October 2nd, 2018 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]With the introduction of the American Pistol Compact, Ruger’s line of patently patriotic firearms expands and shrinks at the same time.[/su_heading]

STORY AND PHOTOS BY BRAD FITZPATRICK

 
[su_dropcap style=”flat” size=”5″]B[/su_dropcap]ill Ruger would have turned 100 years old in 2016, and even though he is gone I believe that he would have been quite impressed with the innovative firearm designs that continue to appear on pages of his namesake company’s annual catalog. Unlike Colt, Smith & Wesson, Remington and Winchester, which were all operating in the 1800s, the Ruger brand is relatively new. But in just over 60 years, Ruger guns have earned a spot near the top of all American gun manufacturers. In firearms manufacturing terms that’s a meteoric rise, and it doesn’t seem to be slowing.

The pistol is a polymer-framed, striker-fired semiauto, and is available in 9mm (shown here) and .45.


The American Compact enters the most competitive arena in gundom, and is the most recent combatant in the fierce battle for carry-gun supremacy. And while Glock may have brought life to the polymer frame/striker-fire gun category, they are hardly the only game in town anymore. Virtually every major handgun manufacturer has some sort of gun that fits this mold, and more are coming.

For the past few years, Ruger has launched several products under the American name (which is fitting, since these guns are made in the U.S.), most recently adding the American Pistol to round out their patriotically themed rimfire and centerfire rifle families. The Ruger American is a polymer-framed, striker-fired semiauto available in 9mm and .45. It offers many of the same features you’ll find on competing guns, such as interchangeable grips, a bladed trigger, and an accessory rail tucked under the gun’s muzzle. The price is one that any hard-working American can afford: $579 MSRP, with lower prices around for bargain shoppers.

The author tested the model version with an ambidextrous manual safety.


The standard American has a 4.2-inch barrel in 9mm and a 4.5-inch pipe in .45. With a full magazine, the 9mm version offers an impressive 17+1-round capacity, and while the gun is great fun at the range, it’s a bit big to break into the main channel of the concealed carry market. But Ruger was one step ahead, planning (and now offering) a compact version of the American semiauto pistol.

It’s not as though Ruger needed another compact gun, truthfully. This is, after all, the brand that brought us the LCP and LCP II, LC380, LC9s, SR9/SR40C, and they also now offer a 1911 Commander as well. But the concealed carry market continues to grow, and having a full portfolio never hurts, so they have added the American Pistol Compact to that mix.
 
THE 9MM COMPACT VERSION of the American (the full-sized model is called the Duty) sports a 3.55-inch barrel (3.75inch in .45) with a length of just 6.65 inches. Designing a carry gun is always a give and take with regard to overall size; small guns are easy to hide and carry, but they aren’t as comfortable to shoot or as accurate (in most cases) as larger, longer-barreled guns. The American Duty pistol is a very comfortable gun to shoot at the range, with great sights and an excellent trigger that mate well with its grip geometry and control layout. But it’s big; too big for most people to carry.

The front and rear Novak sights provide good target acquisition, even in dim light or for those with poor eyesight.


The Ruger trigger has a good deal of take-up and breaks at six pounds, but the reset is positive and short, so you can deliver fast follow-ups.

The Compact, on the other hand, does a great job balancing on that middle ground that makes it just the right size for everyday concealment. It weighs right around 29 ounces (a little more or less depending upon whether or not you opt for a manual safety) and measures – again depending on your safety option – just under or over an inch and a half wide at the controls. It utilizes a double-stack magazine that gives you 12 shots in 9mm, unless you live some place that forbids that amount of firepower, in which case you’ll be deducted a couple shots.

Concealed carry is indeed a numbers game, and the American Compact has the data required to be a serious player. But to do a proper evaluation on any carry gun, we need to take a close look at all the features and see how they stack up against the competition.

I put about 200 rounds of 9mm ammo through the American Compact I was testing, and although it’s hardly torturing the gun, that many rounds offers plenty of feedback on what this gun will do. I used three different loads for the test – Hornady’s American Gunner with 115-grain XTP bullets, SIG Sauer’s 124-grain Elite Performance V-Crown, and Nosler’s Defense Bonded Performance 124-grain +P load. It wasn’t any accident that I chose these loads, either, for they’ve all proven to be effective and accurate, and I’d stake my life on any of them.

The American Compact field strips quickly and easily.


There are some striker-fired semiauto carry guns that seem to eat anything you feed them, and the Compact is one of them. I fed it magazine after magazine, fired from the bench at 15 yards and from standing and kneeling positions. I did draws, drills, and double-taps, all in an effort to see if this gun runs. And, in fact, it does. It feeds nicely, the magazine is well built and easy to use with springs that function well but don’t exhaust the hands when loading (if your mitts do get tired, there’s a mag loading tool included with the gun, though).

