handguns Archives - Page 2 of 2 -
October 22nd, 2015 by AmSJ Staff

[su_heading size=”27″ margin=”0″]Bond Arms Snake Slayer IV Derringer[/su_heading]

Story and photographs by Tom Claycomb III

I’ve never classified a gun as a fun gun to shoot, but that’s how I would describe the double-barreled Bond Arms Snake Slayer IV derringer. Bond makes a variety of calibers and styles, but I decided to go with the IV due to the longer 4¼-inch barrel, which I had hoped would be a bit more accurate, have less recoil and tighter groups.

The Snake Slayer IV can handle .45 Long Colts and 2¾- and 3-inch .410s. I guess it was really designed as a concealed-carry gun, but I wanted to use it against snakes while fishing. It would also be good for shooting big halibut before you boat them. A .410 will do the job nicely and not ricochet.

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The first time I shot the Snake Slayer IV, my daughter Kolby joined me. Just as I set up a target, a ground squirrel ran out. I had a 2 ¾ ounce No.6 chambered and killed it at 20 feet.

Every time my daughter Kolby and I go fishing in Oregon, we see rattlesnakes. One year I heard her scream – a snake had jumped in the boat with us. On another trip on a river in Idaho, I saw six rattlesnakes and one of those floated right by me. That would have caused panic if it had tried to crawl up on the driest thing around, which was my head!

While in town, I originally thought to carry my Slayer with .45 Long Colts, but then I tested the new Winchester PDX-1 shells. Wow, they’re bad – in a good way! They have four discs and 16 BBs. They would stop a bad guy in his tracks. I shot various loads through the gun, and the first time I used the PDX-1 it made my jaw drop. It was noticeably devastating.

Snake SlayerBond SSIV

The Snake Slayer IV can interchange 20 barrels for a range of 25 different calibers.

The first rattle out of the box with a .45 Long Colt, I managed a 2½-inch group at 10 and 15 feet using Hornady’s 185-grain Critical Defense ammo. That would be more than enough to stop a bad guy – that’s a big bullet! But, like I said before, my main use for this gun would be to shoot snakes, and after shooting a .410 with No. 6 shot, I found that it had a wicked pattern, so I’m pretty confident it would work as a self-protection load as well.

When I took my Slayer out for some extensive shooting, I managed a 4-inch group at 15 feet, but I’m not renowned for being a great pistol shot. I then shot groups of two out of the same barrel and managed 2-inch groups, so there is a little variation between barrels, as you would imagine. Not a big factor, though, because it’s a short-range weapon.

I need to point out that the gun is diverse because you can interchange 20 different barrels, or 25 different calibers with one base unit. That has to make these one of the most versatile guns on the market.

It is a heavy, nice-looking and well-made duty pistol designed to last for generations. I also love that it has an equally nice and heavy-duty leather holster that is form-fitted with a latch to hold the gun securely.

Bond Arms has transformed the lowly derringer into a linebacker. ASJ

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While fishing, a watersnake swam within a foot of me. This is why I carry the Snake Slayer IV. IT can readily be used as a great concealed-carry gun too.

 

Posted in Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , , ,

March 7th, 2015 by AmSJ Staff

tuellerD2
Tueller drill principles has been taught to Cadettes and seasoned Officers/Agents throughout law enforcement nation wide, includes agencies such as the FBI and DEA. The objective is sound for teaching to a wide variety of skill level and to retain it quickly. You can view some of our past article on Tueller drill here.

But, what if the gun fighter was at an elite level in terms of competency and skills that’s off the chart like G.I. Joe. (no pun intended)The video below highlights two extremely skilled in respective arts. (knife, gun)

Doug Marcaida background is in the Filipino Martial Arts of Kali, utilizing the knife is considered the advance part of this training. Instructor Zero of Spartan 360 Tactical Defense is the Elite gun fighter, his skills as a fast shooter can be heard and seen from here to abroad.

So let’s get to the meat of this video. The instructors described the goal of this video as a learning tool to break the 21-foot rule and may only apply to one with higher skill sets. Enjoy!

Posted in Tactics & Tips Tagged with: , ,

February 27th, 2015 by AmSJ Staff

The video below highlights some simple pistol drills emphasizing fast shooting for those that aspire to be at “Operative” level for any Tactical team. Zero is the head instructor of the Italy-based Spartan 360° Tactical Defense. Zero demonstrates some basic fundamentals in handling the pistol and works the Mozambique and One to One drill. Breakdown of drills are:

chest2Chest Position – Hands holding pistol up to the chest and scan your area while being mindful of where the muzzle is facing.

Mozambique Drill – Standing 5 yards from the target, draw from the holster and put two rounds in the chest and one to the head as fast and accurately as you can.

One to One Drill – From 5 yards away, draw from the holster and fire one round, reload and fire one more round as fast as you can.

Posted in Tactics & Tips Tagged with:

July 2nd, 2013 by jhines

air_marshallThere is one professionals that you won’t hear too much about and they are considered to be some of the best marksman at close quarter, yes even better than most FBI agents. They are the Federal Air Marshals that protect passengers while in flight. Though FAM was created in 1963 by President John F Kennedy, it wasn’t until the aftermath of 9/11 that their services were fully utilized.

If you’re going to try to take down a terrorist on an airplane, there’s no better way to prepare for that, than to train on a plane.

That’s what United States Air Marshals do in a plain-looking office building, near Orlando, in south Florida.

Shooting on a plane is not like in the movies. The federal air marshals cannot miss.

And they don’t because missing means hitting innocent bystanders, or it means putting a hole in the side of the plane.

“We train so much and so hard. We try to throw in every scenario possible, just so when that day comes, we’re ready,” said one marshal who spoke with Local 6.

The Department of Homeland Security said the accuracy scores of these airplane police are better than the FBI, Secret Service or any other agency.


You can see how good they are when you see the walls of their mockup airliner.

The Federal Air Marshal Tactical Pistol Course (TPC), like the classic El Presidente, is shot cold (i.e., no warmup) on the FBI QIT target.
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe bullets they use are filled with paint (simunitions) and once they finish shooting, there are no large blotches outside the targets, just a few splatters that scatter from direct hits.

“As a police officer on the street, you can fall back and take cover,” the agent said. “When you’re in the tube, it’s you and the bad guy. You’ve got to engage.”

In any situation they are all armed, but you’d never know it, and you’d never know they’re on your flight. That means regular clothing, and cover stories if they end up sitting next to a chatty, curious commuter.

They train to blend in until a crisis forces them out of their seat and into action to extinguish the incident.

“There’s a lot of training that goes into it, a lot of time spent in the simulator and at the range to ensure that we’re the best at what we do, and I can guarantee there’s no one better,” said the agent. Here’s a typical course of fire that you must pass in order to perform duty.qit-99tc-a
am_course_of_fire
Something else Local 6 learned about air marshals is they don’t just patrol the skies. They’re on trains, in stadiums, even at landmarks or any place that a lot of people gather.

The department of homeland security has realized they can use their specialized skills for all sorts of situations and not just protecting people on planes.

Source:Erik Von Achken

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Posted in Law Enforcement Tagged with: