May 31st, 2018 by asjstaff

You’ve probably heard that the US military is replacing the M16/M4 and looking into new rifles and ammo.  (US Army and Marine Corp) Wondering why they’re looking into 6.5 Creedmoor in particular? No, its not because the Russians are out gunning us. Here’s the scoop.

There are a couple things you should know about 6.5 Creedmoor and today, we’ll put this round into sharper focus for you.  So let’s look at it in more detail so that you’ll see why it works for the military and why it could work for you.

Creedmoor Kicks Ass at Long Range

6.5mm Creedmore Cartridge
6.5 Creedmoor Cartridge

Right off the bat, the US Special Operations Command understood all the good things about this cartridge as an alternative to its existing ammo.
The cartridge was introduced in 2008 as one of the first and best cartridges for precision long range shooting.

At the time, there weren’t a lot of civilians shooting long range, but in recent years, the company has seen demand grow in the hunting industry, and grow as manufacturers continue to put out more affordable long range rifles.
Today, it is the go-to cartridge for many hunters and competitive shooters.

Long Distance Shooters
Long Distance Shooters Love Creedmoor

Precision long range shooting skill a learned trait which is an advantage to have in combat and the military seems to be catching onto Creedmoor’s awesome reputation and populatiry for shooting close and tight precision groups at 500 yards or more.

Having a bigger bullet means you’ll do bigger damage to your target, whether your target is a tango or a blood thirsty wild hog.  

Our brothers in arms go through enough shit.  The last thing they need is hellish recoil.
If there’s one thing you won’t get with 6.5 Creedmoor, is its crazy blowback.

US Military in Desert
These guys don’t need to be dealing with blowback.

6.5 Creedmoor is specially designed for low recoil rounds without compromising pinpoint accuracy.
Did you also know that it can go subsonic after 1,300 yards?

When it comes to tactical applications, this cartridge packs a serious wallop

6.5 Creedmoor vs.  .308 Winchester

There are some long range groups think that there aren’t any real differences between 6.5 Creedmoor and the long-established .308 Win.
But those people would be ill-informed.
The truth is, they are very similar, however there are some things in which they differ.

First there is the huge gap between the two when it comes to ballistics.  6.5 Creedmoor loads can reach a thousand yards with less than three hundred inches of drop with proper windage.  
This is true of just about any ammo, particularly Hornady 178 grain HPBT, that is used with a 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge.  
The .308 Win doesn’t compare to that kind of numbers.

6.5 Creedmore and .308 Winchester Cartridges Compared
The Cartridges Compared

Another area in which 6.5 Creedmoor often bests .308 Win is in its accessibility.  
A lot of .308 ammo is out of stock when you visit
the major online ammo dealers.
But if you run a search for Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor 140 gr AMAX, they’re everywhere.

And thats the other thing that is very good news for the military and all of us: there are plenty of dealers – large and small – from which they could order 6.5 ammo in bulk.

Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor
Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor

Another argument that comes up is about barrel longevity, claiming that the 6.5 Creedmoor only last for 2-3,000 rounds whereas the .308 Win will be good for as many as 10,000 rounds.

This is simply bogus since it all depends on whether you’re shooting 1 MOA.
Theres just no way that the .308 could be reaching that mark at 10,000.

If you’re using it with a precision rifle or for seasonal deer shooting, you’re going to go long ways with your 6.5 Creedmoor, no if, and, or buts..about it, except the butt you put a bullet in.

And thats another thing.  Combat isn’t always what it looks like in movies and on TV.  For those that have served can tell you that there are many days where you don’t see much action and, even when you do, its not necessarily a rapid fire situation.
But Murphy’s law does exist when the shit hits the fan.

If you’re an active duty sniper (Marksman Observer), you’re gonna get a whole lot more life outta your 6.5 Creedmoor than you would with the .308.

Solving the Problem
What’s really crazy about the 6.5 versus .308 argument is the simple fact that 6.5 Creedmoor was specifically conceived to be a cartridge that would be superior to the wildcat cartridges of the day.
As the story goes at the Civilian Marksmanship Program 2007 National Matches at Camp Perry, Hornady engineer Dave Emary decided to remedy what he saw as a problem among competitive shooters.

Dave Emary
The Man Himself

As Emary saw it, people were trying to push their cartridges to the limit, attempting to defy the laws of physics by brainstorming methods by which to get their cartridges to perform at levels that weren’t made to.  Problems would then crop up as a result of these jeri-rigging formulas.

In Emary’s own words, “People were having a lot of problems with functioning the 6mms.  They were running these things at very high pressures to try to get the performance they need to compete.”
“Our solution was to go to a 6.5, firing a lot higher BC bullet, and not have to push it as hard to get what they wanted.”

Dave Emary in the Hornady Workshop
Dave Emary in the Hornady Workshop

Emary and his team solved this problem by taking existing .264 cartridges and altering the specs, giving the cartridge the capacity for long-ogive, high-ballistic rounds.
Lo and behold the 6.5 was born, a short-action rifle cartridge capable of insane performance.

Make Your Hunting Experience a Good One

Like I said earlier, this cartridge isn’t just a slam dunk for the military should they end up choosing it over the others they’ve been testing.
Its also a damn good option for almost any civilian hunter or gun enthusiast.

If you didn’t hear the news: USSOCOM has adopted the 6.5 CM as their new Precision Rifle cartridge. It was a close call between the 260 Remington and the 6.5 Creedmoor, but the 6.5 CM won the day due to the military’s belief that the 6.5 CM has more room for innovation for the future.

Many target shooters have taken to the Ruger Precision Rifleand my targets gets shredded to pieces.  The results are always incredible.  At long range, many are saying the the CM leave 2.8 inches at five hundred yards.

Ruger Precision Rifle

Ruger Precision Rifle

But the advantages for game hunters is where this one really shines.  Its got a sick muzzle velocity due to its extra powder space and its able to accommodate a wealth of different medium-burning rifle powders.

If you’re anything like me, you wouldn’t automatically think of long-range shooting when it comes to big game.  After all, ethical hunting requires limiting your range to as short as possible to ensure a clean kill. 

That being said, it should also stand to reason that if 6.5 Creedmoor can take out a target at 500 yards, its going to take care of business at 100 yards with no problem.

Long Range Hunting
If you can kill it from this far away, then you can kill it from just about anywhere in between.

From personal experience, I’ve seen how this can perform in a close quarters situations and I was every bit as impressed as I was when I hunted with the .308.
The round went right where I wanted it to and I bagged a deer without a rechamber.  Like I said: clean humane kill.

Why 6.5 Creedmoor is Awesome for Target Shooting

Better grouping and more affordable ammo makes the 6.5 Creedmoor a no-brainer for those who camp out a lot at the firing range.

Holes in Target from a 6.5 Creedmoor
Holes in Target from a 6.5 Creedmoor

When we take into account the rising cost of ammo in the last few years and the scrutiny that many firearm and ammo companies have faced, 6.5 ammo maintains a reasonable price point and remains readily available.

Bulk Ammo Storage
And cheaper when you buy in bulk. so stock up.

And when it comes to high-end ballistics, you can’t beat these suckers.  The BC numbers on these bad boys are awe-inspiring (approximately .610 G1 at 140 grain).  If you’re looking to impress, you really can’t go wrong with the 6.5’s remarkable 1,400 fps at 1,000 yards(!).

Best 6.5 CM Ammo

If you want the very best from this cartridge, you’ll have to get into reloading. You can start with our Beginner’s Guide To Reloading But if you’re not into that, then you’ll need something you can pick up at the store.

Training/Plinking

If you’re on the range to have fun, you don’t want to spend a fortune. But this also isn’t the kind of caliber that you buy cheap, crappy ammo for – you’ll want something that shoots consistent and for a fair price.

Sellier & Bellot is what you’re looking for, from 9mm to 6.5CM they make a good product for a good price.

Sellier & Bellot 6.5 Creedmoor 140g FMJBT - 20 Rounds

Sellier & Bellot 6.5 Creedmoor 140g FMJBT – 20 Rounds

Match Grade Long-Range Target

Of course, once you’re ready to really stretch your legs and see what this bad boy can do – it’s time to get out the good stuff!

Match grade ammo isn’t cheap, but it is amazing. Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor Extremely Low Drag match bullet is outstanding for factory ammo. Your mileage may vary, but I’ve been getting half-MOA with this ammo.

Hornady Match 6.5 Creedmoor 120gn ELD Match - 20 Rounds

Hornady Match 6.5 Creedmoor 147gn ELD Match – 20 Rounds

Prices accurate at time of writing

Hunting

When it comes to hunting ammo, you want great ammo. Not only for accuracy but also with a bullet that will expand and do a lot of damage to your target to ensure a clean, humane kill.

Hornady with their Super Shock Tip bullets gives that every time. A polymer tip gives you the ballistics of FMJ with the expansion and killing power of a hollow-point.

Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor 129 gr SST Polymer Tip - 20 Rounds

Hornady 6.5 Creedmoor 129 gr SST Polymer Tip – 20 Rounds

Prices accurate at time of writing

Best 6.5 CM Rifles

A cool cartridge is only as good as the weapon that throws it, just like a weapon that throws it is only as good as what it throws.

Hunting Rifle

For a budget hunting rifle, it’s hard to beat the Savage Arms 12 FV – not only is this a solid rifle out of the box, but it is at a price that is hard to beat. I commonly see this is the $370-$410 range. 

Savage Arms 12 FV

Savage Arms 12 FV

Prices accurate at time of writing

Long-Range Precision Target Rifle

I already said it, but when it comes to long-range target shooting the Ruger Precision Rifle is just too good to beat. For the price, the options, the aftermarket, and the out-of-the-box quality – you want this rifle.

Ruger Precision Rifle

Ruger Precision Rifle

Honorable Mention Rifle

A dedicated rifle for every role is the dream for many of us, but if you don’t have the room in your safe (or your budget) for that then you might want to consider a middle of the road do-it-all rifle.

