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥ Built by special forces and ultimate outdoor Grizzly Adam’s types. This knife is totally for the tough guys and has a glass breaker, because that’s what you need.
Style                                   Spear point
Overall Length                   9¾ inches
Blade length                       4½ inches
Blade material                    S35VN Steel
Blade thickness                 .150 inches
Blade width                       1 3/8 inches
Blade coating                    Cerakote Finish
Handle material                Phenolic canvas laminated
Overall weight                  6.1 ounces
Features                          Spear point with uniquely-angled serration’s on a portion of the blade                                         and only on the right side. Ergonomically designed for both large and                                         smaller hands. Butt of the knife features a beveled glass breaker
MSRP $295

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Historic / Replica

Steve Auvenshine

Steve Auvenshire Contemporary Makers Blog Art Riser

[su_frame]Why we love this blade[/su_frame]
♥Anytime you mix the authenticity of a master craftsman’s skill from a long gone era, with the ingenuity of a master craftsman of today, you end up with something of beauty.
Style Spear point
Overall length 7.25 inches
Blade length 4 inches
Blade material Forged 1084 tool steel
Blade detail The climbing vine design on the spine was created using needle files
Historical era Typical of a small patch knife from the 18th through mid 19th centuries
Handle material Whitetail antler
Blade design The knife has a pewter bolster with a hidden tang and the blade was finished with a chemical etch.
MSRP Custom

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Congratulations

to all of the

Top Blades of 2015

We will see you next year!

We look forward to the next round of the TOP 10.
 GOOD LUCK!

10-Top-HolstersTop-10-Targets

American Shooting Journal
Executive Editor Danielle Breteau
Media, Inc.
Executive Editor Danielle Breteau
14240 Interurban Avenue South
Suite number 190
Tukwila, Washington 9816

 

Posted in Top 10 Tagged with: , , , , , , ,