September 12th, 2018 by asjstaff

Probably you’ve noticed that the industry of firearm safety products is largely an industry
of electronic gadgets. Handgun safes are often little more than toys. So, in response to
complaints I’ve received about unreliable electronic safes, I recently looked at AMSEC’s
Heavy-Duty Pistol Safe, model PS1210HD, which features a mechanical lock.
In one sense, I could summarize my findings and state simply: “It’s great. If you need a
handgun safe, buy this one.”
The safe has outstanding features, including a scratch-resistant finish, a protective
housing for the lock, and reinforcement for the hinge at the back. The entire box is made
of 10-gauge steel. The lock is a KABA Simplex lock, designed to withstand years of
steady use. The safe also has a handle to allow for portability, and it has pre-drilled holes
for mounting.
Now, I need to clear up a misunderstanding I created a couple of years ago regarding the
KABA Simplex lock. In a 2016 video I pointed out that, given enough time, a person
could stumble upon the combination of a Simplex lock. What I failed to explain is how
difficult that is. If you need convincing, look around online for a video showing someone
banging through all 1,082 possible combinations in one long, sustained attack. You won’t
find anything.
I doubt anyone will ever record such a video. The attack is hard to perform. It’s easy to
get lost in the sequence of combinations. And it hurts. When I tried banging through the
combinations, I had to go for 30 seconds at a time and then added all the time up.
Probably I added wrong and it took longer than I estimated. The point is this: A Simplex
lock is more than enough deterrent to stop an opportunist who tries breaking into your
safe.
And now, my only complaint about this safe: The gas strut attached to the lid is the same
gas strut used in the Stealth Tactical Original Handgun Safe and the Fort Knox Original
Pistol Box. When you go to throw the lid open, the strut wants to fight you. Conversely,
when you release the lid, the strut will not catch the lid, allowing it to bag shut on one’s thumb—if one is something of klutz, like me. I would like to see AMSEC replace the gas strut with one that lets you thrown the lid open and that catches the lid to prevent it from banging shut.
If you’ve seen my work online, you know that I test and compromise firearm safety
products. Then I record demonstration video highlighting my findings. Then I post my
video online and hope that I’ve prevented another gun from getting into the wrong hands.
With AMSEC’s Heavy-Duty Pistol Safe, there are no significant design flaws to expose,
which sounds like I’m doing sales—I realize that. But this is not paid advertising. I’m
just trying the share positive findings when I can, and AMSEC’s eavy-Duty Pistol Safe is
only the second safe to receive my HandgunSafeResearch.com seal of approval.

By Dave Goetzinger

Posted in Industry Tagged with: ,

June 15th, 2018 by asjstaff

Don’t let your Gun get Stolen

By Dave Goetzinger

Back in April of 2018, a small import company released a new handgun safe onto the market through Amazon. The company, called Amarey, is no big player in the gun world, but its gun safe rose to #1 New Release status within two weeks, then went on to become Amazon’s bestselling handgun safe.
As the guy who runs HandgunSafeResearch.com, I decided to look at Amarey’s gun safe.
The handgun safe, model HFGS-089, is supposedly designed to do double-duty as a handgun safe and portable case.
The blurb on the Amazon product page says:
Gun Safe – Pistol Safe Portable Gun Safe with Biometric Sensor Chip, Auto-Open Lid, Qucik Access.
Gun Safe Mountable on Wall. Waterproof Fire Resistant, 100% Safety. 5 Year Warranty.
Buried in the above are a couple over-the-top lies.
The device is not actually watertight, and therefore is not “Waterproof.” Nor is it made of fire-retardant materials, so it isn’t any more “Fire Resistant” than an Altoid tin.

As for the expression “100% Safety,” I can confirm this device offers no safety. I found two ways of opening it covertly—that is, without damaging the safe or leaving clear indications as to how I gained access—and neither method requires the use of lock-picking tools.
One method can be accomplished by a child.
The safe is made of thin, 18-gauge steel, the box weighing a mere 4.4 lbs. (Snapsafe lock boxes, which I’ve spent time exposing online, are made of higher-quality steel than this.)
The safe’s top-opening door fits loosely and the latching mechanism inside is so weak the lid can be pulled open by hand.
A child lacking the hand strength to do this could still open it by prying at the lid with a screwdriver or a table knife.