The Tikka T3x is that rifle. Rugged, lightweight, smooth as butter action and outstanding trigger – a Tikka T3x is my go-to hunting rifle.

On the precision side, Tikka offers a 1 MOA from the factory guarantee and lives up to it!

Best Scopes for 6.5 CM Rifles

Once you have your ammo and rifle picked out,  you’ll want to invest in a quality scope.  Depending on what role your 6.5 Creedmoor will be filling you might want a couple of scopes!

For hunting, you’ll generally want something a little lower magnification, like this Vortex Crossfire II 2-7x.

Crossfire II 2-7x32 by Vortex

Crossfire II 2-7×32 by Vortex

But if you’re looking to do some real precision shooting, really put this cartridge to the test, then you’ll need something with a LOT more magnification: Vortex Golden Eagle 15-60x fills the bill!

Highest Magnification
Vortex Golden Eagle HD 15-60x52

Vortex Golden Eagle HD 15-60×52

Other Accessories

Another important thing to keep in mind when purchasing any cartridge is maintenance.  If you’re going to be participating in extended shooting sessions, you should always bring along the proper gear for cleaning your rifle and cartridge.  Maintenance will help you to sustain that pinpoint precision you’re hoping for.

I always take my J Dewey Rods’ Complete Bolt Action Rifle Cleaning Kit with me when I know I’m gonna spend all day at the range or out in the field.  The 6.5 kit costs around $30 and includes everything I need for proper upkeep.

J Dewey Rods

J Dewey Rods’ Complete Bolt Action Rifle Cleaning Kit

Prices accurate at time of writing

You get a BAC Chamber Kit, a B-6.5 Bore brush, an M-22 Bore mop, a CH-308 Chamber brush and a 100 count of P-221 1 ½” Round Patches.

Closing Thoughts

So what’s the bottom line? Quite simply, 6.5 Creedmoor is a formidable cartridge for tactical and target shooting applications alike.  

At the end of the day, the battle between 6.5 Creedmoor and .308 Winchester will wage on, but I think it’s clear that 6.5 Creedmoor isn’t going anywhere.

If anything, it’s only going to continue to grow in popularity as more and more long range shooters embrace it.  

What about you! Did you get the 6.5 Creedmoor? Take any game this year with it? Do you agree with the military adopting it? Let us know in the comments!

Reviews by Megan Kriss, revised by ASJ Staff

Posted in Ammo Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 22nd, 2018 by asjstaff

Eyes and ears…the two most important things to have at the shooting range.  You don’t want to end up like this guy…

Eye Patch Guy
Eye Patch Bro

We bought 6 of the most popular ones across different price points and tried them out with several buddies over a bunch of range trips.

Tested Shooting Glasses
Tested Shooting Glasses

By the end, you’ll know which one is best for your budget and intended use.

Table of Contents

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Ballistic Eyewear Standards

When you get shooting glasses…you want to make sure they meet some standard of impact resistance.  Otherwise, what’s the point?

Testing Shooting Glasses
Testing Shooting Glasses, Clay Shooting Magazine

There are three major standards:

  • US Civilian: ANSI Z87.1
  • US Military: MIL-PRF-31013
  • European: EN166

It’s recommended the minimum to meet is the civilian ANSI Z87.1 and if you’re really at risk of frag or projectiles…to meet the US military specs.

Now that’s out of the way…let’s get on with the 6 best shooting glasses!

1. Wiley X Saber

Wiley X Saber
Wiley X Saber

My overall favorite for style, coverage, and protection is the Wiley X Saber.

It covers more angles and exceeds the military MIL-RF-31013 standards for impact resistance, UV protection, and optical clarity.

Nosepiece is pretty comfortable and adjustable while the frame is normal thickness.  It didn’t smush into my head when wearing electronic earmuffs.

Also light…but not the cheap kind of light.

Wiley X Saber, View
Wiley X Saber, View

Smoke grey is also perfect for sunny days or gloomy days like the above.

Editor’s Pick
Wiley X Saber Advanced Shooting Glasses

Wiley X Saber Advanced Shooting Glasses

Readers’ Ratings

5/5 (3)

Your Rating?

2. Radians Revelation

Radians Revelation Shooting Glasses
Radians Revelation Shooting Glasses

Radians Revelations are what I consider the bare minimum to get.  $8 bucks and available in a couple colors.  They are decent in style but I do feel their affordable price point in the construction.

Meets ANSI Z87.1+ standards for high-velocity impacts so they’ll protect your eyes.

One great thing is that the frames are pretty thin and can bend up at angles to match almost all faces.

Radian Frame Adjustments
Radian Frame Adjustments

I got the light smoke lens and it’s a good mix for daytime and when it starts getting dark (or indoors).

Radians Shooting Glasses, View
Radians Shooting Glasses, View
Most Affordable
Radians Revelation Protective Shooting Glasses

Radians Revelation Protective Shooting Glasses

3. Allen Over Shooting Glasses

Allen Shooting Glasses
Allen Over Shooting Glasses

All my people out there with prescription glasses…Allen Over Shooting Glasses don’t look sexy but it will go over most regular glasses.

If you have prescription sunglasses…make sure they are not glass since glass plus impact is not good.  I’d opt for something like this that meets ANSI Z87.1 standards.

I always wear contacts and regular shooting glasses at the range…but this one I wore my regular glasses at home for 3 hours.  It definitely adds weight but after a while, you don’t notice it.

The sides are a little thicker so it can interfere with earmuff style hearing protection.  I’d opt for earplugs when wearing these.

Allen Shooting Glasses, View
Allen Shooting Glasses, View

Smoke color isn’t too dark so it should be usable for indoors shooting.

Best for Glasses Wearers
Allen Over Shooting & Safety Glasses

Allen Over Shooting & Safety Glasses

4. Radians Clay Shooting Glasses

Radians Clay Shooting Glasses
Radians Clay Shooting Glasses

If you’re really into clay shooting…Radians Clay Shooting Glasses might be for you.

The color is meant to make the orange clays pop out.  It works somewhat and I like how there’s no frame on the top to obstruct views…especially when looking upwards.

Nose is not that comfortable since it’s not adjustable.  But the frame is a thin wire so earmuffs are not a problem.  Very light overall but also a little flimsy.

Meets ANSI Z87.1+ standards for higher velocity.

Radians Clay, View
Radians Clay, View

If only I could pull off red lenses…

Best for Clay Shooting
Radians Clay Pro Shooting & Safety Glasses

Radians Clay Pro Shooting & Safety Glasses

5. Oakley Radar

Oakley Radar with Prizm Range Lens
Oakley Radar

You can never go wrong with Oakley.

I’ve been rocking the Oakley Radar for years since it has great coverage, meets the standards, and has different sized nose pieces.

It feels great even with earmuffs and never falls off when I’m sweaty.

Oakley Radar, View
Oakley Radar, View

I also like how it makes the colors pop out and it does help a little when I’m shooting with fiber optic sights.

Oakley Radar

Oakley Radar

Prices accurate at time of writing

Another Oakley pair that was designed specifically for shooting is the Oakley Tombstone that doesn’t have the top frame.  There’s the Spoil version for smaller heads and the Reap for normal/larger heads.

Oakley Tombstone
Oakley Tombstone

6. Smith Aegis Echo II

Smith Aegis Echo II
Smith Aegis Echo II

I really like the Smith Aegis Echo II.  It has everything I want in a frame…

Meets ALL three standards, has great coverage, and fit everyone that tried it because of the adjustable nose piece.  Think Oakley’s “Asian Fit” for us with smaller noses.

Smith Aegis Echo II Adjustable Nosepiece
Smith Aegis Echo II Adjustable Nosepiece

Also has a super thin frame that doesn’t get caught up in even tight earmuffs.

Smith Aegis Echo II Thin Temple
Smith Aegis Echo II Thin Temple

It feels quality and that means a little more weight than the others.

My only complaint is that the frame that’s “missing” in the top middle makes it a little bit too aggressive.  One person asked if I was on SWAT and another if I was from the Matrix.

Otherwise…it comes with a case and two lenses so you can shoot in both day and low-light.

Smith Aegis Echo II with Accessories
Smith Aegis Echo II with Accessories

This is my pick for something more premium that really protects your eyes and has you set for whatever environment.  As long as you can pull off the look.

Editor’s Premium Pick
Smith Optics 2015 Aegis Echo II Compact Elite Tactical Eyeshields

Smith Optics 2015 Aegis Echo II Compact Elite Tactical Eyeshields

Prices accurate at time of writing

Conclusion

Tested Shooting Glasses, Side
Tested Shooting Glasses, Side

There you have it…my pick for the affordable range is the Wiley X Saber.

Editor’s Pick
Wiley X Saber Advanced Shooting Glasses

Wiley X Saber Advanced Shooting Glasses

While for those that enjoy the finer things in life (and want extra protection and lenses)…the Smith Aegis Echo II.

Editor’s Premium Pick
Smith Optics 2015 Aegis Echo II Compact Elite Tactical Eyeshields

Smith Optics 2015 Aegis Echo II Compact Elite Tactical Eyeshields

Prices accurate at time of writing

Now that your eyes are protected…get yourself the best ear protection out there too.  We cover everything in-hand from earplugs to all the most popular electronic earmuffs in Best Shooting Ear Protection.

The post 6 Best Shooting Glasses [Hands-On & Real Views] appeared first on Pew Pew Tactical.

Posted in Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , ,

May 22nd, 2018 by asjstaff

Not Exactly

We all love action movies and chances are you’ve probably seen the movie John Wick and maybe the sequel John Wick: Chapter 2 as well.  

The action in these movies are very cool to watch, the choreograph is well designed. The credit goes to Taran Butler, the man who trained Keanu Reeves to tactical shoot that looks impressive in the movie.

We also learned that filming has begun on the third (final?) chapter in the series, and that got us thinking about the films, particularly the shooting techniques that were used in them.

