October 1st, 2016 by Sam Morstan

The M240 SLR from Ohio Ordnance Works is an excellent replica of the M240 light machine gun, and it is a pleasure to shoot.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY FRANK JARDIM

Variants of the M240 general-purpose light machine gun may have earned a reputation for ruggedness and reliability on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan, but this 7.62x51mm NATO belt-fed beauty has provided U.S. Army and Marine Corps infantryman with hard-hitting firepower since the 1990s. And, although the weapon is heavier and more complicated than the Vietnam-era M60-series light machine guns it replaced, those drawbacks are far outweighed by the simple fact that it works much better.

In the “up” position, the M240 SLR’s ladder rear sight provides graduations up to 1,800 meters, or nearly 2,000 yards. Also seen in this view are the gun’s cocking handle and safety.

In the “up” position, the M240 SLR’s ladder rear sight provides graduations up to 1,800 meters, or nearly 2,000 yards. Also seen in this view are the gun’s cocking handle and safety.

The M240 was designed in the 1950s, and manufactured by Fabrique Nationale (FN) for the Belgian military as the FN MAG 58. It was eventually adopted by the armed forces of Britain, Canada, Australia and many other nations. Rather than sheet metal stampings, its receiver is made of heavy machined steel components riveted together like vintage Browning machine guns of the previous century, such as the M1919 series light machine gun and M2 .50-caliber heavy machine gun.

The United States military first took an interest in the weapon as a coaxial machine gun for tanks in the 1970s. It was very successful and proliferated on various vehicle mounts through the 1980s before it was employed in a ground role.

BOB LANDIES of Ohio Ordnance Works (OOW) in Chardon, Ohio, outside of Cleveland, specialized in making semiautomatic versions of historic American machine guns like the Browning Automatic Rifle and M1917 water-cooled heavy machine gun for collectors. So when the M240 was seeing heavy use in ground combat against Iraqi troops and later al-Qaeda insurgents, Landies hatched the idea of making a semiautomatic version to satisfy shooters in the military collector market. Following a year of design and development work, OOW patented the M240 SLR (Self Loading Rifle).

There’s nothing about the military’s FN gun that’s cheap, and the same holds true with its replica. That’s reflected in its $13,917 retail price. But before you have an aneurism, consider that you can’t own a real military full-auto M240 because there are virtually none for sale to civilian collectors. The closest thing to it would be a vintage original FN MAG 58, but that gun looks different and is going to start at $100,000 anyway. So, if you must have a shooting replica of the iconic, battle-proven M240 light machine gun in your collection, you’re already shopping in the luxury gun market.

The front sight blade is narrow, so it doesn’t obscure the target and allows for precise aiming.

The front sight blade is narrow, so it doesn’t obscure the target and allows for precise aiming.

The Ohio Ordnance Works model will live up to expectations. It comes in a custom hard case, and the color instruction manual is one of the best I’ve ever seen. Be warned, this gun is addictively fun to shoot. However, if you have the coin to buy it, you can probably spring for the ammo and other accessories without too much financial strain.

There hasn’t been any good bargain military surplus 7.62mm NATO around in a long time, but relatively cheap, steel-cased, berdan-primed offerings from Russian makers Tula, Bear and Wolf can be had for as low as 37 cents a round in 500-round cases. Brass-cased, boxer-primed Winchester or Federal ammo sells in bulk for 75 to 85 cents a round in the typical military 147-grain FMJ load.

Each M240 SLR comes with 5,000 M-13 disintegrating links, which ought to be a lifetime supply for the average shooter, assuming you take a minute or two to recover them off the range with an old speaker magnet after you shoot. Making up your belts can be done by hand while watching TV, but it is faster and easier on the hands to use a special tray-like belt linker that loads 20 rounds at a time. Expect to pay around $200 for one of these, but the time saved will be well worth the price, and OOW makes a very nice aluminum belt loader for $225.

 

After opening the top cover (left), you load the M240 SLR by pushing the belt into the feed tray from the left side of the receiver until it hits the built-in stops.

After opening the top cover (left), you load the M240 SLR by pushing the belt into the feed tray from the left side of the receiver until it hits the built-in stops.

WITH A FEW 250-ROUND belts loaded up, I headed to Knob Creek Range in West Point, Ky., southwest of Louisville, to test out the M240 SLR at various ranges out to 300 yards using the built-in bipod and excellent iron sights. When the ladder rear sight is folded down, you aim through an aperture machined onto the back of it with settings up to 800 meters. Beyond that distance you can flip the ladder up and there are graduations up to 1,800 meters.

