August 17th, 2016 by Sam Morstan

The American Military Continues To Influence Many Segments Of Society, And The Hunting Community Is No Exception

STORY AND PHOTOS BY SCOTT HAUGEN

For those who’ve attended or read about the SHOT Show for the past 15 years, you know exactly what I’m talking about when I say that the American military has had an increasing positive effect on the shooting sports, especially hunting. This welcome development is nothing short of phenomenal, and it becomes more evident with each passing year.

I make my living as a hunter, TV host, writer and speaker, so it’s been intriguing and inspiring to watch the influence of our country’s armed forces transition into every facet of the world I love so much. Take equipment, for example. Many hunters took their first deer with a government-issued .30-caliber rifle, one that may have been their dad’s or granddad’s. Today, the hunting rifle and optics world is dominated by military representation, and Trijicon scopes are a testimony to this.

It’s been more than 10 years since Trijicon entered the hunting world, and a television show I hosted was the first one they sponsored. I later went on to host and produce Trijicon’s The Hunt, which currently airs on Amazon Prime and in more than 40 countries. Even though Trijicon has become well known to hunters, not everyone is aware that the company had made quality riflescopes and sights for military and law enforcement use for more than 15 years.

Settling in for a long-range shot at a deer, Haugen (right) relied on a bipod, shooting bags and a specially designed tactical scope to make good on the 960yard shot. Having a spotter made the hunt even more “special forces” like, and brought a unique element to the total experience.

Guns are another example. Some old school hunters didn’t like it when ARs entered the hunting world, but as people became more educated on what ARs were, the literal translation of what an AR platform rifle is and how they worked, they quickly gained traction. First, predator, varmint and hog hunters used them, now they’re popular with many deer hunters.

Accessories that go with guns and hunting have also evolved, having been deeply rooted in America’s military history. Knives, flashlights, survival kits, boots, packs, navigation devices, even clothes, have stemmed from our military. Not long ago I was in Alaska’s Arctic with my son. For lunch one day we broke out some MREs, and although any current or former member of the military would know these as a field ration or “Meal, Ready to Eat,” it was something he’d never had. He’s 14 years old and loved it, and was intrigued when I shared stories of how this is what many military men and women survived on. MREs have come a long way, or so I’m told, but it’s just one more example of our military having an influence on hunting and the outdoors.

The very first rifle sling I had was one given to me from my grandfather, from when he served our country. It was an old leather sling with multiple holes for length adjustment. The sling was an inch wide and tough as nails, and it is still one of my favorites.

Predator hunters have greatly benefited from military influences. From ARs to dual-mounted optics, the end result has been more efficient hunts that help control predator populations.

Not only has military-designed gear had a visible impact on hunting, but on shooting form as well. For decades hunters went afield with their rifles, maybe a pack, but that was it. When it came time to take a shot, it was usually done standing, off-hand. If a tree was close, the hunter might try to lean on it to get steady. Or, if the grass wasn’t too high, the hunter might lay down in order to attain a stable shot.

Then bipods, shooting sticks and shooting bags made their way into the hunting world, thanks again to our military. Attaching a bipod to a rifle was something I’d never heard of or seen while growing up hunting in the 1960s and ’70s. Like all things “new,” they came
into the hunting world, but many hunters from previous generations wouldn’t use these shooting aids, which is unfortunate.

The author’s wife, Tiffany Haugen, connected on a one-shot kill on this pronghorn, thanks to shooting off a steady bipod from a prone position. For generations, hunters have benefited from what military personnel have shared with us, from gear to shooting form.

Last fall I was in deer camp in Wyoming. It was public ground and the sagebrush-studded hills were full of hunters. What amazed me was not the number of shots I heard during the first two days of the season, but how many people I talked to headed back to camp, transporting deer that had been shot in the leg, face, guts and everywhere bullets shouldn’t hit. None of them had used shooting aids.

One hunter in our camp, an older, retired man, missed nine shots at three different bucks. When I asked him why he doesn’t use a bipod or shooting stick, he replied, “Never have, don’t need one.” “No, obviously you do!” I insisted. I took him aside, showed him how to work my Bog Pod tripod shooting stick, and told him to take it. He killed a buck with his next shot.

Many of our armed forces pride themselves on shooting accuracy, and more and more hunters are starting to do the same. We owe it to ourselves, our fellow hunters and the animals we pursue to deliver quick, clean shots.

AR platforms, complete with specialized scopes, continue to grow in popularity among the hunting community. Here, an AR topped with Trijicon’s ACOG – a widely used scope in military and law enforcement circles – goes to work on a prairie dog town.

For people like me who make a living hunting, we can’t afford misses. Every miss costs time and money for everyone involved on the hunt, from myself to camera crews, outfitters, producers, editors and even networks. There’s pressure to hit the mark, which is why, for the past several years, all of my shots have come off a shooting stick, a bipod mounted to my gun, or shooting bags.

A couple seasons ago I took my first buck with a longrange rifle, what my dad and his friends, in their late 70s and 80s, refer to as a “sniper rifle.” Now, the gun wasn’t really a sniper rifle, but the $4,000 scope I had atop it was designed for snipers, and the sturdy bipod and shooting bags I relied on were used primarily by tactical shooters. I devoted many hours of practice to shooting that rifle from a prone position, learning about everything related to long-range shooting. I was able to connect on a nice buck at 960 yards while filming for a TV show.

Today, we see more hunters shooting from prone positions using shooting aids on television, in magazines, and on the Internet. Why? Because it’s more accurate, that’s why. Think about it. We wait all year for hunting season, then spend days, even weeks afield, and yet our success or failure often comes down to a single shot. It only makes sense to make that one shot as accurate as possible.

Many hunters who spend time in the dense deer woods, stalking with shotguns and open-sight rifles are now carrying their guns differently, thanks to the influence of the military and armed forces. Gone are the days when hunters trudged through thick brush, gun slung over their shoulder, and then quickly forcing it into a shaky shooting position when a buck pops up.

These days, guns are more frequently carried in a semi-shooting position, butt held above the shoulder, one hand on the stock, the other on the forestock. This allows a shot to be taken in a fraction of the time of the other hold, something that’s not only applicable in some deer hunting situations but when tracking dangerous game or wounded animals anywhere in the world.

Veteran Orlando Gill gets a congratulatory handshake from author Scott Haugen on his first bear. Orlando served in Afghanistan, where he lost a leg in action.

Last but not least, the discipline and hard work that our special forces are built on has entered the hunting world. Physical training and dedicated shooting practice has never been so prevalent, and our military is largely to thank.

I’ve never served in the military, but have many relatives and friends who have. My great uncle was a paratrooper who jumped on the beaches at Normandy and served on the front lines. I couldn’t get enough of his stories while growing up.

To the men and women who’ve served our country over the years, and continue to serve, I thank you. You help keep America free, and great. Your efforts and dedication
have prevailed in upholding our Constitution and Second Amendment rights, and for that, all hunters in the United States should thank you. Keep up the great work, and may God bless you and your families. ASJ

Editor’s note: Scott Haugen has been a full-time writer for 15 years. To see instructional videos on shooting, hunting and more, visit his new website, OutdoorsNow.com.

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