Now, for those of you who haven’t seen the film, or read articles on it, the directors, stunt coordinators, and the actors themselves all went out of their way to make the stunts and gun handling in the film as accurate as possible to real life.
In other words some of them actually went through similar tactical shooting courses.

So what you’re probably wondering is what this article is all about.

In the above picture you see Keanu tilting his gun to the side like that, its not for Hollywood cool looks, but is actually a real shooting technique created by law enforcement trainer Paul Castle.

paul castle
Paul Castle, inventor of CAR

Before his untimely death due to cancer in 2011, Castle developed what he called the Center Axis Relock (CAR) system as an alternative to modern weaver and isosceles stances.

So we’ve established that its a real thing, and not simply movie stuff, but is it worth learning?

Lets take a Peek

Why Center Axis Relock was Created

Most self-defense scenarios happen at very close range, in confined spaces, usually within 8-10 feet, or less.

The problem with moving in a confined space in a traditional stance is that you have the gun way out in front of you, as taught in the Weaver or Isoceles.  This gives you very poor leverage in the event someone gets their hands on your gun.

Isosceles Stance
Isosceles Stance

The CAR system allows for less time between drawing and getting the target in your sights, as well as providing better weapon retention. Having the pistol closer to the body allows better leverage and control.

real close distance
AKA Real close distance

For shooting and moving, or shooting at the range, a standard isosceles/weaver stance could be a better choice, but what about shooting inside a narrow hallway, or from a vehicle?  
What about when the target is already at contact distance, maybe even inside where your arms would normally be in an isosceles stance?

The CAR system is the answer to these problems.  For this reason, it was never intended to replace the weaver or isosceles stance (though we recommend the latter) but was meant to be another transition tool in your tactical shooting method.

One more tool to keep you alive.  

Here’s How the Center Axis Relock System Work

There are two main parts to the CAR system, each a shooting stance in its own right, and each with a specific purpose.

  • First, there’s the High position.  This is what you’ll be drawing into, with your body facing perpendicular to your target.  The support (non-gun-holding) hand clears clothing or other obstructions while the strong hand brings the pistol up and close to the chest.
  •  

  • The support hand then moves up (be careful to never sweep the muzzle over your support hand) and meets the strong (gun-holding) hand from beneath.

At this point, your weak-side foot should be at a 90-degree angle to your target, and the barrel of your gun should be up, level, and pointed at the target. 

Although not a goal or recommendation, it is possible to place accurate fire at a target within contact range from here if you really needed to. You can also use your elbows to get distance from your attacker.

CAR high position
Be sure to check out this article from GunsAmerica writer Wayne Lincourt that goes over the fine details of drawing into the CAR system.

This is your ready position.

From here, you have the option of transitioning to the Extended position, whereby you rotate your support elbow down while rotating your strong hand up to bring the sights of the firearm up into alignment with your strong eye (read up on Cross-dominant shooting if you aren’t sure which eye is your strong eye).

CAR extended position.
This is the extended position.

This is the position you’ll use for accurate aimed fire at range.  From here you can engage targets as normal, using your support hand to pull back on the gun, while using your strong hand to push it forward towards the target.

This creates a very stable, yet flexible “locked-in” firing position, while also presenting as small of a target as possible to your attacker.

Level 1 CAR System
You can watch this video for an idea of how the transition works.

What’s the CAR System Good For?

The main goal of the CAR system is to get your sights on the target quickly while maintaining solid weapon retention and a stable firing position. This overall will improve the hit rate.

It does this by using your body’s instinctive reactions and gross motor functions in a high-stress situation.  In such a situation, you may have trouble getting your sights aligned quickly, and if you are not strongly dominant with one eye or the other, it may be difficult to quickly choose the correct sight picture.

vortex viper red dot
This is less of an issue if you’re using a red dot optic on your pistol, but still worth thinking about.

The Center Axis Relock addresses these issues in two ways.  One, the first position, or High position, is designed to facilitate the maximum point-shooting ability for engaging a target that’s already at contact distance.

If you have an assailant in your face, punching the firearm out towards them gives them ample opportunity to begin wrestling for your gun, which is a dire situation indeed.
From the High position of the CAR system, it is much harder for such an assailant to get their hands on the gun in a way that will allow them to take it from you.

It also makes it very easy to point shoot without bringing the sights up, meaning you can stop an attack before it gets going.

If the target is further away and you need to utilize your weapon’s sights to make an accurate shot, the Extended position offers an easy-to-use position for quickly and cleanly bringing the gun up and into a firing position that still offers a stable shooting platform and good weapon retention, while also allowing utilizing the correct sight picture automatically.

What its Not Good For?

I truly believe the CAR system is something every defensive-minded shooter should learn.  Another tool to have in the “Tactical Shoot” toolbox. But it may not be for everyone.

The CAR system is not a replacement for the isosceles/weaver stance most modern shooters are more familiar with.  
This stance offers a better chance of moving, shooting and acquiring sights quickly.

Remember, unlike Hollywood movies, you want to be in as few gunfights as possible, and a well-armed banana peel retreat is better than a well-armed engagement any day.

The CAR system is also not great (in some opinion, there are those who disagree) for room entry.
If you enter a room with an attacker in an unknown location, you may have to pivot your entire body to make a shot, especially if the attacker is to your support side.

That being said, how often does that happen?  In most situations, if you have to draw your gun, you’re already reacting to a visual threat, probably one right in front of you.  For that, the CAR system is incredibly effective.
Again, this all depends on how the CAR system is used by the individual. The CAR system is a transition movement, for those that have never learned and used in a tactical situation like room clearing or a bus take down may not fully understand its usage.

The CAR system was designed for moving through confined spaces with your gun in a ready position that reduces the likelihood of your gun being taken from you.

Last Shot

The Center Axis Relock system is not a common shooting technique used by us normal folks but may have been popularized by Hollywood, but it is way more than just filmic flim-flam. This is a real-world technique, developed by a professional with over two decades of military and LEO experience.

And if used properly, as another tool in the “Tactical Shoot” toolbox, it can even save your life.

For more information, be sure to check out Sabre Tactical, the company founded by Paul Castle primarily to teach the CAR system.

Have you train with the CAR system? What do you think about it? Let us know below!

 

Sources: Matthew Collins, Sabre Tactical

Posted in Tactics & Tips Tagged with: , , ,

May 2nd, 2018 by asjstaff

These guys are pros.  Watch and learn:

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaand the hostiles are dead and the crowd loved it.  Time to crack a cold San Miguel Super Dry with the fellas and eat some lechón.

If Israel isn’t already doing this, I’d be shocked.  Gotta keep the AR without one in the chamber though over there.

Thoughts?  The only acceptable time to double one of your bros on your dirt bike?

Gat tip: pj_3gun

Posted in Fun, Training Tagged with: , , , , , ,

April 17th, 2018 by asjstaff

Long distance shooting is a bit like meteorology. You can go by feel, or you can make predictions to help you plan ahead.

No plan survives the first contact, but it gives you a fighting chance at least!

If you want to “call your shot” before you make them, a ballistics calculator is in order. Ballistic calculators are an all or nothing sort of thing, you need to know exactly what you’re doing, or it’ll send your rounds way off.

Tom Berenger Sniper
Unlike in the Movies, Most Precision Shooters Use Ballistic Calculators

If you’re willing to learn how to use them they can be the key that opens doors that were previously closed!

Purpose of a Ballistic Calculator

The purpose a ballistic calculator is important and is sometimes essential. Basically speaking, a ballistics calculator makes several calculations of given a data set.

That set includes the humidity, elevation, specifications of the round, and the expected velocity of the bullet given the rifle it’s fired out of.

Hangover Math Gif
Ballistic Calculators Make It So You Don’t Have To Do This In Your Head…

The calculations are so specific every shot you ever fire will be completely different.

You won’t have to waste ammunition trying to find out if your calculations are accurate because as soon as you calculate the shot, the variables have most likely changed, mother nature is a fickle woman.

The purpose of a ballistics calculator is to just get you close enough you can manually dial in your shot. Many people think a high-tech calculator will make the shots for you, and it won’t.

A calculator will save you money and time by getting you close but it won’t have you hitting the bullseye at 1,000 yards on the first shot.

Don’t Forget to….

Take Good Notes

Every single shot you make will be influenced by the internal and external ballistics of the round, this is one of many reasons why quality control of your ammunition is so important – consistency is everything!

But it’s not just the ammo that you’re trying to account for – you also have things that while you can measure and attempt to account for, you won’t be able to get it perfect every time.

Temperature, wind, humidity, atmospheric pressure, elevation difference between you and the target, the list goes on and gets exponentially more complex the longer the shot is.

If you enter in all of this information into a ballistics calculator can give you a good idea of how the shot will ring out, but it is just an educated guess.

You should be taking good notes on pen and paper to log each shot and shooting session to get a collection of good data to help you set up your calculator.

Storm Tactical "Heavy Paper" Modular Data Book

Storm Tactical “Heavy Paper” Modular Data Book

Prices accurate at time of writing

This is especially important for users who opt for low features applications on a smartphone. Many application won’t keep data over a long period of time, the best will, but you should always have a backup and keep the data somewhere safe, otherwise, you’ll waste a lot of ammunition and money when it comes time to shoot!

Phone Vs. Handheld Calculator

With the widespread use of smartphones coming into the scene just as more and more people are hitting targets at range, naturally, people looked to the ever-loved smartphone for help nailing targets.

While an application on your phone can provide basic data to help dial in dope for the shot you’re facing, almost every application on the market is not going to give as in-depth information as a dedicated ballistics computer.

They’ll be much easier to use but are slower to use and can eat up your phone battery quickly but can be excellent for shooting at targets within 1200-ish yards.

The benefits of a ballistics calculator are important for a competitive shooter, you don’t have to use your phone and it’s often faster with deeper features than any app on the market.

They have a very steep learning curve and they go very in depth with high degrees of precision if you know how to use it.  