Amarey, HFGS-089: World's Worst Gun Safe from Handgun Safe Research on Vimeo.

In addition, the mounting holes in the bottom of the device open right into the latching mechanism, allowing the thing to be opened with a paper clip.
This last detail is bizarre, considering the device is supposed to be appropriate for use as a portable case. The gun owner is supposed to believe it is secure if it is anchored with nothing but the supplied cable.
Amazon’s product page for this device features an overwhelming number of 5-star reviews.
And how did such a flimsy product accumulate 5-star reviews? A flyer inside every safe offers a package of 25 free shooting targets to those customers who write an Amazon review.
This is a violation of Amazon policies.
I try not to sound like an alarmist when making my investigative findings public, but in this case I’m sounding the alarm. If people are trusting their handguns to Amarey’s gun safe, somebody is going to get hurt or killed.
Amazon needs to halt sales of this product, and Amarey needs to recall it.

Posted in Miscellaneous Tagged with: ,

February 12th, 2018 by asjstaff

When you see those big gun safes that people buy, you probably think that its theft-proof.
Gun safe manufacturers offers a variety of safes for the many different users in their market. Such as the inexpensive for the hunters in their cabin to the high-end heavy duty for the more affluent buyer.
No matter how tough it looks to get into these gun safes, you can see how 10 dollars (hand saw) can get you into one of these heavy gun safes.

As you can see it doesn’t take a lot to get into the best ones in the market.
Some excellent advices is if your gun safe have thin sidewalls, consider boxing it into a corner, so that the door is the only exposed area.
For added security bolt the safe to the floor from the interior, this is a huge plus giving you another layer of theft proofing it.
One gun safe company that you might want to check out is Liberty Safe Company. They design their safes with an eye to prevent break-ins, if not then it really slow down the bad guys.

Which gun safes do you use?

Posted in Miscellaneous Tagged with: ,

June 22nd, 2017 by asjstaff

When you spend lots of money on a gun safe, you’d imagine if it was theft proof.
I can’t even begin to count the number of different gun safe brands out on the market right now. From super inexpensive options that are perfect for the hunting cabin, to extremely high-end super heavy duty safes that are a work of art on the outside, there’s a gun safe for every application.

As sad as it is, watch Tom from Secureit Gun Storage using a tool which only cost 10 bucks can get you into some of the heaviest gun safes.


Modular Firearm Storage is the Smart Choice
As the video shows, it doesn’t take a that much to get into even some of the best safes on the market. If your home gun safe has relatively thin sidewalls, you might want to consider boxing it into a corner, so that the door is the only exposed piece. For additional security, be sure to bolt the safe to the floor from the interior, it will definitely make a big difference!

If you’re looking for a new gun safe this year, check out the Lincoln Series from the Liberty Safe Company. It’s a seriously rock-solid piece of equipment that will have no issues protecting your gear this season. Every angle of this safe has been designed to detour thefts, including the sides of this series. With 90 minutes of fire protection, the Lincoln Series has you covered even during the worst disaster.

Sources: SecureIt Gun Storage, Liberty Safe Company, Mike Reeber

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Posted in Industry Tagged with: ,

January 22nd, 2016 by asjstaff

Can a Safe hold up against a Shotgun?

One of our past articles showed some flaws with the security of a gun safe and how you can accidentally crack those safes. Those techniques were considered the “soft” method. What about cracking it the old fashion way of “brute force”.

Taofledermaus has just the improvised shotgun shell to try on this tough target.

This test of wax slugs is against an old safe. Can an old safe be penetrated by these wax slugs? Well, a full can of beer is what is being protected inside of this safe.

Watch as a shotgun loaded with wax slugs tries to strong arm it. At first try the rounds went through but missed the beer can inside the gun safe. Second try the rounds went through the safe and destroyed the beer can. The damage is quite impressive to say the least.

Matt the shooter used a Mossberg 590 12 ga shotgun with wax slugs.

Wax slugs are home-improvised shotgun shells with the shot mixed with wax. This causes the shot and wax to hit the target like a slug.

Not much can hold up against the power of a 12 gauge shotgun.

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Story by Eric Nestor revised by AmSJ
Source: Youtube, Taofledermaus

Posted in Just Plinking Tagged with: , ,