February 15th, 2017 by Sam Morstan
Scott Lee developed and manufactured numerous products that changed muzzleloading to include Bore Butter, Wonder Lube 1000 PLUS, Natural Lube, EZ Clean, Wonder Patches, Wonder Wads, Remington Wonder Lube and many more.

SEAL 1 Muzzleloader CLP PLUS is the next generation of products that will clean, lube and protect your muzzleloader.

The paste works as a great patch and bullet lube.

It is time to go to the next step use SEAL 1 Muzzleloader CLP PLUS for all your muzzleloading needs.

Muzzleloader CLP PLUS Benefits:

  • More rounds between cleaning
  • Increase Accuracy
  • Increase Muzzle Velocity
  • Decrease Standard Deviation
  • BioBased Non-Toxic
  • Works with all powders and pellets
  • Made in the USA
  • Clean Lube and Protect in one easy step
  • SEAL 1 never sells direct to your customer all sales go through dealers or distributors

MLP-4  4 oz Jar  Dealer $6.33 Retail $10.49

 MLA-6 Aerosol 6 oz. Can  Dealer $13.78 Retail $22.75

Posted in Industry News Tagged with: , , ,

December 14th, 2016 by Sam Morstan

Flintlock Construction Inc. offers quality muzzleloading barrels in a variety of calibers, lengths, twists and tapers.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY MIKE NESBITT

I recently purchased a .52-caliber barrel from Charles Burton of Flintlock Construction Inc. (FCI) in northeast Kentucky, and I’m happy to report that it now has a new rifle wrapped around it and is performing very well.

My shooting was done using a .512-inch-diameter round ball wrapped in a .015-inch patch. The bore is tapered – just a mere .003 inch within the 35-inch length – but it is easily felt both when loading a patched round ball and when cleaning the gun. That ball-and-patch combination is relatively easy to start at the muzzle, and ramming the patched ball down to rest on the powder actually gets easier as the ball is pushed further down the
bore. At least part of the reason for that is because the tapered bores have their tightest diameters at their muzzles.

These barrels can be straight octagon up to 1 3/8 inches in width for any length out to 48 inches. FCI also offers straight tapered barrels to those same dimensions. Swamped, octagon and round barrels are also available out to 48 inches as well. Smoothbore barrels are made out to 48 inches. Burton also makes a 1 1/8-inch light bench barrel with a false muzzle, and pistol barrels too.

This Leman-styled rifle was built using the new .52-caliber Burton barrel from FCI.

This Leman-styled rifle was built using the new .52-caliber Burton barrel from FCI.

Burton’s barrels are made from 12L14 steel, and several calibers are standard. These include bore sizes of .30, .32, .36, .38, .40, .44, .45, .47, .48, .50, .52, .54, .58, .60 and .62 calibers. What drew my attention to his barrels is his offering of the .52 caliber, and that is what I ordered: a 35-inch barrel that is 1 inch wide with a twist rate of one turn in 66 inches, and having flat bottom grooves. All barrels come with a straight or tapered tang breech plugs and the rifling is cut with seven grooves. Twist rates can be from one turn in 21 inches to straight rifled, so the buyer has the choice of just about any rate of twist desired.

SQUARE-BOTTOM RIFLING GROOVES are cut to a depth of .010 to .012 inch, while round bottom grooves are cut to .015 to .016 inch. All rifled barrels have seven grooves, and typical twists are 1 in 48, 1 in 57, 1 in 66, and 1 in 72 inches. But by using a sine bar rifling machine, Burton can cut twists from straight to as fast as one turn in 21 inches.

In addition, he hand laps and shoots all custom barrels before shipping them. My .52-caliber barrel came with a test target that was fired from sandbags at 30 yards with 70 grains of FFFg under a patched .512-inch round ball. In order to shoot the new barrels, Burton temporarily breeches them to an in-line “action” and glues sights to the barrel. All evidence of the sights and the breeching are removed before the barrel receives the breech plug the customer has requested.

When it was time to sight-in my new rifle the day was wet and rainy, but I just wore my hat with the “Montana peak” and went shooting. For the initial shots, I posted a target at 25 yards and filed down the front sight to raise the point of impact on the target. The load used for these close-range tests was 50 grains of GOEX FFFg under the .512inch cast ball wrapped in a Bridgers Best .015-inch lubricated patch.