The other major downside to a dedicated handheld calculator is the price…they aren’t cheap!

Kestrel Sportsman Weather Meter with Applied Ballistics

Kestrel Sportsman Weather Meter with Applied Ballistics

Prices accurate at time of writing

Bottom line: If you have the extra cash and want the hobby of learning to use a ballistics calculator, go for it!

If you’re a recreational shooter who wants a down and dirty solution to save ammunition when you hit the range, get a phone based solution and take good notes!

Best Ballistics Calculator Apps

KAC Bullet Flight

Knights armament is an American institution for the firearms industry. They make some of the finest precision, military grade, rifles and weapons that can be had.

In fact, they were one of the first companies to perfect the AR-10 with their KAC M110 – a rifle that is still in service with the military today.

KAC Bullet Flight
KAC Bullet Flight

They made this ballistic calculator app to help you dial in dope and get first round hits. It’s got a stripped-down version but is available in a detailed version, the Bullet Flight M, that is simply an excellent tool.

They factor in a ton of different data points and make it very easy to use the information when the time comes.

This application has the distinction of being one of the most counter-intuitive I’ve used.

The hardest thing to nail down about this application is working through the menus. however, once you get used to it, you can use it quickly – but it isn’t as fast as the other apps and definitely has a learning curve.

The trick to using this calculator is knowing what you need to get out of it and make sure you know what you’re doing when using that data. Trying to use the more advanced ballistic calculators like this one is a recipe for wasting ammo if you’re not used to working with the data.

Andriod | iOS

Nosler

Nosler pretty much owns the long-distance hunting industry. They were the first company to produce purpose-driven bullets and continue to innovate designs that eventually get copied later on by other companies.

Nosler Ballistics App
Nosler Ballistics App

This is their basic ballistic calculator application that does a good idea of getting you on target and helping you sight in your rifle.

It’s available for all smartphones and was intended to work well for their reloading manual as a way to predict trajectory when reloading, it works well for any bullets though.

The nice thing about this calculator is that it gets you on target with the least amount of fuss and confusion. It does an excellent job of just using the data you’re likely to have, and producing data you’re likely to use. It’s excellent for your first time figuring out a rifle, scope, and bullet combination.

This calculator is best for people who want a basic set of features and have access to accurate data about the load they’re shooting.

You can account for any factors other than velocity and ballistic coefficient, but for the majority of shooters and hunter shooting below 700 yards, this is plenty accurate and do a great deal of the work of zeroing for you.

Andriod | iOS

Shooter

The best thing about this calculator is the simplicity of the application. There are few screens and inputting data is easy because of it’s all done on a single screen.

The bad thing about this application is the use of scrolling menus that make you flip through each and every option before you reach the number you’re looking for.

Shooter Ballistic App
Shooter Ballistic App

This means a lot of tedious scrolling and setting up when you get to the range and need to make corrections in the field.

The only other complaint is the white background can be difficult to read on the screen, but you can overcome that. If you’re looking for the simplest complete calculator, this as good as it gets.

Andriod | iOS

Applied Ballistics

The Applied Ballistics mobile app is certainly my favorite ballistics calculator application for Android and iOS available.

Yes, it’s expensive, costing $30 but in my experience, no other ballistics calculator comes close to the functionality you get with this application.

Applied Ballistics App
Applied Ballistics App

By far the greatest feature of this calculator is the HUD display, meaning head-up display.

This is just a snapshot of all the information that the calculator displays in an Easy-to-Read format that cuts out everything you don’t need to read when it comes time to make the shot.

This makes it much faster to call Corrections with a spotter because you’re not bogged down with plucking out information from a table. It’s all multicolored and displayed for you in an easy-to-read format.

This feature alone makes it the best in the field, but this calculator is also by far the best designed to be used with a touchscreen. Most of the other calculator suffer from having too many buttons or forcing you to use a scrolling menu to input data into the calculator.

This calculator is much faster simply because it was designed around using a touch screen and not designed around traditional calculators where you press buttons.

It does however suffer and that you can’t use it well with gloves on, even with “touch compatible” gloves. If you need to shoot with gloves on getting convertible gloves that you can still use your trigger finger to work the calculator.

Andriod | iOS

iSnipe

This is one of the original ballistic calculators that was put onto the market for turning your smartphone or iPod touch into a ballistic computer. You can count on this as being one of the most refined, and detailed applications for ballistic calculators out there.

iSnipe generates data for bullet trajectories, based on data calculated for pitch, yaw, the wind, Coriolis effect, spin drift and atmospheric condition.

iSnipe App
iSnipe App

This is a very advanced calculator and the one I’d recommend for serious shooters and competitors that need a complete data set they can get their hands on.

It has a learning curve and you need to have a requisite level of understanding behind the math before you can quickly use this calculator but you can certainly learn it in an afternoon or two of shooting and read the instructions.

If you’re a nerd, you’ll love this calculator. If all you want is put holes in targets, get one of the simpler options that aren’t as in depth.

Only on iOS

A Few Quirks to Look Out For…

Battery Life

Make sure if you plan on using your phone as your calculator you factor in battery life. Especially if you plan on using a cell phone in your car as a GPS, music, or emergency contact device, make sure using your calculator at the range won’t result in you getting lost. Have a charger or extra battery back up at the ready so you don’t get left up a creek.

Consider Going Larger

My favorite way to display ballistics readout is to put the apps onto a tablet and prop it up so I can see and make notes while in the prone position. This is by far the easiest and most comfortable way to log and calculate data on your shots.

Full-Color Screen

Having full color can help you more easily read the screen. Especially is the resolution is low. On almost every application for iPhone and Android, you have full-color options, but most ballistic computers aren’t color.

Waterproof & Ruggedness

Make sure you know your equipment’s limitations. If it’s your phone, get a good case. If you bought a purpose made calculator, it’s probably decently rugged, but you’ll want to baby it a little bit and carry it in a case. As always, ziplock bags are your friends!

Where You Place your Calculator

A pro tip from someone who’s been there, if you have a muzzle brake on your rifle, don’t put your notebook and phone, and calculator up near the barrel of the rifle. You’re putting it in the blast zone!

Dad, his 50 Cal, my Tail Light
Don’t let this taillight be your phone!

Final Thoughts

When you head to the range with hard data about your file set up, good ammunition in your gun, and shiny new targets to lob rounds at, it’s a good day! Having a good dope is a perfect start and a ballistics calculator gives you a head start and ultimately saves time and money- as long as you know how to use them!

There’s a lot of good options on the market but here are the best on the market you can’t go wrong with if you trust them with your next competition.

Do you use a ballistic app? Record your dope on paper or on a tablet? Let us know in the comments!

The post Best Ballistic Calculator Apps for Your Smartphone appeared first on Pew Pew Tactical.

Posted in Ammo, Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , , , ,

May 15th, 2017 by asjstaff

Team Mathews swept the Men’s Open Pro Division and seized first and second place finishes in the Women’s Open Pro Division at the ASA Pro/Am in Appling, GA this past weekend.

 

Dan McCarthy took top honors in the Men’s Open Pro Division scoring an impressive 494 with a total of 17 twelve rings for the weekend. Teammates Levi Morgan finished two points behind McCarthy with 492 while Joseph Goza took home third with 488, respectively.

On the women’s side, Kailey Johnston, who claimed first at the last ASA shoot in Paris, TX, continued her hot streak with another first place finish in the Women’s Open Pro Division. Sharon Carpenter finished up in second after Sunday’s shoot down.

 

“Our team is firing on all cylinders,” stated Mathews Pro Staff Manager Derek Phillips. “It’s really fun and exciting to watch as we close in on the home stretch of this year’s season.”

 

ASA Pro Division competitors shoot two rounds of twenty targets from unmarked distances. These targets vary in distance up to 50 yards and the five highest scores from the first two rounds qualify for the shoot down to decide the winner. 

 

Follow Team Mathews through the remainder of the 2017 tournament season on Mathews Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

 

___________________________________________________________________________

 

About Mathews Archery.

Mathews Archery has been committed to elevating the archery experience for over 25 years. All Mathews bows are designed and built in Sparta, Wisconsin, U.S.A. and distributed through independent retailers around the world. Experience the full line of premier target and hunting bows at mathewsinc.com.

Posted in Industry News Tagged with: , , , ,

December 22nd, 2016 by asjstaff

There’s never been a better time to train new shooters.

STORY BY ROB REED • PHOTOS BY NATIONAL SHOOTING SPORTS FOUNDATION

As a shooter, there will likely be a time when someone asks, “Can you teach me to shoot?” If you aren’t used to working with new shooters, you might not know the best way to introduce them to the sport. With that in mind, here are some tips on how to provide newbies with a safe, fun and educational range trip.

Once you’ve scheduled the trip, let the new shooter know what to expect. Discuss how to dress for the range, and why they should avoid low-cut tops and open-toed shoes. The “hot brass dance” is never amusing to the one getting burned, and trying to clear trapped brass with a firearm in hand can be dangerous.

Review the standard safety rules ahead of time so they can process them in a calm, quiet environment. You’ll reinforce the rules later at the range. I prefer the NRA’s “Three Rules of Gun Safety” but “Cooper’s Four Rules” also work.

New shooters will model your behavior, so always set a good example.

New shooters will model your behavior, so always set a good example.

Explain the importance of using eye and ear protection at the range, and make sure you have enough of both on hand for everyone. Have the new shooters “double up” hearing protection by wearing foam earplugs underneath ear muffs. This will reduce anxiety caused by the noise of shooting.

It’s not enough to recite the rules. You have to go over how they work in context by explaining what a “safe direction” is at the range, how keeping the finger off the trigger helps prevent accidental discharges, when the gun should be loaded or unloaded on the line, and why these rules still apply even to “unloaded” guns.

You should also explain that “Cease fire” means “Stop shooting now!” and review other range commands if you’re using a supervised range.