When the ladder is up, the rear sight changes to an open “U” notch machined into the ladder slide. The front sight blade is quite narrow, which I liked because it didn’t obscure my target and allowed for more precise aiming. All of your elevation and windage adjustments to zero the rifle are done from the front sight, and once you lock it in place, it stays in place.

The manufacturer warns that the rifle should never be cocked while the safety is on because it can seriously damage the trigger group. Because of that warning, I didn’t load the gun until I was on my belly ready to fire, and I kept the safety off except when I had to interrupt firing to take notes.1610-ordnance-04a

To load the rifle, you depress the two knurled tabs on either side of the rear of the receiver top cover to open it, and push the belt into the feed tray from the left side of the receiver until it hits the built-in stops. You hold the first round of the belt against the stops with your left hand while your right hand pushes the cover down, snapping it into place and securing the belt in the action.

Once you’ve done this, you can pick the rifle up and shoot from other positions and on the move and the belt won’t fall out. Be careful to keep the belted ammo clean. Don’t drag it on the ground behind you as you shoot and move.

The rifle’s integral bipod is made of heavy welded stampings. It’s very steady, and locks solidly under the gas system when not in use. Since the rifle weighs nearly 27 pounds (a couple pounds heavier than the old M60), I used the bipod for all my testing. The broad curved buttplate sits easily on top of your shoulder when shooting prone. I grabbed the wrist of the buttstock with my off hand to hold it firmly against my shoulder.

Past experience with belt-feds taught me that the barrel gets very hot, very fast, and I didn’t want any part of my body to touch it. The barrel assembly has a foregrip in the form of a built-in lower handguard with a strip of Picatinny rail solidly screwed on the left and right side and a snap-on ventilated heat shield on the top.

The M240 SLR also features a threaded quick release barrel.

The M240 SLR also features a threaded quick release barrel.

A rugged carrying handle is built into the barrel assembly, and it folds down so it doesn’t obstruct the sights. Like the military full-auto M240, this semiauto version has a quickchange barrel. To remove the barrel, grasp the carrying handle and depress the small lever underneath it while rotating it into the vertical position. This unlocks the interrupted threads that secure it in the trunnion, and allows the whole assembly to slide forward off the gun for cleaning.

This should go without saying, but when picking up the rifle by its carrying handle, don’t touch that little lever! If you do, you may embarrass yourself by dropping the rear two-thirds of the rifle on the ground in midstride. A blunder like that could take years to live down.

The barrel assembly has Picatinny rails solidly screwed on the left and right (shown here) side, and a snap-on ventilated heat shield on the top.

The barrel assembly has Picatinny rails solidly screwed on the left and right (shown here) side, and a snap-on ventilated heat shield on the top.

AS WITH ANY BELT FED GUN, there’s lots going on mechanically, and you can feel all those moving parts doing their thing while you’re shooting. Cases eject from the bottom directly below the action, and the links are tossed about 10 inches to the right in nice piles. And recoil is mild enough that my 8-year-old son had no issues shooting the M240 SLR.

Unlike the full-auto version, the semiauto fires from a closed bolt, and I expected that this would improve accuracy. To evaluate its capabilities, I tested Black Hills Gold .308 Win Match loaded with 155-grain Hornady A-Max bullets, white box Winchester 7.62 x 51mm loaded with 147-grain FMJ bullets and Federal American Eagle .308 Win. loaded with 150-grain FMJ boat-tail bullets.

The author thoroughly enjoyed testing the SLR in the field.

The author thoroughly enjoyed testing the SLR in the field.

I fired three five-shot groups, each at 100 yards from the prone position using the bipod. The Black Hills match lived up to its reputation and produced an average group size of 2.83 inches, with the best group being 2.44 inches. This was despite the plastic tips getting ripped off some of the bullets during the chambering operation.

The M240 was tested using rounds from Winchester, American Eagle and Black Hills.

The M240 was tested using rounds from Winchester, American Eagle and Black Hills.

The Federal load averaged 3.10 inches, with the best group being 2.69 inches. Winchester followed closely behind with a 3.33-inch average, and the best group again being 2.69 inches.

Though I didn’t shoot as well as I could have (I was having a problem with my contact lenses drying on my eyes), that’s still some decent shooting with open sights. The rifle was better than I was that day, and is surely capable of more. It has a Picatinny rail machined into the top cover where the military customarily mounts optics. If I had the right scope, I bet I could have gotten the minute-of-angle performance others have found the rifles to produce.

You can see some great video clips and get more info about the M240 SLR and related accoutrements on the OOW website at ohioordnanceworks.com or call them at (440) 285-3481. ASJ

The Ohio Ordnance Works M240 SLR replica will live up to your expectations.

The Ohio Ordnance Works M240 SLR replica will live up to your expectations.

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