All five shots cut the X on this second target.

All five shots cut the X on this second target.

With the sight filed so the rifle was hitting center, I posted a pistol target for a five-shot group, and this turned out very well indeed. Those five shots, by the way, were fired using the Pushing Daisies patches from October Country, cut from .015-inch ticking and lubed with Bumblin’ Bear Grease. Both are very good patches, especially for hunting. In case you are wondering, I consider both Bridgers Best and October Country patches to be equally good.

All things considered, the Burton barrel with the tapered bore loads easily and shoots very well. The small amount of shooting I’ve done with this rifle probably hasn’t done the barrel any real harm, but more shooting will certainly be done – and sooner than later.

Prices for Burton Barrels vary, but all are very reasonable, starting at $185 for a breeched straight rifle barrel, such as mine. Prices do not include shipping, and Burton asks for 50 percent of the barrel’s cost when an order is placed, with the remainder due when the barrel is received. Delivery is generally made in three to six months, as no barrels are kept in stock. All barrels are for black powder only.

To learn more about Burton gun barrels, or to place an order, visit fcibarrels.com, or call (606) 780-7709. ASJ

The author sights in his new .52-caliber FCI barrel from the bench.

The author sights in his new .52-caliber FCI barrel from the bench.

Posted in Black Powder Tagged with: , , , ,

May 25th, 2016 by Sam Morstan

Part II of III – Loading And Safety

STORY AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY BOB SHELL

We began this three-part series on blackpowder last issue, where we covered its invention, refinement and today’s four grades – five, counting a special Swiss version.
This issue we turn to loading the powder and safety, and wrap up next month with tricks of the trade.
There are a few things that you should be aware of to get best results. First, always make sure your gun is empty. If you buy a new muzzleloader, then you can put a rod down the barrel and mark the rod to establish the depth that indicates an empty barrel. When preparing to load a used muzzleloader, remove the nipple where the percussion cap would be placed, and make sure you can see clearly through to the inside of the barrel. If it is blocked, the gun won’t fire, and the only thing you will get is a small pop from the cap.
A method often used to clear or establish a clear nipple channel is by firing a couple of caps without any powder in the barrel. Simply place a piece of paper or something light on your bench, and then aim the end of your barrel at the object and fire. The piece of paper should move when your channel is clear because the percussion cap alone is enough to cause a tuft of air. Once you have established that, you have a clear barrel and you are ready to load.

Muzzleloaders come in all sorts of varieties, calibers, styles and ignition systems. The one thing they have in common is the way they are loaded, hence the name. Fifty-caliber Lyman caplock (top left), .50- caliber Lyman flintlock (bottom left) and an original pair of 1837 French military caplock pistols (below, right).

PATCHING
When loading a round ball, a patch must be used in order for the ball to be accurate and prevent blow by, which would rob the shooter of power and accuracy. You can buy precut patches or experiment with your own. An old sheet makes good patch material because it is both tough and consistent in thickness. The patch should be placed on the muzzle, then the ball seated on top of it. It should have some resistance to seating but not an excessive amount, as you might end up with a ball stuck halfway down the barrel. There are signs that help to indicate if you are using the proper amount of patching. You can usually find the fired patches on the ground, especially if you are shooting a number of rounds. If the patch shows rifling marks without excessive tearing, then it is probably the right size. If there are no markings from the rifling, then this might indicate that the patch should be a little larger. If you do get a bullet stuck in the barrel, you can pull it out with a bullet-removing screw.
However, this can be quite a chore.

BALL LOADING
You should always use a measuring device to pour the powder into the barrel – never do it from a flask containing a large amount of powder. If there is a live spark from a previous firing, this will cause an explosion. Pouring a small amount of powder down the barrel will help minimize the harm if there still happens to be a smoldering cinder. This does happen – to the careless! There are adjustable measures made just for this operation. This practice is especially necessary if you are shooting patched balls, because some of the cloth might stay lurking in the barrel and can cause mischief. You can swab between shots to avoid that problem, but don’t count on this to thoroughly rid your barrel of hazards.
I knew a guy who participated in reenactments. He was on a crew that was operating a cannon with a 2-inch bore. His job was to swab the barrel then push the bag of powder down afterwards. The bag of powder weighed 1 pound. One time after the team fired, he swabbed and then shoved the powder down the barrel, instantly losing most of his right hand. There was still a cinder in the barrel from the previous bag, and when he pushed the powder down, it went off. The long rod with a disc he was using to push the powder down was the same diameter as the barrel. When the canon went off, the disc removed most of his hand because it became a projectile. Safety requires methodical steps and preparation.
Once the powder is in, you can seat the bullet. Initially, there will be a little resistance, but it shouldn’t be excessive. If it is, find out why before attempting to push it the bullet in too deep. A bullet stuck in the barrel is a pain to remove, although it can be done usually with a corkscrew-type device.