In 205 rounds tested there were 205 proper feeds, proper extractions, and proper ejections. The only inconsistency was that the slide didn’t stay open once, but when you’re talking about roughly 40 magazine changes over the course of the test I don’t consider that an issue. In short, the American Compact will function well with good loads. It isn’t particularly finicky, and it functions well.
 
I PLACE CONTROL DESIGN AND LAYOUT near the top of my priority list when evaluating a carry gun. Over the course of the last decade, controls on carry guns have been consistently shrinking – in some cases, disappearing altogether – with the idea being that fewer controls are less likely to hang up when drawing and less confusing when shooting. I suppose that there’s some validity to this, but I’ve drawn dozens and dozens of test guns over that same time period and I have yet to have a slide stop or safety hang-up when I was doing my part. What I have had happen – and what seems to happen with some regularity – is that I have tested striker-fired guns with such Lilliputian controls that I have to fuss with a teeny tiny slide stop during a reload.

The pistol was on target with a variety of loads, including these Nosler Defense rounds.


I offer this lengthy thought to laud praise on the American Compact. I tested the version with an ambidextrous manual safety in large part because a lot of people who carry concealed want a manual safety (if you just rolled your eyes, there’s a version called the Pro Model for you). At its most basic level, the Ruger’s safety operates like that of a 1911 in as much as you press the lever down to fire and elevate it to activate. It’s fairly narrow but easy to find and manipulate, a good combination on a carry gun. There’s no fiddling with a tiny, heavy button – one swipe of the thumb and you’re ready.
 
The ambidextrous slide stop is fairly small but functional and, like the safety, shouldn’t hang when drawing. The takedown lever remains tucked out of the way on the front of the frame, but it makes disassembly a cinch. A subtle depression and polymer bump keep the shooting hand thumb in place, and just below that you’ll find the triangular magazine release button. If you choose the Pro Model and eliminate the manual safety, it’s a clean but functional control landscape, and even with the safety lever this gun is easy to holster, draw and hide.

Triggers on striker-fired guns range from pretty good to terribly sloppy, and you simply can’t expect the same performance you’ll get from a single action. That being said, the Ruger trigger is on solidly the plus side of striker guns. There’s a good deal of take-up and the trigger breaks at 6 pounds, but the reset is positive and short, so you can deliver fast follow-ups.

The author tested the gun with Versacarry’s new Commander OWB (shown here) and Quick Slide OWB/IWB holsters.


THIS GUN IS MEANT TO BE CARRIED, so for eight days the Ruger was my traveling companion just about everywhere I went. I tested it with Versacarry’s new Commander OWB and Quick Slide OWB/IWB holsters, opting for the Commander when I was wearing a jacket or wasn’t as concerned about concealing the gun and switching to the Quick Slide when I wanted to be sure the gun was out of sight.

The double-stack magazine makes the American Compact slightly wider than the ultrathin single stacks from Ruger and others, but with a maximum width of just 1½ inches with the manual safety this gun isn’t terrible hard to conceal, and at 30 ounces it rides well in both holsters without the need for a really heavy belt. It’s also worth noting that the grip angle promotes a positive, high grip when drawing the gun, so it’s easy to be consistent when engaging a target.

There are two options for magazines; one with a flat bottom and another with a finger extension. Measuring 5¼ inches from top to bottom with the finger extension magazine installed, the gun is compact enough that you could easily carry with either mag. In fact, I carried with the finger extension in place the whole time and never had any issues with printing, although it was winter and I wore a light jacket almost everywhere I went. As previously mentioned, Ruger built this gun with specifications that allow it to be carried relatively easily (though it won’t vanish under light clothing like the LCP II), yet it’s fun to shoot at the range.

The American Compact feels more like a midsized pistol – Ruger’s American Duty or SR9, a Glock 19/17 or Walther PPQ – than a singlestack ultracompact 9mm.


Sometimes shooting a compact pistol on the range is a real chore; recoil can be excessive when shooting ultralight pistols with narrow grips coupled with hot defensive loads. The American Compact is much more subdued, feeling (at least with the finger extension magazine, which you’ll probably using at the range anyway) more like a midsized pistol – Ruger’s American Duty or SR9, a Glock 19/17 or Walther PPQ – than a single-stack ultracompact 9mm. The three rounds tested performed well (see chart) and groups around 1½ inches were the norm when fired from 15 feet off the bench while using sand bags.

The gun comes with three interchangeable grips (small, medium and large), and there are two options for magazines: one with a flat bottom and another with a finger extension.