Remember that the students will model their behavior off of the example you set, so make sure to follow the best safety practices yourself.

WHILE SHOOTING CAN BE a fun social activity, it’s easy to be overwhelmed if you are overseeing too many new shooters. If you are teaching by yourself, try to limit the trip to one or two newbies, if possible. Even then, work with them one-on-one and have the person not shooting observe so they can be better prepared for their turn.

If you have a friend assisting, you should be able to handle additional new shooters if you split them between you. Remember you are there for them, not for your own shooting practice, so focus on giving them the best possible range experience.

Also, whenever possible, split up relationship-paired couples among different mentors so each half of the couple focuses on what they are doing instead of trying to “help” the other.

A first trip to the range isn’t the same as a full NRA Basic Pistol class. Keep your instruction focused specifically on what they need to know to safely handle and shoot the firearm and hit the target. Leave the more technical stuff for later. Draw them a diagram of a sight picture and make sure they understand how the drawing corresponds to the front and rear sights on the firearm.

Any session at the range should begin and end with a focus on safety.

Any session at the range should begin and end with a focus on safety.

HAVE THEM PRACTICE HOLDING and dry firing the unloaded gun, and correct any problems with their grip or stance. Enforce the “trigger off the finger until the sights are on target” rule with dryfire so they’ll get in the habit. Avoid using the term “trigger squeeze” as it can cause new shooters to tighten their entire grip as they fire. Instead, explain that their grip should be firm and consistent the whole time, and that the trigger should be pulled
straight to the rear in a deliberate, smooth motion.

Since you’ll likely need to recock the firearm to reset the trigger during dry-fire, make sure they understand that once the gun is loaded it will automatically reload and recock itself when they shoot for real. (This is obviously not the case for manually operated firearms such as bolt- or lever-action rifles).

11263014The best firearm for new shooters is a .22LR, bar none. Whether it’s a rifle or pistol, the low recoil and relatively quiet report of the rimfire make it ideal as a first-time gun. If you don’t have a .22LR available, go for the lowest recoiling firearm you do have. For handguns, a full-size gun firing standard-pressure 9mm or .38 Special loads should be easy enough to manage. For rifles, a pistolcaliber carbine or a .223 AR are good choices. This goes double for ARs with adjustable stocks that can be resized for smaller statured shooters.

For aerial shotgun shooting use loads appropriate for the sport. If you are shooting stationary targets, use light loads or reduced recoil “tactical” loads. Whatever you do,
avoid the temptation to have a laugh at someone’s expense by giving them “too much gun.” It’s not fair to the new shooter, can turn them off the sport, and is actually unsafe.

The best targets are those that react to the hits. Nothing is more fun for new shooters than watching their targets explode, fall down, or spin around. Plate racks or portable swinging or spinning targets are good choices. Just make sure to keep to minimum safe distances when shooting steel.

You can also improvise with cans, plastic cups filled with water, clay birds set up down range, or anything else that is safe and doesn’t violate range rules. Even if you are limited to paper targets, many ranges will still allow you to tape small balloons to the targets or use the brightly colored Shoot-N-C targets.

Ensure that firearms are suitable to the new shooter’s size and age.

Ensure that firearms are suitable to the new shooter’s size and age.

Teaching kids to shoot provides challenges and rewards.

Teaching kids to shoot provides challenges and rewards.

TEACHING KIDS TO SHOOT has its own challenges and rewards. Some kids learn best from their parents, while others pay better attention to unrelated adults. If nothing else, a parent should always be present whenever a child is shooting. Make sure the firearms are suitable for the physical size of the child. I prefer using bolt-action or lever-action rifles over semiautos when working with kids so the shooter has to manually work the action to load the next round. Pay particular attention to their energy level, as their attention and safety consciousness can start to slip as they get tired. While it’s important to stay positive with any new shooter, that goes double for kids. Start and end critiques with positive statements and focus on the fun.

Now that you’ve learned some tips on taking new shooters to the range there is no better time to do so than right now. The NRA Mentor Program offers additional resources to help you promote the shooting sports by taking new shooters to the program. Whether you are a NRA member or not, you can help grow our sport by mentoring a new shooter.

For more information about the program, visit nrapublications.org/mentor. ASJ

A shooter’s first trip to the range should be safe, fun and educational.

A shooter’s first trip to the range should be safe, fun and educational.

Posted in Training Tagged with: , , , ,

October 28th, 2016 by asjstaff

Custom Metal Products today announced the newest release of their growing product line, the .22 Texas Star Target.

cmp-logo-2016-tight-300The Texas Star target features five 5″ diameter, 1/4″ thick AR500 steel targets mounted on the rotating arms of the wheel.

Shoot one of the targets off the arm and the wheel starts rotating. Try to keep up with the moving targets! As you hit each one the wheel may speed up, slow down or even reverse direction. Every shot is a new challenge.

The targets are easily replaced onto the arms by fitting the stem of the target into a socket on the back of the arm. Simply slide the target under the retaining spring and you’re ready to shoot again. The arms are mounted with Grade 8 hardened bolts for long life and impact resistance.

The legs and post simply slide into sockets on the base, so setup and transport is easy.
22-texas-star-500-clearOverall size:
56 w x 17 dp x 61 h
Shipping weight: 36 lbs
For .22 rimfire calibers only!

Pricing and Availability:
The .22 Texas Star is available now at www.custommetalprod.com. The price is set at $249 for the complete unit.

About Custom Metal Products
Custom Metal Products is a full line manufacturer of AR500 hardened steel shooting targets for
competition, recreational, law enforcement and military use. Our products include IDPA/IPSC,
Dueling Trees, Gongs, Swingers, Hostage, Sniper, and Cowboy Action Targets. See all of our
product details, including videos on our online store at www.CustomMetalProd.com

Contact
HR Eddens, President
Custom Metal Products, LLC
636-329-0142
hreddens@custommetalprod.com

Posted in Media Releases Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

October 6th, 2016 by asjstaff

On October 2nd, 2016, the Cowboy Fast Draw Association (CFDA) crowned their new World Champions. Approximately 250 competitors from across the U.S., Canada, and Europe traveled to Fallon, Nevada to compete in CFDA’s Signature Event, The Fastest Gun Alive – World Championship of Cowboy Fast Draw.

T.J. Vonfedlt a.k.a. Oregon Ranger, of Portland, OR, age 19, won his third Fastest Gun Alive – Men’s Overall World Championship by being the first repeat men’s champion in the sport’s history. He also made history in 2011 by winning the men’s overall championship at age, 14, which was covered by the Outdoor Channel’s, Shooting U.S.A. T.J. earned the Top Seed in the Magnificent 7 Finals in the regular rounds of the tournament and held off all challengers. He finally defeated last year’s Top Seed, Clay Janes a.k.a. Tin Bender of Caldwell, ID in the best 3 out of 5 final bout, with a time of .335, slightly over 1/3 of a second.

Jennifer Guerra a.k.a. Kiss-N-Tell, of Alta Loma, CA, won her first Fastest Gun Alive – Ladies’ Overall World Championship. She defeated the current Ladies National Champion Jamie Damrel a.k.a. Plain Jane of Vidor, TX in the final round with a .475, or just under ½ second. About 1/3 of CFDA’s members are women.

In the Youth Division, Michael Dobbins a.k.a. Blind Billy, of Powhatan, VA, defeated current National Youth Champion Jayden Eilrich a.k.a. Sheriff Rango of Fernley, NV with a final shot of .532.

In the Sport of Cowboy Fast Draw, authentic reproductions Colt .45 SAA six-guns are used with 1800’s period-correct leather holsters. Special wax bullet ammunition is used where the wax bullets are actually achieving the same velocity as live ammunition, but are stopped dead in their tracks by nothing more than archery netting. Digital electronic timers are used which illuminate LED start signals at the center of each target, from which the shooters react to their start light, draw, fire, and if their wax bullet strikes the target a time is recorded that is accurate to within 1/1000ths of a second. Firearms are never pointed at another person, instead the shooters stand side by side and face the 24 inch round-targets placed 24 feet downrange.

The format of the man vs man elimination tournament is managed by the CFDA Computer Scoring System, which draws the bouts and pairs the one on one match-ups by luck of the draw throughout the regular rounds of the tournament. In each round, the first of the two matched competitors to win 3 shots against their opponent wins that round and the defeated opponent receives an “X”, when a competitor receives 4-X’s they are eliminated from the tournament. Once the tournament is down to the Top 7 men, ladies, and youth on Saturday, they are seeded into a unique double-progressive elimination final format called, The Magnificent 7 Finals which begin at High Noon on Sunday, with hundreds of spectators cheering for their favorites.

Safety is always first! CFDA has a Youth Safety Training Program (begins at age 8) and a CFDA Range Officer Certification Program. One of the organization’s primary goals, “To educate as many people as possible in the safe and proper use of firearms.” CFDA is an NRA Affiliated Organization and has almost 5,000 members joining in the fun and thrill of the competition that is based upon, “The Romance and Legend of the Old West”. Members dress in western-themed clothing and adopt an alias which they compete under in the spirit of the old west. About 80 CFDA Affiliated Clubs exist coast to coast in the U.S. and are speading to Canada, Europe, Australia, and even Japan. CFDA was founded in Deadwood, SD and moved its annual world championship to Fallon, NV in 2008, and is sponsored by the Fallon Tourism & Convention Authority. Also among their major sponsors are Ruger Firearms, Pietta of Italy, Taylor’s & Co., and Mernickle Holsters.

For more information please go to: www.CowboyFastDraw.com or write to Cowboy Fast Draw Association – P.O. Box 5 – Fernley, NV 89408

Posted in Media Releases Tagged with: , , , ,

August 17th, 2016 by asjstaff

The American Military Continues To Influence Many Segments Of Society, And The Hunting Community Is No Exception

STORY AND PHOTOS BY SCOTT HAUGEN

For those who’ve attended or read about the SHOT Show for the past 15 years, you know exactly what I’m talking about when I say that the American military has had an increasing positive effect on the shooting sports, especially hunting. This welcome development is nothing short of phenomenal, and it becomes more evident with each passing year.