It is imperative that the bullet is solidly seated to the powder in the chamber. Otherwise, serious damage can occur to the firearm and shooter.

It is imperative that the bullet is solidly seated to the powder in the chamber. Otherwise, serious damage can occur to the firearm and shooter.

After you get your round started, follow through using your long rod to seat it. The bullet must be tight against the powder. If there is no resistance from the bullet going down the barrel, it might move forward creating some airspace, so be wary of that. This could destroy the gun and cause injury.
I knew someone who destroyed a .45-caliber that way. He required medical attention caused by splinters lodged into his forearm. If you are unsure, flick the rod against the load a couple of times. If the rod bounces, then it is ready to go. You can mark the rod with a piece of tape if desired for future loading once you establish your load.

Blackpowder-measuring tools were created for very specific purposes and are a much safer way to load a muzzleloader. Top to bottom above is a priming tool, powder measure and primer measure.

Blackpowder-measuring tools were created for very specific purposes and are a much safer way to load a muzzleloader. Top to bottom above is a priming tool, powder measure and primer measure.

Sometimes people forget to put the powder in first. This is a pain, but it can be resolved. Just take off the nipple and work some powder into the barrel. You should put at least 15 to 20 grains to have enough to shoot the ball completely out the barrel. Make sure that the projectile exits before trying a regular load. Compressed air can also be used to push the ball out. There are two types of people who shoot muzzleloaders: those who forgot to put the powder in and those who will in the future.

PHOTO 3A 30-30 ss 009 - CopyPRIMING
Just in case you bump or drop your gun, it is not a good idea to prime before you load. With a flintlock, just prime the  pan and you are ready to go. For this article we will stick with conventional muzzleloaders as opposed to inlines.

BACK TO THE POWDER
If you are new to this game, you might wonder how much powder to use. Ideally, a new shooter would spend some time with an experienced blackpowder user. There are also books that can help. Blackpowder doesn’t produce as much velocity as the smokeless variety, no matter how much you use. At some point the powder just won’t burn and will simply come out the end of the barrel. You can put an old sheet on the ground in front of the gun to determine if you have too much powder. This test can be very informative.
In my .50-caliber Hawkins, I use 90 grains of FFG black with a 370-grain maxi ball. My velocities run almost 1,300 feet per second, and the load is very consistent and accurate. I have tried more powder but the gain was negligible, thus wasn’t worth the extra powder. If you are shooting a .45-caliber with a ball, 70 grains is a good starting point. If you are using a .58-caliber rifle with Minié balls, then 60 grains is a good place to start. I find that lighter loads in these guns generally produce better accuracy.

Powder horns were and are still common among muzzleloaders. The horn is strapped to the shooter and stores the bulk of their powder.

Just like reloading, you might experiment with your gun to see which combination works best. There are several brands of powder out there, so if you like to experiment, try what is available in your area. If you order online, be prepared to pay a hefty hazardous material fee, so ordering a large quantity helps cut costs. I order it by 25-pound cases. There are also fees for just smokeless powder and primers, but not loaded ammo.

BULLET OPTIONS 

Bob Shell with his .50-caliber flintlock.

Bob Shell smoking up the range with his .50-caliber flintlock.

The round ball is the basic, most widely used bullet and has some advantages. It is often very light for the caliber, which reduces the amount of powder needed for workable velocities. Another advantage is it reduces recoil. Properly loaded it is very accurate and is used for all types of target shooting. For hunting, it’s OK for certain types of deer, but might lack the penetration for large, heavy-boned game, especially past 100 yards. Due to its low density, it doesn’t carry or penetrate well. However, a .36-caliber ball makes a splendid small-game round. There you have the basics of muzzleloading blackpowder. Stayed tuned for part III of What Is black Powder, where we cover tricks of the trade. ASJ

Loading blackpowder may seem like a simple process, but there are inherent dangers if steps are not completed thoroughly and methodically.