But the real test for this gun was how it handled off the bench, and it performed quite well when delivering double-taps, performing lateral and horizontal movement drills, and when drawing and firing. The trigger, as previously mentioned, has a short reset, and that high grip and a relatively low bore axis helps keeps recoil manageable for quick follow-ups. Those Novak sights are a nice touch, too, and even in dim light or with poor eyesight you’ll be able to see the white dots.

The American comes with three easily interchangeable grips, so if you want to change the feel of the gun, it’s easy to do. There’s also a Picatinny rail, so if you want to add a laser or light that won’t be a problem either.

In closing, the Ruger American Compact is a great gun for those who appreciate its simple-to-use design, good trigger and reliable engineering. It’s a crowded and tough market out there, but the American deserves a spot on your short list when comparing 9mm carry guns.  ASJ

The Ruger American Pistol Compact is an excellent addition to the company’s patriotic line of U.S.-built handguns and rifles.

Posted in Handguns Tagged with: , , , ,

July 9th, 2018 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]Does it really matter?[/su_heading]

The debate over the 9mm and .45 ACP is one of the most talked about in the firearms community.
Both handguns/calibers have a huge following thanks to their popularity and success in the field.
So which one is better you ask?

9mm vs .45 ACP Match Ups
One of the biggest mistake that most people make is taking a black-and-white stance (only looking at ballistics stats) on the .45 ACP and 9mm.

Many will say that the .45 is better because it shoots a bigger caliber bullet, or that the 9mm is better because of its higher magazine capacity.

Both points are spot on and provide good reasons to prefer one over the other.
Even if you think more bullets is better, you have to admit having bigger bullets with more bullets on tap are both worthy considerations when choosing one gun over the other.
If you look at the bigger picture is that neither gun has a total advantage over the other one, and your own preferences will play a lot in determining which handgun is for you.
Let’s take a look at the major points of each caliber to help you decide.

The 9mm
Manufactured will pitch it as being compact and easier to handle than its .45 ACP counterpart which may be the many reason why the 9mm has become one of the most popular rounds in the gun world.
Just like the .45ACP, the 9mm have served the U.S. military gloriously for more than 30 years.
Yes, even the FBI dropped their .40 S&W pistol in favor of the 9mm.
Here are some of the advantages that the 9mm has over the .45 ACP:

  • 9mm Luger outperforms most of the premium line .40 S&W and .45 Auto projectiles tested by the FBI
  • 9mm Luger offers higher magazine capacities, less recoil, lower cost (both in ammunition and wear on the weapons) and higher functional reliability rates (in FBI weapons)
  • The majority of FBI shooters are both FASTER in shot strings fired and more ACCURATE with shooting a 9mm Luger vs shooting a .40 S&W (similar sized weapons)

A question to consider for the pro .45ACP carrier, is carrying bigger necessarily better?
The 9mm also has a higher muzzle velocity than the .45 ACP because it uses lighter bullets. Which has caused further debates within the firearms groups over which is better, a fast/light cartridge or a heavy/slow one?

The .45 ACP
If you like the idea of shooting a gun with a lot of stopping power – you’re not alone.
With its heritage engraved in history the trusted Colt M1911 to the modern .45 Glocks, it has always been a most reliable caliber for the gun owners.
Many of us handgun lovers believe that bigger is better and love everything that the .45 ACP has to offer. Here are some of .45ACP’s best features:

  • .45s stopping power makes it a great home defense gun
  • Over-penetration isn’t as much of a problem
  • Battle tested for over 100 years which have produced some very powerful .45 ACP bullets

On a irrelevant side note, the .45 ACP is a very cool handgun.


Looking at the Two
The advancement of technology has improved the 9mm cartridge, it didn’t get better than the .45s. But, that the 9mm capability caught up to the .45 ACP.
What the experts are saying is that the modern 9mm is just as powerful.
Take a look at these pics highlighting rounds that opens up to create possible nasty wound channels that can stop an attacker:

147gr Federal HST Expansion


That is some serious expansion from the 9mm rounds.
But don’t forget developments for the .45 is also available with FMJ.

Winchester 230 gr Ranger T-Series 45 ACP


While the 147gr Federal HST expanded from 9mm (roughly .35cal) to an average 15mm or .61″, the .45 ACP expanded from (again, roughly) 11.5mm to 25mm (.45″ to 1″)
They both doubled in size…and since .45 ACP is bigger to start with, it became humongous in the end.

Not Breaking the Bank
Affordablity, is something that the 9mm is in favor for the average shooters.
Boxes of 9mm Luger are cheaper than the .45s ammo.
When you’re spending some long range time, the 9mm isn’t going to break the bank.