I make my living as a hunter, TV host, writer and speaker, so it’s been intriguing and inspiring to watch the influence of our country’s armed forces transition into every facet of the world I love so much. Take equipment, for example. Many hunters took their first deer with a government-issued .30-caliber rifle, one that may have been their dad’s or granddad’s. Today, the hunting rifle and optics world is dominated by military representation, and Trijicon scopes are a testimony to this.

It’s been more than 10 years since Trijicon entered the hunting world, and a television show I hosted was the first one they sponsored. I later went on to host and produce Trijicon’s The Hunt, which currently airs on Amazon Prime and in more than 40 countries. Even though Trijicon has become well known to hunters, not everyone is aware that the company had made quality riflescopes and sights for military and law enforcement use for more than 15 years.

Settling in for a long-range shot at a deer, Haugen (right) relied on a bipod, shooting bags and a specially designed tactical scope to make good on the 960yard shot. Having a spotter made the hunt even more “special forces” like, and brought a unique element to the total experience.

Guns are another example. Some old school hunters didn’t like it when ARs entered the hunting world, but as people became more educated on what ARs were, the literal translation of what an AR platform rifle is and how they worked, they quickly gained traction. First, predator, varmint and hog hunters used them, now they’re popular with many deer hunters.

Accessories that go with guns and hunting have also evolved, having been deeply rooted in America’s military history. Knives, flashlights, survival kits, boots, packs, navigation devices, even clothes, have stemmed from our military. Not long ago I was in Alaska’s Arctic with my son. For lunch one day we broke out some MREs, and although any current or former member of the military would know these as a field ration or “Meal, Ready to Eat,” it was something he’d never had. He’s 14 years old and loved it, and was intrigued when I shared stories of how this is what many military men and women survived on. MREs have come a long way, or so I’m told, but it’s just one more example of our military having an influence on hunting and the outdoors.

The very first rifle sling I had was one given to me from my grandfather, from when he served our country. It was an old leather sling with multiple holes for length adjustment. The sling was an inch wide and tough as nails, and it is still one of my favorites.

Predator hunters have greatly benefited from military influences. From ARs to dual-mounted optics, the end result has been more efficient hunts that help control predator populations.

Not only has military-designed gear had a visible impact on hunting, but on shooting form as well. For decades hunters went afield with their rifles, maybe a pack, but that was it. When it came time to take a shot, it was usually done standing, off-hand. If a tree was close, the hunter might try to lean on it to get steady. Or, if the grass wasn’t too high, the hunter might lay down in order to attain a stable shot.

Then bipods, shooting sticks and shooting bags made their way into the hunting world, thanks again to our military. Attaching a bipod to a rifle was something I’d never heard of or seen while growing up hunting in the 1960s and ’70s. Like all things “new,” they came
into the hunting world, but many hunters from previous generations wouldn’t use these shooting aids, which is unfortunate.

The author’s wife, Tiffany Haugen, connected on a one-shot kill on this pronghorn, thanks to shooting off a steady bipod from a prone position. For generations, hunters have benefited from what military personnel have shared with us, from gear to shooting form.

Last fall I was in deer camp in Wyoming. It was public ground and the sagebrush-studded hills were full of hunters. What amazed me was not the number of shots I heard during the first two days of the season, but how many people I talked to headed back to camp, transporting deer that had been shot in the leg, face, guts and everywhere bullets shouldn’t hit. None of them had used shooting aids.

One hunter in our camp, an older, retired man, missed nine shots at three different bucks. When I asked him why he doesn’t use a bipod or shooting stick, he replied, “Never have, don’t need one.” “No, obviously you do!” I insisted. I took him aside, showed him how to work my Bog Pod tripod shooting stick, and told him to take it. He killed a buck with his next shot.

Many of our armed forces pride themselves on shooting accuracy, and more and more hunters are starting to do the same. We owe it to ourselves, our fellow hunters and the animals we pursue to deliver quick, clean shots.

AR platforms, complete with specialized scopes, continue to grow in popularity among the hunting community. Here, an AR topped with Trijicon’s ACOG – a widely used scope in military and law enforcement circles – goes to work on a prairie dog town.

For people like me who make a living hunting, we can’t afford misses. Every miss costs time and money for everyone involved on the hunt, from myself to camera crews, outfitters, producers, editors and even networks. There’s pressure to hit the mark, which is why, for the past several years, all of my shots have come off a shooting stick, a bipod mounted to my gun, or shooting bags.

A couple seasons ago I took my first buck with a longrange rifle, what my dad and his friends, in their late 70s and 80s, refer to as a “sniper rifle.” Now, the gun wasn’t really a sniper rifle, but the $4,000 scope I had atop it was designed for snipers, and the sturdy bipod and shooting bags I relied on were used primarily by tactical shooters. I devoted many hours of practice to shooting that rifle from a prone position, learning about everything related to long-range shooting. I was able to connect on a nice buck at 960 yards while filming for a TV show.

Today, we see more hunters shooting from prone positions using shooting aids on television, in magazines, and on the Internet. Why? Because it’s more accurate, that’s why. Think about it. We wait all year for hunting season, then spend days, even weeks afield, and yet our success or failure often comes down to a single shot. It only makes sense to make that one shot as accurate as possible.

Many hunters who spend time in the dense deer woods, stalking with shotguns and open-sight rifles are now carrying their guns differently, thanks to the influence of the military and armed forces. Gone are the days when hunters trudged through thick brush, gun slung over their shoulder, and then quickly forcing it into a shaky shooting position when a buck pops up.

These days, guns are more frequently carried in a semi-shooting position, butt held above the shoulder, one hand on the stock, the other on the forestock. This allows a shot to be taken in a fraction of the time of the other hold, something that’s not only applicable in some deer hunting situations but when tracking dangerous game or wounded animals anywhere in the world.

Veteran Orlando Gill gets a congratulatory handshake from author Scott Haugen on his first bear. Orlando served in Afghanistan, where he lost a leg in action.

Last but not least, the discipline and hard work that our special forces are built on has entered the hunting world. Physical training and dedicated shooting practice has never been so prevalent, and our military is largely to thank.

I’ve never served in the military, but have many relatives and friends who have. My great uncle was a paratrooper who jumped on the beaches at Normandy and served on the front lines. I couldn’t get enough of his stories while growing up.

To the men and women who’ve served our country over the years, and continue to serve, I thank you. You help keep America free, and great. Your efforts and dedication
have prevailed in upholding our Constitution and Second Amendment rights, and for that, all hunters in the United States should thank you. Keep up the great work, and may God bless you and your families. ASJ

Editor’s note: Scott Haugen has been a full-time writer for 15 years. To see instructional videos on shooting, hunting and more, visit his new website, OutdoorsNow.com.

Posted in Hunting Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

July 20th, 2016 by asjstaff

Terry Raahauge 2nd Annual Memorial Shoot
In support of the American Cancer Society
Saturday July 30th & Sunday July 31st

Terry Raahauge lost his battle to cancer in 2013. He was a well-liked, fair, and honest man, and his family name is known by hunting and sporting clay enthusiasts all over the State of California.
We urge everyone to attend, even if you are not a shooter.
This shoot is NSCA registered, but non- registered shooters are encouraged to come and join the fun. Bring your family and friends to support the American Cancer Society in Terry’s memory.

This event is also a great tuneup for the upcoming dove season!
Saturday: (50 Target) Prelim, Sub Gauges -$40.00 ea. (fees Included)
Sunday: (100 Target) Main Event -$85.00 and Super Sporting- $40.00
(fees included)
Lunch catered by Pedi, delicious all you can eat Taco Bar (“Authentic Mexican Food”).
“Outdoor Gear” Raffle, sponsored by Kittles Outdoor Sports of Colusa.

RSVP REQUESTED by calling the club at 530-724-0552 or fill out the attached application and send to Raahauge’s P.O. Box 408 Dunnigan, CA. 95937. Please make checks out to Raahauge’s.
Donations for the raffle are welcomed. Attached is a tax deductable form you can fill out and send to us if you would like to make a donation of Goods or Cash.

Your Generous Donation is tax deductable. Thank you for supporting this much needed cause for a cure for Cancer. Proceeds go to the American Cancer Society.

MemorialShoot1 MemorialShoot2 MemorialShoot3

 

Raahauge’s Hunting and Sporting Clays

P.O. Box 408 Dunnigan, CA 95937

530-724-0552 / Fax: 530-724-0299

traahauge@yahoo.com / www.lincraahauges.com            

Posted in Events Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

June 24th, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

Let These Kids Take The Lead

Sydney Rockwell

Sydney Rockwell

Shyanne Roberts

Shyanne Roberts

Maddie Dalton-min

Maddie Dalton

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Cheyenne Dalton

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Moriah Combs

Vanessa Aquilar (4)-min

Vanessa Aguilar

                                                                           

 

  Story and photographs by Oleg Volk
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(Left to right) Shyanne Roberts, Cheyenne Dalton, Sydney Rockwell.

Most athletes start young to maximize their potential. Shooting sports are no exception, and an increasing number of competitive 3-gunners are starting out early. Learning to shoot used to be common for American kids, especially in rural areas, but actually training for performance with parents or professional coaches is a more recent phenomenon. As with musicians and gymnasts, starting marksmanship training early yields immeasurable benefits later on.
While attending the NRA Annual Meeting gathering in Nashville in April 2015, I was able to meet a group of such young shooters, along with their parents and supportive friends. We spent a day at a private range, shooting guns and photos. The six girls ranged in age from nine to 16, and every one of them demonstrated an unusual level of maturity. This was less surprising once you considered the degree of parental involvement with their education and activities.

Moriah crazyquail_3028hires-min

Moriah Combs completely relaxed on the range.