Posted in Black Powder Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

October 12th, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

Step 1: Read The Instructions

Story and photographs by Mike Nesbitt

Mike NesbittHunting with muzzleloaders is popular enough that most states have special or separate seasons for hunters using them. The rules for those seasons vary, so if you are setting up a hunt, even near home, do a little homework to see which guns, calibers, sights and styles of ignition are favored during those times.

In my home state of Washington, the ignition must be exposed, which means an in-line rifle that has an enclosed percussion nipple and cap are not allowed. Also, Washington does not allow scopes on muzzleloaders when used during the muzzleloading seasons. Scoped muzzleloaders can only be used during modern-rifle seasons because they are using modern sights. Washington also has a minimum bore size of .40 caliber for deer and .50 caliber for elk.

My personal choices for muzzleloaders and smoothbores are the old-looking percussions and flintlocks that follow traditional styling. Others may favor the newer in-line rifles, which are often shorter and lighter, as well as easier to carry. I won’t argue with that. What I will say is whichever style of rifle or smoothbore you prefer, do a few things to get that gun ready before heading out on the hunt, even before sighting it in.

I’m going to be very basic about this because one year, during a muzzleloading season, we saw a new hunter beside his car trying to load a brand-new in-line rifle. The box that the gun came in was on the hood of the car, and his friends were trying to help by reading the printed instructions out loud. I don’t know how things went for that group, but in my opinion, that wasn’t the best way to start.

Before taking that first shot, you should be well equipped with all of the extras you will need. Yes, powder, patches and balls or elongated bullets, plus flints or percussion caps fall into that basket, but that’s simply the ammunition, and those things are usually, I hope, already established. Some things that are often not considered are cleaning patches, black-powder solvents, and a cleaning rod or jag for the ramrod. While those things are often not given the priority they deserve, they are actually the things that are needed first. The reason is that almost any new rifle will come with oils in the barrel and in the breech of the gun. This should be wiped out before anything else! Yes, those oils will probably be burned out with the first few shots – that is, if the gun will fire. But the oil in the breech area can completely block the flash channel – that important link between the spark of ignition and the main powder charge. If the flash channel is blocked the gun will not fire. A very easy way to clear the flash channel on a percussion is to simply snap a cap or two, but be sure your gun isn’t loaded before doing so. This can be especially true if you have purchased a used muzzleloader. They are often put away while still loaded. Sounds elementary, but most accidents are.

It is a good idea to snap the first cap while aiming the rifle in a safe direction. Then snap a second cap with the gun’s muzzle close to the ground so you can watch for movement in the blades of grass, or even just in the dust as the blast of the cap comes through the barrel. Seeing something move near the gun’s muzzle is a good indication that the flash channel is clear.

Clear Flintlock Flash Hole

Clearing a flintlock’s flash-hole with a flash-hole pick. Yes, the pan is primed.

On a flintlock you clear the short flash channel with a flash-hole pick. I often do that both before and after the gun is loaded. Just poke the pick through the hole and after the gun is loaded you should feel powder grains moving or crumbling as you push the pick through. With that done you know the spark from the flash pan can reach the main powder charge. In fact, do that with a flintlock any time you think it is a good idea.

In addition to wiping out the bore, swab it with a good black-powder lubricant, such as Wonder Lube. That will help break in the new barrel. You should use a natural oil rather than a petroleum product, in my opinion.

Now you should be ready to sight in your rifle. Many of the custom-made muzzleloading rifles come with rear sights which are not yet notched. Cutting the notch is left to the buyer. The reason is that each shooter prefers a different size or even style of notch.  If each shooter cuts their own notch, everyone ends up satisfied.

Cutting the notch isn’t a problem, and it is certainly a small job. I prefer a narrow V-style notch and cut in it with a small knife file. While the shape and width of the sighting notch is up to each shooter, the way it is cut into the rear sight is worthy of a little discussion. I almost always cut those notches from the back of the sight with the file at an angle so the notch will be deepest at the front. When the eye looks through the notch, you will only want to see the silhouette of the sight.

Notching the rear sight

Open the rear sight notch using a small knife file. This allows the shooter to customize the visual to their preference.