Velocity – Suppressed
We have to mention this because there are folks that love shooting their .45s suppressed. The .45 is a subsonic bullet, because it fires slow and its a heavy bullet, the muzzle velocity is lower than the 9mm which makes it damn near-whisper level.

Tactical Situation
This is mainly for military and LEO’s but you could be faced with similar situation, if needed.
Most of these folks have gone with the 9mm because they wanted the deeper bullet penetration.
For home defense only, go with the .45 ACP for less penetration, you won’t have to worry about hitting innocent bystanders.

Last Shot
What you choose to go with depends on your budget and life style.
Each caliber has it good points, sometimes it depends on the owner.
Are you a good shooter that can work that gun well? Or, are you just one that only wants to have a gun and never think of practicing with it.
Maybe you’re the tactile person thats into the feel of a handgun.
Some like the heavier weight with a decent kick.
While others prefer the lighter recoil for rapid shots.
Will you be carrying for open or concealed? For CCW, most will go with the 9mm because of the smaller profile. Again, its up to you.
The good news is that which ever you choose, manufacturers has them for you to choose from. You’ll find the 9mm and .45 ACP for home defense, EDC, SHTF or just plinking papers.
Which caliber do you prefer?, Let us know below.

Sources: FBI, Lucky Gun, Youtuber Edwin Sarkisian

Posted in Ammo Tagged with: , ,

November 2nd, 2017 by Danielle Breteau

Why I Use 9mm Bullets

Story and photographs by John Johnston of BaLLISTIC RADIO

Last Updated Oct 16, 2017
Here’s my take on it and personal reasoning behind selecting a 9mm bullets:

  • Capacity
  • Recoil
  • It’s Cheap

When I used to work at a gun store I was frequently asked what caliber was best for any given situation. It would have been nice if there had been some sort of magic death ray that I could have suggested, but there isn’t, and most people have a pretty flawed understanding of what actually happens when a bullet interacts with a human target.

bullet bFor starters let’s examine a couple of concepts that don’t actually exist in the scientific world but everyone talks about anyway. I’m going to regurgitate the work from those better than myself, and the information is worth paying attention to.

KNOCKDOWN POWER

This doesn’t actually exist. If a bullet had enough force to knock down an individual, it would also knock down the individual firing the gun. People do not go flying through the air when hit by a bullet, contrary to what the movies and television would have us believe. Newton’s Third Law and all.

ENERGY DUMP

On the back of a box of ammo, manufacturers list the foot-pounds of energy (ft-lbf, or foot-pounds of force/energy) that their rounds have. Well, that doesn’t actually matter. The terminal performance of a projectile is determined solely by how much tissue it cuts, crushes or tears. While it has been advocated by many-a-misinformed-gun-counter commando that some sort of energy transfer occurs between a projectile and its target, this has been rejected by everyone I respect who studies terminal ballistics for a living.

bullet c

9MM IS FOR GIRLS AND SISSIES 

How often have you heard, “If you’re not carrying a caliber that begins with the number four and ends with the number five, you’re doing it wrong”? This almost makes sense if we were limited to nonexpanding ammunition, but most of us aren’t. When we compare modern hollow-point rounds in popular service calibers, there is, on average, one-tenth of an inch of difference in expanded diameter between a 9mm and a .45ACP. Grab a ruler and look at a tenth of an inch. It doesn’t seem like much, does it? That’s because it’s not.

FUN FACT

In autopsies of gunshot-wound victims, the wound track created by a 9mm is indistinguishable from that created by a .45ACP.

The only advantage that a larger caliber is going to offer you, in my mind, is slightly better performance through intermediate barriers. Probably one of the more commonly encountered intermediate barriers is the front or rear windshield of a car. That’s not to say that the smaller caliber doesn’t perform well through those same barriers; it’s just that the larger ones perform only slightly better. Tempered auto glass has a nasty tendency to deflect bullets from their original course, as well as separate metal jackets from their lead-core bullets. It’s for this reason that .40S&W gained so much popularity in law-enforcement circles during the early 1990s.

bullet aThe nice thing is, with modern designs, most service ammunition is going to perform pretty well through barriers, and it is for this reason that a lot of larger law enforcement departments are switching back to or have been using 9mm all along. Some notable examples are the NYPD and my very own Cincinnati Police Department, which is using the 9mm 147-grain Ranger T series fired from their Smith and Wesson M&P9s. The PDX1 Bonded ammo line is the civilian version of this round with the only difference being price.

Image125

So, since I’m happy with the 9mm’s performance through barriers, and all handgun calibers suck anyway (editor’s disclaimer: the views of the author are not necessarily the views of the world at large but his determination, confidence and delivery is inspiring), here is why I like 9mm:

IMG_6371

An H&K P7M13 with 9mm 147-grain Federal HST expanded ammunition.