All of these young ladies impress the world with their breadth of interests and talents, which include everything from shooting sports and music to excellent academics and public speaking. They all have a degree of dedication and earnestness that they use to perfect their skills, and this drive, partly innate, partly imparted by closely involved family members, also caught the attention of industry sponsors who, in turn, have flocked to support these young shooters.

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Cheyenne Dalton and her proud Dad!

Watching them shoot reinforced the value of fitting guns to individual shooters. The adjustments to the length of pull, balance and grips to fit smaller hands and shorter limbs allow for the individual shooter to demonstrate their absolute best. Since most of these ladies are musicians, they also often use suppressors to safeguard their hearing.

For almost all of them, the parents were their first trainers. But most have gone beyond a single source of training. For example, Shyanne Roberts trained with Todd Jarrett, a world-renown competitive shooter and instructor.
Besides being an inspiration to other kids, these young ladies are a challenge to adult shooters. It’s one thing to be outshot by another experienced adult, but quite another to be shown up by a preteen. Watching their progress illustrates the value of quality training and also shows the rewards of dedication to learning and practicing new skills. Having excellent people skills, these juniors are ambassadors to the shooting sports and gun owners all over America. And last but far from the least, they prove that there’s much more to girls in shooting sports than pink pistol grips. ASJ


Vanessa Aguilar

Vanessa Aguilar, the youngest of this group that we interviewed, is also the youngest member of the San Antonio Sure Shots Pistol League. She shoots rimfire rifle and pistol, both customized for her. Despite a hearing impediment she’s been able to make TV and radio appearances, in addition to extensive training in preparation for IDPA and Steel Challenge competitions planned for next year.

Vanessa Aquilar (4)-min

Vanessa Aquilar (2)-min

Vanessa Aquilar (1)-min


Moriah Combs

Moriah Combs is the oldest of this group, and came to the shooting world through extensive involvement with her 4H club. Shooting since the age of six, she holds over 20 grand champion titles. She’s now a national 4-H Shooting Sports Teen Ambassador for Ohio, representing 3,000 youth shooters. Her other passions are photography, choir singing, hunting and running a cake-baking business.

Moriah-min

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Cheyenne Dalton

Cheyenne Dalton has been shooting since the age of five. She competes in the USPSA and NSSF Rimfire Challenge and holds a state championship title. She is planning on competing in 3-Gun competitions next. Outside of the range, she fishes with line and bow, hunts and plays numerous musical instruments with her band.

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Maddie Dalton

At 11, Maddie Dalton sings and plays musical instruments when she isn’t winning the youth title in the Limited category of the 2014 NSSF Rimfire World Championship. That’s pretty amazing progress for someone who had only shot their first gun a year prior. She’s a two-time winner of the Oklahoma junior fiddle championship as well. How is that for talent?

Maddie Dalton-min

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 Shyanne Roberts

COVER Shyanne roberts (2)-minShyanne Roberts has already participated in 3-Gun, IDPA, USPSA, action rifle and steel silhouette events. She also makes frequent TV appearances, making a strong and well-articulated case for gun ownership as part of our individual freedoms. Shooting is just one of her many passions – academics, music and other sports round out her personal development. In addition to rifles, rimfire and centerfire pistols, Shyanne also runs a 12-gauge shotgun quite effectively – even though it’s taller than she is!

Editor’s note – The American Shooting Journal’s Patriotic July 2015 issue features Shyanne Roberts on the cover. Look for copies nationwide!

American Shooting Journal July Cover

 

Shyanne Roberts 2-min


Sydney Rockwell

Sydney Rockwell is a 14-year-old competitive shooter who began shooting rifles with her dad at age nine. Serving as the vice president of her school’s student council, Sydney is also an avid hunter, golfer and competitor in several action-shooting sports, including Steel Challenge, 3-Gun, IDPA and USPSA competitions. This past October she was selected for the prestigious US Army Marksmanship Unit’s Junior Shooters’ Clinic, and received training from some of the most elite competitive shooters in the world.

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Sydney Rockwell 2 -min
Back to the TOP


Editor’s note: Oleg Volk is a professional photographer specializing in the shooting industry around the nation. Feel free to contact him at olegvolk.net.

Author’s note: A big thank you to Eric Saperstein for the introduction to this awesome crew.

Posted in Shooters Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 12th, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

These GRITS Girls Are Southern Alright – Girls R  eally Into Shooting

Story and Photographs by Dana farrell


Shotguns
come in a variety of types – single shot, pump action, autoloading, side by side and over and under. There is a diehard group of shotgun shooters and collectors who consider a side by side the only style truly worth their time, and nowhere in the United States can you find more of these male and female side-by-side aficionados in one place than the Spring Southern Side by Side Championship and Exhibition, held each year at the Deep River Sporting Clays and Shooting School outside the central North Carolina town of Sanford.

PHOTO 4 IMG_4180 Marilyn Mcllvain calling for a bird on the clay course

Marilyn Mcllvain calling for a bird on the clay course.

IMG_4258 Judy and Bob Holiday looking Dapper in their attire

Bob and Judy Holiday in their period attire. A lot of folks have a great time going “all in” during these shoots.

The shooting rules are casual, with the only stipulation being that all guns shot on the sporting-clays course must have horizontally aligned barrels. This is more of an exhibition, so although some shooters take their shooting very seriously, posting a good score is secondary for many, with camaraderie and a chance to rub elbows with fellow side-by-side enthusiasts being the true main attraction. It’s called a championship, but that’s just for bragging rights – there’s no purse, there’s no betting, and there are so many trophy categories that it’s almost like a kid’s soccer club.

More Women Taking Up the Sport
PHOTO 3 IMG_4341 Judy Holiday Ella Lanier and Elizabeth lanier

Judy Holiday, Ella Lanier and Elizabeth Lanier.

One of the more notable changes at the Spring Southern over recent years has been the influx of lady shooters. They’re not just attendees either, but actual competitors. Groups such as Girls Really Into Shooting have led the way for more women to get involved.

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Bill Kempffer,
owner of the Deep River shooting school, says he’s seen a steady uptick in the number of women shooters over the years. Kempffer serves on the National Shooting Sports Foundation Board of Governors and has been in the shooting sports business since the 1950s – certainly long enough to notice any trends in the industry. “I’ve seen big changes – particularly in the last 20 years, and Deep River has been around for 27 years,” he says. “In the beginning you’d occasionally have a wife or a daughter come out to shoot, but around 15 years ago we had an increase in single mothers who would bring their sons to the range to be around men and learn masculine things, because that’s what their fathers and brothers did. In the last five to 10 years more women have stepped out and started doing it themselves.”

ENTER Elizabeth Lanier, G.R.I.T.S. Founder
PHOTO 2 Elizabeth Lanier Founder of GRITS

Elizabeth Lanier, Founder of G.R.I.T.S. Girls Really Into Shooting.

Elizabeth Lanier didn’t shoot much as a child growing up in Texas, but you wouldn’t know it by the way she handles her shotgun on the clays course. On her call of “pull,” two orange targets are launched and instantly turned to dust by her 12-gauge side by side. Liz’s childhood experience with guns was limited to 4th of July celebrations when the men in her family would set up a few soda bottles for the youngsters to shoot with .22 rimfires. Several years back she bought her then-husband a set of five shooting lessons, tagging along with him for the first outing. She discovered she liked shooting so much that she used the remaining four lessons on herself. “I thought it was great therapy; it was something I could go out and do that was just about me, the shotgun and the target. I used to drive my kids up to the five-stand and leave the car running, air conditioning on and a movie playing. They were all in car seats and I’d take an hour lesson, go back to the car and they’d all be sound asleep. It was wonderful fun,” she said.

IMG_4109 Kate Ross to Sue Ross

Kate and Sue Ross.

IMG_4219 Bugsy Graves with two smiling competitors

A happy shooter with Mr. Bugsy Graves

As things progressed, Lanier figured she needed to learn more so she could help the group become more proficient. She got her National Sporting Clays Association level I certification, and then her level II. The only woman in a class of nine, she was so full of nervous excitement that she literally cried when she was awarded her certification. One thing led to another, and people started coming to her for instruction, but she says money has never been the object – it’s the love of the sport that drives her. Her sights were then squarely set on her level III certification, which she considered the ultimate goal – one that would place her in a select group of women so few you can count them on one hand. Lanier calls the day she obtained her level III certification one of her proudest moments. After weathering her divorce, instructing morphed into a career that not only offsets the cost of her hobbies, but ultimately ended up supporting her and her kids.

IMG_4137 Mimi Wingfield shoots at Rabbit target

Mimi Wingfield ready for the rabbit target.

“It doesn’t matter where you come from, how much money you have, what you do for a living – we’re all together to have fun, to enjoy being outside and shooting,” says Lanier. “People would see us out shooting and think, ‘Oh, my, those ladies are having a good time!’”

Judy Hughes Lady Champion in main event

Judy Hughes – Lady Champion in the main event.

With five chapters and two more currently in the works, GRITS is spreading the word that women and shotguns are a good combination You’ll know GRITS girls at clay competitions. They’re the ladies smiling and slapping high-fives while shooting the course. It’s the love of the sport that keeps them and their side-by-side shotguns coming back for more. ASJ

 










Posted in Shotgun Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

May 20th, 2015 by Danielle Breteau
PHOTO 1 Kenda ROCKIN it

Cutting hard around a corner, empty real estate appears between Kenda Lenseigne and mother earth. She floats in midair, held into her stirrups solely by the G-forces in the turn. Like a motorcycle rider leaning into a corner, she banks hard in order to explode out the other side of the barrel to fire at the next target.