With those things done you are all ready to head to the shooting range and make sure your rifle is sighted in with the bullets and powder charges you will hunt with.

You might ask me if I had done all of those things before getting my first deer with a muzzleloading rifle. Well, yes, I did. It was a fine whitetail buck taken at 125 yards on a cold snowy November afternoon, using a .54-caliber Hawken-style rifle loaded with 120 grains of FFg under the patched round ball. The .526-inch ball simply tore all of the “plumbing” from the top of the heart. Let me add that I had already been shooting for a couple of years at monthly matches and rendezvous. I will also say that I had some very good teachers, members of the Cascade Mountain Men, a muzzleloading club that is still flourishing and more than ready to accept more new members. You can visit them at cascademountainmen.com.

For those thinking about getting a muzzleloading rifle, I will quickly recommend the Lyman Great Plains Rifle. The Lyman GPR is one of the most authentic muzzleloaders on the market and it comes in either .50 or .54 caliber, with a flintlock or percussion ignition, and is available in a right- or left-handed model. I know a lot of shooters who use the Lyman GPR and they perform very well.

Now, if you take these steps before taking that first shot, you’ll be off to a good start. That good start, of course, is the real beginning and foundation for a successful hunt. ASJ

Editor’s note: For more information about the Lyman Great Plains Rifle, visit Lyman’s web site at lymanproducts.com.

Lyman’s Great Plains Rifle

Lyman’s Great Plains Rifle is available right- or left-handed versions.

 

 

 

Posted in Black Powder Tagged with: , ,

September 22nd, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

The Shiloh Sharps Rifle

An American Black Powder Tradition

Rediscover a legend!  The Sharps rifle has taken down African game along with American plains game.  Shiloh Sharps Rifle is a family owned business that has been established since 1976, and is the recognized leader in the quality production and craftsmanship of the Sharps rifle. 

We are the only company in the world whose parts interchange with the original Sharps rifles. One hundred percent American made right in Big Timber, Montana, and we will not sacrifice our quality for quantities.

When you purchase a Shiloh Sharps, you not only purchase a legendary rifle, you support a way of life that Americans have fought and died for over generations – self reliance, pride and our freedom. 

It doesn’t matter who you are, everyone can own an American masterpiece!  Come visit our showroom.  www.shilohrifle.com  or call us at 406-932-4266. We look forward to hearing from you. 

lr express

 

 

Posted in Black Powder Tagged with: , ,

June 17th, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

The Lyman Great Plains Rifle 

(Muzzleloader)

Recommendation by Mike Nesbitt
Mike Nesbitt Take two

Mike Nesbitt

If there are any readers out there who want to try muzzleloading, let me recommend a good rifle: the Lyman Great Plains. There are less expensive rifles, but my suggestion is to start with a good one. I know a lot of black-powder shooters who have these rifles and stay with them. They are available in .50- and .54-caliber and right- or left-handed models, and they are very dependable. For new shooters I also recommend starting with a percussion version simply because the flintlocks take more training and they are, let’s say, harder to get used to. ASJ

 

Lyman Great Plains Rifle

 

PHOTO SIDEBAR 1 - Lyman’s percussion Great Plains Rifle

Posted in Black Powder Tagged with: , , , , ,

June 17th, 2015 by Danielle Breteau

Good Muzzleloading Starts Here

Story and photographs by Mike Nesbitt
Mike Nesbitt Take two

Mike Nesbitt

Getting started in muzzle-loading can be a little tricky because we can only be as good as our instructors. Finding proper help sometimes can leave a new shooter on the short end of the stick. The big problem is that new shooters probably won’t know if they are being taught or shown the right stuff or not.

The very best way to get started down the right trail with muzzleloading is to find a good club and look into their activities. If those activities interest you, that’s a great start because you’ll be surrounded by a gang of shooters who share your interest. Black powder clubs are easier to find than you think. Ranges or sportsmen’s clubs in your area should steer you in the right direction.

PHOTO 1 Mike Moran President of WSMA

Mike Moran went from the world of cowboy-action shooting to becoming the new president of the Washington State Muzzleloading Association in short order.

I met an experienced cowboy-action shooter named Mike Moran who suddenly got very interested in the primitive side of muzzleloading. It’s considered primitive because we use traditionally styled muzzleloaders and not the more modern styled guns, and we still like camping in lean-tos and tepees, as well as wearing buckskins at our events. These folks are referred to as “buckskinners.”