CAPACITY

“Damn, I wish I hadn’t had so much ammo” is not something I’ve ever known anyone in a gunfight to say after the fact. The phrase “If you can’t get it done in six, then it ain’t gettin’ done” is asinine, and something that I hear so often it makes me want to rip out what remaining hair I have. None of us are mind readers, and if we could predict beforehand how many rounds we would need to stop a threat, then why the hell wouldn’t we just avoid the threat entirely in the first place? More rounds are a good thing; if you think differently, I’m going to have to politely disagree with you, and think nasty thoughts quietly to myself.

RECOIL

Can I shoot a .40 or .45 as quickly as I can a 9mm? Sure I can. Can I shoot a .40 or .45 as quickly and accurately as I can a 9mm? I wish I could. There are some people who can, but I’m not one of them. Whether I’m shooting strong or weak hand, my accuracy only gets worse. In every force-on-force exercise that I have ever participated in, someone always seems to get shot in the hand. So with that in mind, being able to put rounds on a target quickly with one hand seems important to me.

IT’S CHEAP! (Relatively)

Nine millimeter ammunition is cheaper than any of the other service calibers. Cheaper equals more ammo. More ammo equals more practice, and obviously more practice equals awesome. Since I’m a fan of awesome, it all works out pretty well for me.bullet a

Recently, even the FBI have made the decision to go to the 9mm rounds for all of its agents. Reasonings are similar to what this article have mentioned. (accuracy, penetration, etc..)

So there you go, the logic behind why I’ve chosen 9mm as my preferred handgun caliber. Obviously the choices you make are going to be determined by your circumstances and personal preferences, but hey, at least you know why 9mm gives me the warm and fuzzies that is does. For a more detailed and intelligent take on this subject, check out Service Caliber Handgun Duty and Self-Defense Ammo by Dr. Gary Roberts. ASJ

To know more about John Johnston go to WHAT IS BALLISTIC RADIO?

Editor’s note: John Johnston is the owner and host of Ballistic Radio, a weekly show and podcast dedicated to topics about self-defense, firearms and training with a touch of humor thrown in for good measure. See the cover story of American Shooting Journal’s June 2015 issue. John Johnston is on the cover. 

Posted in Ammo Tagged with: , , , , , ,

March 16th, 2017 by asjstaff

Greeley, PA – Kahr Arms is happy to announce that three of their popular CW9 9mm models are now California legal. These models include the CW9 in a Black Carbon Fiber frame, standard CW9 with front night sight and the very popular Cerakote Burnt Bronze.

 

The three CW9 models all feature a 3.6” barrel with conventional rifling, an overall length of 5.9”, and a height of 4.5” and each pistol weighs just 15.8 oz.  All three models offer a trigger cocking DAO, lock-breach, “Browning-type” recoil lug, and a passive striker block with no magazine disconnect. Capacity is 7+1.

 

The attractive CW9093BCF is one of Kahr’s newest finishes in a classic Black Carbon Fiber print.  This textured weave provides a 3-D dimensional appearance to the 9mm while also providing a textured grip that has a tacky feel in your hand. MSRP on the CW9093BCF is $495.00.

 

Next in the line-up is the CW9093N which features a stainless steel slide and a black polymer frame. It also features a drift adjustable white bar-dot combat rear sight and a pinned in polymer front night sight. MSRP on this model is $495.00.

 

Last in the group is the CW9093BB. The Cerakote Burnt Bronze has been a popular finish for Kahr Firearms Group having introduced it in both the Kahr and Magnum Research product lines. The attractive brushed bronze finish always turns a few heads at the gun range and has proven to be the top choice of many shooting enthusiasts. The MSRP on that model is $482 and is now available for California gun dealers to buy from authorized Kahr Firearms Group wholesalers.

 

For more information about these three models, please go to www.kahr.com or check with your local gun shop.

Posted in Industry News Tagged with: , , , , ,

February 6th, 2017 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]Surprising Results[/su_heading]

Have you ever wondered if your Apple Macbook Pro stop a .22 bullet? How about a 9mm? Well 22 Plinkster Youtuber was curious, so he put this technology to the lead test.

If you didn’t know the construction of an Apple Macbook Pro its pretty impressive. For the test a Smith & Wesson.22 long rifle caliber and 9mm is used against the laptop from approximately 7 yards away. See the video below and the surprising results.

Results
As speculated the Mac Book Pro stopped the .22 cal round, no penetration at all. The big surprise came from the 9mm being the higher velocity bullet, still did not penetrate the laptop.