 

Story by Robin Taylor

Photographs by David Mechin,  Douglas Smith, Kristen Daulton and J2 Photography

All the shooting sports have unusual athletes. Call them champions, or even stars. Among the stars you find greats that do more than win. They change the sport. Kenda Lenseigne grew beyond star status some time ago, becoming part of the cultural bedrock of mounted shooting. In the course of winning multiple titles on the national and world stage, Lenseigne transformed the guns, the gear, even the saddles used by the current generation of riders/shooters.
PHOTO _MG_8614

(KRISTEN DAULTON)

“If you had asked me 16 years ago if I thought I could do this full time I wouldn’t have said yes,” says Lenseigne. “Who would have known work would be something you love so much?”

Today Lenseigne is both “making a living” and “living a message” of responsible firearm use that opens doors worldwide. As a trainer, shooter, rider, and ambassador for the shooting sports there is a lot to be said for Kenda Lenseigne.

I caught up with Lenseigne at her New River, Ariz., home, freshly returned from an American Quarter Horse Association (AQHA) night event in Scottsdale (the Sun Circuit Championship). Like most people, I’d always assumed that mounted shooting was primarily regulated by the Single Action Shooting Society (SASS) – the major governing body for cowboy-style events. Not true!

 

KL-DS-Wysiwyg-Photography-2706

Physical conditioning and plain old toughness play a role in mounted shooting, as the risk of falling is ever-present. “There’s a saying in the horse world that says ‘green horse, green rider usually equals black and blue.’” Lenseigne explained that “even if someone is a great rider in other disciplines, the scenario changes when you start to shoot off of a horse for the first time.”

Mounted shooters and SASS “ground shooters” have very different needs, and when Lenseigne started shooting in 1998, the Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association (CMSA) had just branched out from SASS. Since then, the two organizations have followed different roads. The most visible difference being CMSA’s decision to eliminate SASS’ long-standing costume requirements.

“Dropping the costume requirement changed everything,” says Lenseigne. “That one decision opened up the sport to the broader riding world,” says Lenseigne. “Suddenly we had better horses, better riders, and it became a lot less expensive to participate.”

Sponsors like Wrangler took an interest, and people started taking “mounted” seriously. The result was a modern rodeo sport akin to barrel racing – with guns. Horse and rider charge through a rodeo-corral-sized course of fire, circling around and through a proscribed pattern of plastic barrels at maximum speed. At intervals, the rider breaks target balloons using a blank-firing single-action revolver. With as many as 10 balloons in play, the shooter must switch from one pistol to another at full gallop. It happens fast, and at Lenseigne’s level, if you miss one balloon, you lose.

PHOTO 4 long stretch

Now that the American Quarter Horse Association recognizes mounted shooting as an official event and the growth of the sport overseas, the future for mounted shooting appears very bright. (J2 PHOTOGRAPHY)

“If you are too far away, the black powder granules burn up before hitting the target, and if you’re too close, once in a while the pattern will have a hole in the middle. The balloon will literally just wave at you. It’s happened to me several times.” Lenseigne continued, “You have to trust yourself to hold off a little bit. If you relate it to bird hunting, you want to wait for the bird to be at an optimum distance. Shooting it too soon leads to a bad result, and so does waiting too long.”

PHOTO _J2P9663

(J2 PHOTOGRAPHY)

Flying through an agility course atop a galloping charger isn’t “normal” horseback
riding. Barrel racers aren’t quite as crazy as, say, rodeo bull riders, but the pictures with this article show a little bit of what Lenseigne’s horses can do. I mentioned to Lenseigne that my aunt was a barrel racer, and she shot back with “Then, she’s crazy like us!”

International Growth

This year Lenseigne made her fourth trip to France to serve as an ambassador/trainer for the growing community of Western shooting enthusiasts there. European mounted fans are overcoming some gun-control requirements – using cap-and-ball revolvers if they have to – in order to shoot from horseback.

The following year, Lenseigne was asked to teach a clinic – and France had eased its gun restrictions so she was able to use a revolver. “People started showing up with all manner of crazy stuff. They were just so happy to be there, it was infectious,” she says. “Last year, even more showed up, some with modified .357 revolvers.”

KENDA TOC PHOTOSome European riders are bringing their dream to learn all there is to know about the mounted shooting and cowboy lifestyle all the way to the United States just to compete.

New Sport New Gear

Back in the late 1990s, Lenseigne and her fellow riders had no gear that really worked for mounted-action shooting. Some things could be adapted (barrel racing saddles, for example), but most of the “gun stuff” was just wrong. Imagine trying to re-holster a SAA (single-action Army Colt revolver or Peacemaker) one-handed while using a period-correct “slim jim” holster (a holster with a very narrow girth) at full gallop. It’s not quite like threading a needle, but you get the idea.

“We had people walking around with water bottles stuffed in their holsters to get them to stay open,” says Lenseigne. “I was one of them!”

The problem became an opportunity when Lenseigne met Safariland’s Scott Carnahan at the NRA’s Bianchi Cup in Colombia, Mo. The holster innovations that practical shooters like Carnahan take for granted – low-cut fronts for faster draws, laminated holster materials, adjustable draw tension – all that was unknown to the mounted community.

Carnahan connected Lenseigne with his design staff, and their Bianchi Cowboy line has offered Kenda Lenseigne signature holsters ever since. Lenseigne’s line takes advantage of the technology that Safariland is known for, but holds the standard of a traditional look and feel. “It’s like an old model car with a new engine.”

PHOTO 5 Painted horse

The Cowboy Mounted Shooting Association branched off from the Single Action Shooting Society in the 1990s and has since become its own regulated event series. CMSA does not have costume requirements like SASS, and many feel this is the aspect that helped the sport to grow even faster.

“When you look at the products I’ve been involved in developing, people essentially are benefiting from my decade of learning the hard way,” laughed Lenseigne. As she explained, it’s difficult to shoot a standard Peacemaker well right out of the box due to the stiff hammer action. Competitive shooters immediately lighten the hammers. “When I first started in the sport, I had heard about the legendary Bob Munden who was the go-to gunsmith, so I sent him my guns. When I got them back, $300 per gun later, I had hair triggers – which is absolutely not what you want for mounted shooting.” Once Lenseigne found the right gunsmiths, her mounted guns began to evolve. “The original hammer spur on the old Peacemaker tends to open your grip when you’re shooting one-handed,” Lenseigne explained. “So, we took that hammer spur and made it lower and wider for quicker access.” Today, Uberti firearms offers the Kenda Lenseigne signature line as a package “racegun” for mounted shooting. They sell well to mounted shooters, and to “ground shooters” who compete in SASS events.

The Mountain Comes to Mohammed

Certain brands have become household words among horse people in the US. One of the largest is Circle Y Saddles.

“In January of ‘09, Circle Y contacted me to design a saddle for them, saying ‘We want to be the first in the industry that builds a saddle specifically for your sport.’” Lenseigne was shocked. What an honor! “This is the saddle brand that practically everybody grew up riding, or at least wanting to ride. Basically, if you own a horse, you know Circle Y.”

Lenseigne had ridden many different disciplines over the years, so she had a lot to say.

PHOTO 3 Kenda Lenseigne Shooting

Like miniature shotguns, Lenseigne’s blank-firing pistols throw a “pattern” of burning black-powder granules to break the balloon, but those granules burn up at a distance of just 20 feet. Optimally, the rider wants to engage at 8 to 10 feet.

“They sent out their designer to visit with me, and we sat down with a yellow pad. We sketched out what I thought would be a good design for the sport: a forward-tilted horn to allow clearance for your gun leather, free-moving stirrups, and a deep seat to hold you in.” A contract to ride for Circle Y developed, and things got very serious. “They hand-delivered the prototype to one of the CMSA majors in Arizona. They put it on my horse, did a photo shoot, and then gave me the option to ride it in the upcoming event, or ride my regular saddle.” As any sponsored competitor knows, running brand-new gear at an important match invites disaster. If it works, you’re a hero. If it fails you damage yourself and the brand. It’s a high-stakes “hero or zero” gamble.

“I warmed up my horse in the saddle for about 45 minutes, liked it, and decided the time was right to believe in my design and go for it.” Lenseigne set the world record on her first pass, and her saddle design went “hero” instantly. “The design was a hit from day one; we’ve only made some minor changes since then – different grades of leather, etc.,” she says. Not every project has worked out so well, but as she’ll tell you “you can’t excel unless you fail a time or two and learn from your experiences.”

The Life

PHOTO 6 Kenda walking with horse

“(Kenda’s) had an amazing impact on the mounted shooting world,” says Ken Amorosano, former publisher of Western Shooting Horse, and current publisher of Cowgirl and True West. “She became a role model for hundreds of girls that wanted to be just like her, and she’s never let them down.” (KRISTEN DAULTON)

Lenseigne’s life involves many pieces. She describes herself as “horse-heavy at the moment” with six of her own quarter horses in varying stages of training, plus several more that she’s training for customers. As you might imagine, training a horse to deal with a gunshot fired near its head isn’t easy, and would-be competitive riders are more than willing to pay her for her help. Lenseigne’s involved with every piece of the puzzle, firing .22 blanks from horseback on her home range, and taking horses to the Ben Avery Shooting Complex to shoot the louder .45s.

“For me the most important thing is building the horse’s confidence to accept the noise of gunfire. People send their horses to me for that.”

Once she gets the horse settled in, she insists on spending time training the rider. “I can train the horse and he’ll be ready to go, but if the rider doesn’t know what buttons to push, that won’t work for either of us.”

Lenseigne explained that even a moderately experienced rider can accidentally send the horse mixed signals – especially with all the distractions created by adding guns and rapid balance shifts to the equation.

“Had I not been an experienced rider, I certainly would have hit the ground more times than I can count,” says Lenseigne. In the Internet age, Lenseigne’s an irony in motion. She’s competing, training, designing, traveling the world, and doing media appearances – all because of her skill with a horse and a gun. ASJ

Editor’s note:

David Mechin is a French photographer whose ability to capture Kenda Lenseigne in these images portrays his passion for his field and depiction of beauty, power and dynamism. See more of his work at davidmechin.com.

Douglas Smith  See more of his work at wysiwyg-photography.smugmug.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Women and guns Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,