Moran thought such doin’s were worth a try, so he bought a rifle kit, put it together and then signed up as a shooter for the rendezvous of the Paul Bunyan Plainsmen near Puyallup, Wash. (In the 1800s, American fur traders periodically met at designated places to be reunited with friends and family during weeklong gatherings called rendezvous, during which the traders would camp out, practice their shooting and throwing skills and enjoy one another’s company.) Once registered, Moran asked if someone could give him some help or guidance and he was directed to join a group of shooters that I was guiding and scoring.

Since Moran introduced himself to me the day before a shoot, I was ready for him when we got to the firing line the next morning. Moran didn’t score very highly at that event; one of the reasons was that he had not sighted-in his brand new rifle.

Moran did afterwards, and his scores have made a steady rise since that day. In fact, he recently outshot me. He has now graduated so far that he uses a flintlock rifle (a bit more difficult to use over a percussion), teaches other beginners how to shoot muzzleloaders and is now the new president of the Washington State Muzzleloading Association, which is an organization dedicated to providing shooting experience and prizes to young shooters.

PHOTO 2

Craig Brown (second from the right) with his“gang” of Boy Scouts on the trail.

The Boy Scouts of America is another group that promotes muzzleloading for young shooters, and a couple of our local groups here in western Washington are Troop 310 from Rochester and Troop 141 from Tenino. Craig Brown, a range-safety officer and instructor, personally guides these groups of youngsters, along with some volunteer assistance, through wooded trails where the scouts get a chance to shoot muzzleloading rifles at hanging steel targets. Among the activities these scouts enjoy include attending the annual Rain-de-voo (Western Shooting Journal, April 2014) of the Puget Sound Free Trappers, a subgroup of the Capital City Rifle and Pistol Club in Littlerock, Wash., each year.

PHOTO 3 View of a flintlock on a Leman trade rifle

The flintlock can be described as a system of firearm ignition generally used between 1660 and 1850. The rifle seen here is a Leman, and it was considered a trade rifle. These were often swapped with Native Americans for goods.

 

PHOTO 4 Hawken Mountain Man Gun

This custom-built lightweight Hawken has a sidelock percussion with a copper cap on the nipple. The Hawken brothers of St. Louis were famous in the early to mid-1800s for building guns tailored to the mountain men of the time. These were generally heavier guns that were reinforced through the wrist with longer tangs and trigger guards, which helped keep the rifle from being damaged through hard use. 

While out on these trail hikes, Brown makes sure that the muzzleloaders are never primed (or capped) until the boys are on the firing line and in a firing position. He is the only one in the group who actually has percussion caps, which, of course, are necessary for firing. When a scout is in position, Brown caps the rifle, which prepares the already-loaded gun for firing. This process allows him to work with just one shooter at a time, making the activity very safe.

PHOTO 2a

The instructor “caps” or primes the rifle once the student is in position and on target.

The scouts shoot on the Puget Sound Free Trappers’ range and the club is in favor of the training and experience the scouts receive, so the boys are allowed to camp and shoot there for free. If the scouts pay anything at all, I would guess it is just enough to cover the costs of the powder, ball and percussion caps.

My own start into muzzleloading might be worth telling about. I was in my midteens and working part-time in Ed Hilton’s gun shop. Ed had an original “Kentucky rifle” in .40 caliber, a flintlock that had been converted to percussion long before I ever saw it. This was in the late 1950s, and at certain times when there were no customers in the shop, one of us would ask, “Who is buying the Cokes?” With that as a cue, Ed would get the old rifle and the horn and bag, plus a paper target, and step outside where the target was posted on a large stump. Ed did all of the loading and we’d each take just one shot. The shooter with the hit farthest from center had to buy.

At that time a bottle of pop from a machine that kept the bottles hanging by their necks while cooled in cold water was just 10 cents. The Cokes, and yes, Nesbitt’s Orange, were all very chilling and quite refreshing. Those dimes were more treasured than dollars are today, and buying the pops, which I usually did, took all of the money I had, but I never missed the opportunity to shoot that old rifle.

If you would like to know more about the Washington State Muzzleloading Association, you can visit them at wamuzzleloaders.com. ASJ

 

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