Though the Apple laptop is not meant to be used as a bullet proof device, its great to know that it can stop a .22 cal and a 9mm handgun. This device could save you if such emergency arises. Thanks to 22 Plinkster for testing this tough technology. We always knew that the gun industry would connect with the technology world in a possible life saving scenario.

[su_heading size=”30″]Video Transcription[/su_heading]

Hey guys, 22 Plinkster here! I’ve got in my hands a Macbook Pro. This is probably one of my number one requested things to see if a 22 will go through, and a viewer was nice enough to send this to me. A lot of people carry macbooks in their backpacks, and also when they’re working at their desks, and you never know when an intruder may come up to you with a 22 pistol and you have to probably defend yourself and defend your life with your macbook pro. But the question is, will it stop a 22 longrifle? We’ll be using a Smith and Wesson M&P 22 compact, loaded with some CCI Minimags, 40 grains traveling at 1235 feet per second, so put in the comments below: Will a Macbook Pro stop a 22 longrifle?

[Intro music]

Ok, lemmy load up five CCI minimags. Again, these are 40-grain, round-nose, non-hollow-point bullets. Traveling at 1235 ft/sec. Using my Smith and Wesson M&P 22 compact, and a SilencerCo barrel suppressor. So, I’m gonna put five rounds into it. [five shots] Alright, five rounds into the macbook pro, let’s see if they went through.

The million-dollar question: Will a Macbook Pro save your life, in case you had it in your backpack and you’re walking, or if someone came up to you and decided they wanted to put a round in you with a 22 longrifle and you could throw it up, would it save your life? Let’s take a look.

Lookit there. Only one round went through. Shot it five times, this round right here went completely through the laptop, so… the other ones stopped cold. That’s pretty impressive! So basically, if a gunman came up to you and all you had was your macbook pro to save your life, you have a four outta five chance that this would stop a 22 longrifle. Let’s look inside and see what it looks like. Probably going to be glass everywhere. [laughter] so there you go! That is pretty impressive. The one that went through was right there. Went right through that key, so that’s pretty awesome. So will a Macbook Pro save your life? Well, the odds are pretty good! Thank you very much for watching guys, until next time, Y’all be safe, and keep plinkin’!

I know what you’re probably thinkin’, what are the chances of someone having a 22 longrifle and you have a macbook? But most people carry a 9mm, right? Well, good thing you say that, I’ve got my Smith and Wesson, M&P 9mm Performance Center, Shield, and I’m gonna put one round in it with some 147-grain federal HSTs. This should blow right through it, but I’m kinda curious to know.

[BANG]

Holy cow, I guarentee ya that went through! Alright, let me go take a look at it. What say you, did it go through? Or not? Right, here’s the shot. Look right there! It stopped a 9mm, Federal HST. You can actually– I don’t know if you can see it or not, but right inside there is actually the bullet. So it stopped a 147-grain federal HST cold. And if you had this in a backpack, you know, there’s several layers of cloth that it would have to go through before it actually hit the macbook. That is pretty impressive! So I know you guys were worried or concerned, saying ‘hey a 22 longrifle’s not very powerful’, but this goes to show you that electronics are pretty dense, and a macbook pro can stop a 9mm Federal HST 147 grainer. Now that’s impressive.

Sources: 22 Plinkster, Eric Nestor

Posted in Just Plinking Tagged with: , , , ,

January 10th, 2017 by jhines

In the mid-season finale of The Walking Dead, Negan stopped Rosita’s bullet with Lucille, his barb wire wrapped bat. Though we don’t know how underpowered the round loaded by Eugene might have been, it was at least powerful enough to cycle the slide on Rosita’s Beretta.

Here’s a video that explores the reality of a scene from season 7, episode 8, wherein Rosita attempts to kill bad guy Negan by shooting at him with a handloaded 9mm. Could this really happen? Could a baseball bat stop a 9mm round? Let’s see.

TV shows aren’t really known for their accurate portrayal of firearms use, and The Walking Dead is no exception. (I don’t know whether to chuckle or sigh every time I see Rick lift and point his .357 Colt Python at an adversary’s feet. How in the heck does he aim?)

But TwangnBang does everything he can to give this a more than fair test. He buys a brand new ash Louisville Slugger and wraps the bat in fake barbed wire so as not to weaken the grain with the nails it would take to secure real barbed wire.

He takes the shot and the bullet goes clean through the sweet spot of the bat and into the rubber dummy behind it. So no, it is highly unlikely that Rosita’s shot would have been captured by Lucille like it was in the show.

But that’s TV! We just have to suspend belief and accept that some things aren’t going to match up with real life. Like, you know, zombies walking the earth.

[su_heading size=”30″]Video Transcription[/su_heading]

Hey, thanks for tuning into TWANGnBANG. Fans of The Walking Dead saw in the most recent midseason finale, the main badguy Negan completely, accidentally, by his own luck, blocking a 9mm intended for his face with his barb-wire-wrapped bat he calls Lucille. Now, the Walking Dead isn’t exactly known for firearms accuracy, and I think this is one of those cases, but I wanted to see for myself, can you block a bullet from a 9mm handgun with a baseball bat? We’re gonna find out next on TWANGnBANG.

[Intro music]

Before I shoot my homemade Lucille, there are a few things I want to point out about her. I’m doing my best to give the bat as much of a chance at stopping a bullet as possible. This is an off-the-shelf Ash louisville Slugger, just like you would expect Lucille to be, Louisville Slugger is the only brand that has an oval right here, all I did was put a brown coat of paint over this, and I took a marker to color in that oval. The other thing I didn’t do was wrap it with real barbed-wire, because you use big heavy-duty fencing nails to hold it in place, and that could weaken the grain, and could create weak spots, make it easier for a bullet to get through. There’s one other way I’m stacking the deck in favor of this bat.

The round I’m using is as close to what Eugene probably loaded for Rosita as I could find. It’s got a lead, round-nose bullet, and it’s loaded with just enough powder to reliably cycle the slide on the handgun. That’s one clue we got from that episode. The spent shell was sitting there on the road, which means that that round at least had enough power to cycle the slide.

OK I think Rosita was a little bit a better shot than I am, but we’re gonna see what we get.

[Shot]

UUGH. Hit a little low, but that went right through. Let’s try that again.

[Shot]

auuugh. [Laughing]

Right through again. Ok, let’s take a look at this.

I messed up my off-sight(?) shooting so close, so I just skimmed the bottom of the bat. The lead bullet still ripped the bat right open like I’d expect it to. My second shot was true though, right in the center of the sweet spot. Lucille was still no match for the power of a 9mm handgun, with the bullet passing RIGHT through the bat, and into the target’s face.

[Laughter] Well, that first round did just skim the bat, but it ripped it apart, the bat never had a chance. The second round was pretty much a perfect hit, right in the sweet spot. It did get deflected up, came out the bat here, splintered it, and went right through rubber dummy’s face here. So that’s– that’s a dead rubber dummy Negan, I think Rosita got ripped off. Even if you account for the fact that the powder that Eugene used to make that load might not’ve been as powerful as modern factory-produced stuff, it was powerful enough to cycle the slide, and the ammo that I used was as downloaded as possible, and still be able to cycle the slide. I don’t know, but [laughter] It’s the Walking Dead.

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and be sure to click right here to subscribe so you can see my next videos on bows, guns, and other cool stuff like trying to stop a bullet with a bat. I really appreciate you watching TWANGnBANG, and hope to see you next time.

2nd Version

I use ammo reloaded as close to what Eugene might have made as I could find, complete with lead round nose bullet and just enough powder to reliably cycle the action. Can a standard Ash Louisville Slugger stop a bullet?

Sources: David Smith, Walking Dead, TwangnBang Youtube


Posted in Just Plinking Tagged with: , , , ,

January 3rd, 2017 by asjstaff

[su_heading size=”30″]SIG Sauer’s 9mm pistol feels both new and familiar, and is an impressive addition to the MPX line.[/su_heading]

STORY AND PHOTOS BY OLEG VOLK

The MPX family of pistol-caliber firearms fixes the main flaw of close-bolt blowback designs: excessive bolt weight. Adapting the AR-15 platform to 9×19 Luger with a gas-piston action, SIG engineers cut the overall weight and the reciprocating bolt carrier in particular, making MPX lighter than other 9mm ARs and cutting the recoil intensity at the same time. The resulting weapon is available as a 16-inch carbine, and as submachine gun, short barrel rifle and pistol, all available with 8-inch or 4.5-inch barrels.

The magazine well and ambidextrous controls optimize an efficient operation.

The magazine well and ambidextrous controls optimize an efficient operation.

In the carbine form, the 7.6-pound overall weight of the weapon is no different from a rifle-caliber AR-15, making it more of a practice version of the 5.56, with less expensive ammo, less concussive report but substantially similar handling and manual of arms. The shorter barrel and forend of the 8-inch SBR and submachine gun variants bring the weight down to 6 pounds, and collapsed length down to 17 inches.

Unfortunately, National Firearms Act restrictions make the SMG unavailable except to government or corporate users, and the tax stamp and yearlong ATF turnaround on approving applications restrict the SBR. That leaves the pistol as the less legally encumbered purchase that can be turned into an SBR at a later date.

The 9mm Luger cartridge generated far smaller volume of gas than 5.56x45mm, so the MPX gas port is almost right at the chamber to generate sufficient pressure for cycling. With most 9mm loads, 8 inches is sufficient to get most of the potential velocity increase from the limited case volume. With the A2 flash hider, the muzzle signature is nonexistent.

 Takedown of the MPX is simple, with all bolt and carrier parts accessible with the removal of a single pin.

Takedown of the MPX is simple, with all bolt and carrier parts accessible with the removal of a single pin.

As with other gas-operated pistol-caliber guns, the MPX favors full-power ammunition for reliability – in my testing, it ran perfectly with 115-, 124- and 147-grain SIGbrand defense and range ammunition, but short-stroked occasionally with wimpy commercial remanufactured ball. With full-power ammunition, MPX has less felt recoil than blowback guns had with subpar loads.

WHEN SUPPORTED, the MPX pistol is superbly accurate. When rested on an convenient cardboard box and sighted with a red dot, the pistol shot very small groups at 25 yards, especially favoring 124- and 147-grain SIG JHP ammunition.

Similar or slightly better results were obtained using the MPX submachine gun in semiautomatic mode. In auto mode, running at about 850 rounds per minute, it remains fairly controllable and will keep two- or three-shot bursts in A zone at 25 yards. The mechanics of the MPX design are very sound. Compared to HK MP5, it runs a good deal cleaner, especially when sound-suppressed. Takedown for cleaning and especially the reassembly are much simpler, with all bolt and carrier parts accessible with the removal of a single pin.

MPX ergonomics are similar to AR-15, but with an emphasis on ambidextrous controls. Slide lock levers and magazine release buttons are duplicated on both sides, a helpful feature. On the left side, the controls could use more separation, as trying to lock the slide back sometimes caused a dropped magazine. The transparent, metal-reinforced polymer magazines made by Lancer are extremely reliable, durable and were easy to load. While more expensive than typically used single-feed Glock magazines, they are far more convenient in use. Available in 10-, 20- and 30-round capacity, MPX magazines fit any purpose, from combat to concealed carry to shooting from a range bench.

THE PRINCIPAL DIFFERENCE between the SBR and the pistol is ergonomics. The pistol comes with a QD socket at the rear of the receiver, right under the rail for the arm brace or the stock. In theory, a solid shooting position can be established with the use of both hands and a stretched sling. In practice, holding a 6-pound weapon in outstretched arms gets tiring fairly soon. Practical accuracy is no better than with a conventional pistol, and the sling length and position make effective concealment difficult.

An optional brace and suppressor add length and flexibility to the MPX.

An optional brace and suppressor add length and flexibility to the MPX.

 A closer look at the bolt carrier recoil spring.

A closer look at the bolt carrier recoil spring.

Furthermore, the ambidextrous charging handle retained from the AR-15 has a tendency to entangle with the plastic sling fixtures, pulling the bolt out of battery and disabling the gun. At close range, especially indoors, the MPX pistol would be more stable if fired from the hip using a green laser for aiming.

In my opinion, the best fighting pistol made by SIG would be something like a full-size P226. The MPX is terrific as a carbine or a submachine gun, but – thanks to filling a regulatory niche created by illogical government regulations – is a pistol in name only. In reality, it’s a stockless carbine and would be best treated as a pre-SBR that the owner gets to take home before the tax stamp arrives.

If NFA regulations and restrictions aren’t your cup of tea, the 16-inch version of the MPX is superbly accurate, has almost no felt recoil and has a proper stock without requiring a tax stamp. For unsuppressed use, carbine-specific 9mm loads, such as 77- (2,000 feet per second) or 115-grain (1,500 fps) Overwatch, provide flat trajectory and effective terminal ballistics. From the 8-inch barrel, Sig V-Crown defensive loads are superior. With lower muzzle pressure than the pistol it also suppressed even more effectively, particularly with the SIG subsonic 147-grain load.

The MPX is superbly accurate at 25 yards.

The MPX is superbly accurate at 25 yards.

Unlike the 5.56mm AR-15, the MPX has no perceptible gas blowback reaching the shooter. Given the excellence of the MPX concept, we can only hope that NFA regulations would be rolled back in the coming year, putting all of its features into the hands of a large and very appreciative group of American firearms enthusiasts. ASJ

Editor’s note: For more on SIG Sauer’s MPX line, see sigsauer.com.

With a stock attached via the QD socket, SIG Sauer’s MPX creates an impressive rainbow of 9mm brass.

With a stock attached via the QD socket, SIG Sauer’s MPX creates an impressive rainbow of 9mm brass.

Posted in Product Reviews Tagged with: , , , ,